Little cavegirl’s rock art


Mammoth painting in Rouffignac cave

By Jennifer Viegas:

Most scholars have assumed that all prehistoric artists were male, but new evidence suggests women and even young girls produced at least some cave drawings, according to a study in the latest Oxford Journal of Archaeology.

The study focused on finger flutings made on the walls and ceiling of Rouffignac Cave in the Dordogne, France.

The flutings — lines drawn with the fingers on soft surfaces — as well as other art in the cave are thought to be 13,000 to 14,000 years old, based on stylistic considerations.

The figures pictured here were likely created by a 5-year old girl. The researchers came to this conclusion based not only on her hand dimensions but also on the height of the places where she had been able to reach.

Let’s Stop Assuming The Early Cave Painters Were Dudes. Your quick guide to feminist archaeology: here.

Southern African Rock Art: here.

An ar­chae­o­log­i­cal site dis­cov­ered three years ago was ap­par­ent­ly a work­shop in which ear­ly hu­mans made, mixed and stored ochre, the ear­li­est form of paint, re­search­ers are re­port­ing: here.

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10 thoughts on “Little cavegirl’s rock art

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  3. Thank you Jennifer (Little Cave Girl) this sounds really great. I think they would have been just like children are today – they would have loved to paint things on walls.

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