John Berger and Sebastião Salgado on migration


This video says about itself:

Over the past 30 years Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado‘s work has won every major award for excellence. More importantly, his photographs have had an actual impact on the world and how it is seen, bringing conditions of famine and poverty to the attention of a jaded first world in a profound and arresting way.

Best known for “Ways of Seeing,” the seminal book and BBC series on art criticism, John Berger is one of the world’s leading critics of art and photography. His “Selected Essays,” written over nearly 50 years, has just been published (Pantheon Books, 2002).

In THE SPECTRE OF HOPE Sebastião Salgado joins Berger to pore over Salgado’s collection “Migrations.” Six years and 43 countries in the making (ranging across Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America), “Migrations” contains photographs of people pushed from their homes and traditions to cities and their margins – slums and streets and refugee camps. Sitting at the kitchen table of Berger’s home in the Swiss Alps, their intimate conversation, intercut with photographs from “Migrations,” combines a discussion of Salgado’s work with a critique of globalization, and a wide-ranging investigation of the power of the image.

4 thoughts on “John Berger and Sebastião Salgado on migration

  1. Pingback: John Berger’s new poetry book | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Art critic John Berger, new book | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: John Berger and art, new book | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: British art critic John Berger, RIP | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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