Korean violence and US-China tensions


This video from the USA is called South Korea: US war crimes and mad-cow beef imports-1/3.

Part 2 is here.

This video from the USA is called South Korea: US war crimes and mad-cow beef imports-3/3.

Six decades after US and Chinese troops waged bitter hand-to-hand combat south of the Yalu River, tensions on the Korean peninsula are being fed by and are in turn exacerbating great power conflicts between Washington and Beijing: here.

Philippines bans deployment of workers to South Korea: here.

China Proposes Emergency Talks on Korea Tensions: here.

The US and South Korean militaries launched a major show of force in the Yellow Sea Sunday in what is widely seen as both a threat to North Korea and an attempt to intimidate China into ceding to Washington’s position on the escalating crisis on the Korean peninsula: here.

While repeatedly declaring that China must intervene to contain North Korea, Washington and its allies have rebuffed China’s diplomatic efforts to calm the Korean conflict: here.

The Venezuelan government released a statement accusing the United States of provoking the ongoing conflict between North and South Korea to further US interests in the region, Venezuelanalysis.com said November 26: here.

S Korea culls diseased animals: Culling of more than 55,000 animals begin after foot-and-mouth disease confirmed: here.

South Korea’s government was forced on the defensive today after agreeing a deal to tear down many of the country’s trade barriers with the US: here.

Both the Obama administration and the South Korean government of President Lee Myung-bak hailed the renegotiation of the US-South Korean (KORUS) free trade agreement over the weekend as a “win win” deal. In reality, Washington has essentially forced its junior ally to make key concessions on the economic front, in exchange for greater US military protection amid sharp tensions on the Korean peninsula: here.

Bryan Kay, The Christian Science Monitor: “On the eve of South Korean live-fire drills that North Korea vows to answer with ‘merciless strikes,’ desperate Yeonpyeong Islanders are fleeing their homes for the second time in a month. Some stopped at a local church to make one final prayer for their hometown before boarding a boat for mainland South Korea”: here.

South Korea has blocked citizens from accessing websites using the north’s web domain name, saying that the sites contain “illegal information” under the country’s anti-communist and security laws: here.

S. Korea orders culling of more than 3 million livestock to control spread of foot-and-mouth disease: here.

3 thoughts on “Korean violence and US-China tensions

  1. Emergency Alert –

    ACUTE DANGER OF WAR OVER KOREA

    Antiwar movement calls for Emergency response actions at 5 p.m. should fighting break out:

    NYC — Times Square Washington, D.C. — the White House

    In Many Cities – Federal Buildings on Day-of or Day-after

    SIGN the ongoing ONLINE PETITION to the Obama Administration and s. Korean Govt.
    at http://www.iacenter.org/korea/stopattackondprk NOW! (join with thousands who have already signed on)

    The right-wing government in South Korea is once again threatening live-fire war “exercises” from an island right off the coast of north Korea (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea). The DPRK has made it very clear that this would be an act of war to which it would respond vigorously.

    A huge crisis is in the making. The U.S., which over the last month has been conducting joint naval exercises in the area with both Japan and South Korea, could tell its client state in Seoul to cancel these provocative military maneuvers. But instead, the U.S. again blocked any agreement to resolve the crisis during a day-long meeting of the Security Council at U.N. headquarters on Dec. 19.

    The anti-war movement must prepare to respond immediately to any military action by South Korea, the U.S. and/or Japan against the DPRK. With tens if not hundreds of thousands of U.S., Japanese and South Korean troops mobilized in the area — on land and on hundreds of warships and aircraft carriers — the danger of a general war is acute.

    China and Russia have also made it clear that these provocations from the south are very dangerous.

    A look at the background shows why this aggression is so dangerous for world peace:

    • The U.S. still has tens of thousands of troops occupying South Korea and Japan, which have been there since the end of World War II — 65 years ago.

    • Washington still refuses to sign a permanent peace with the DPRK.

    • This island and the waters in question are north of the Demilitarized Zone and only eight miles from the coast of the DPRK.

    • The U.S. deployment of thousands of troops, 50 to 70 ships, and hundreds of aircraft to the area while South Korea is firing thousands of rounds of live ammunition and missiles is an enormously dangerous provocation, not only to the DPRK but to China.

    It is important that antiwar and social justice organizations begin to make plans now for emergency response actions all across the country should the crisis break out in fighting.

    The United National Antiwar Committee, http://www.NationalPeaceConference.org is also circulating a call for Emergency Response Demonstrations in the event of an attack.

    Many groups are sending out Emergency Alerts and circulating calls for Day After Actions. Together we can make our voices strong and unified.

    SIGN ONLINE AT http://www.iacenter.org/korea/stopattackondprk NOW!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Mad Cow disease in the USA | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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