London wildlife survey results


This video from England is about a mother fox and 6 young foxes filmed in London.

From Wildlife Extra:

London wildlife survey results

23/09/2009 09:17:19

Make Your Nature Count

September 2009. You’re more likely to see a fox in London than you will in the countryside. That’s the finding of the RSPB‘s first ever spring survey, Make Your Nature Count.

More than 62,000 people took part in the new wildlife stock-take. Participants were asked to note the birds as well as other garden visitors, such as squirrels, frogs and toads.

Pigeons are most common – Cats in 86% of gardens

In London pigeons are the most common garden visitors, followed by blackbirds and robins. Traditionally, house sparrows and starlings were the top two most common species, but, worryingly, they’ve slipped to seventh and eighth places respectively. Cats were recorded in 86% of the gardens surveyed, almost equalled by the number of squirrels. Foxes were third placed, appearing in 70 per cent of gardens.

London and wildlife aren’t things that mix all that often. Sure, the outer boroughs do well, what with the Richmond deer and all, but the closest an inner-city Londoner normally gets to wildlife is being disturbed at 3 am on a summer morning by a wailing pair of mating foxes, only to be woken up a couple of hours later by the dawn chorus. Beyond this, a whole host of non-native and exotic wildlife has made London its home, and although these species aren’t quite as headline-worthy as the Thames whale or the Essex lion, they’re still here: here.

Wales: Red squirrels have found their way across the Menai Strait from Anglesey to Gwynedd, conservationists believe: here.

Red squirrels are returning to areas of Scotland where they have not been seen for years, according to campaigners: here.

2 thoughts on “London wildlife survey results

  1. Pingback: Urban foxes in Paris | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: British Wildlife Photography Awards 2015 starts | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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