Honduran coup and the media


This video says about itself:

Venezuelan-American attorney and lawyer Eva Golinger says the military coup [in Honduras] couldn’t have happened without the approval of Washington.

Underlying the coup that overthrew Honduran President Manuel Zelaya is a social system dominated by extreme inequality and grinding poverty for the vast majority of the country’s people, as well as a long history of US intervention and domination: here.

The contrasting coverage of events in Iran and Honduras says a great deal about the character and role of the [US] American media: here.

Over 100 people have packed an emergency public meeting in London last night against the recent illegal coup in Honduras: here.

The 192-member Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) has condemned the coup in Honduras, further isolating the regime of de-facto premier Roberto Micheletti: here.

Indigenous Hondurans on the coup: here.

Nikolas Kozloff: Who’s Behind Honduras Destabilization? All Roads Lead to McCain, see here. And here.

Honduras update 13 July 2009: here.

Nikolas Kozloff: Chiquita (United Fruit Co.) from Arbenz 1954 to Zelaya 2009: here.

5 thoughts on “Honduran coup and the media

  1. Mass people’s resistance in Honduras — In their own words

    Compiled and introduced by Felipe Stuart Cournoyer
    July 10, 2009 — Most of the coverage of the military coup in Honduras
    from bourgeois and liberal circles, and from many Western foreign
    ministers, has focused on what various governments are doing to
    influence or force an outcome to this struggle.Statements from Honduras’
    President Manuel Zelaya, his foreign minister Patricia Rodas, and from
    leaders of other ALBA countries (especially Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez,
    Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega, Ecuador’s Rafael Correa and Bolivia’s Evo
    Morales) have emphasised the role of the mass movement in Honduras. So
    have the most astute analysts of the rapidly moving events unleashed by
    the coup.

    * Read more http://links.org.au/node/1143

    Photo essay: Honduras, July 5: 100,000 gather to greet `Mel’, army
    shoots and kills protesters

    Photos and text by James Rodríguez

    * Read more http://links.org.au/node/1139

    Like

  2. Hondurans pour into the streets to demand Zelaya’s return — `We are
    more determined than ever to overthrow this terrible coup’

    By Medea Benjamin
    Tegucigalpa, July 5, 2009 — The day started out full of joy, as
    thousands of Hondurans converged in front of the National Institute of
    Pedagogy, intent on marching about three miles to the airport to greet
    the plane that was supposed to bring deposed President Zelaya back to
    Honduras.
    “Our president’s coming home today, this is going to be a great day”,
    said Jose Rodriguez, a campesino who came from Santa Barbara with his
    farmer’s group to join the anti-coup movement. The military tried to
    stop them from getting to the capital, so they had to divide up and take
    local buses from town to town. “It took us two days to get here, and we
    slept outside in the forest last night, but we had to be here”, said
    Rodriguez.

    * Read more http://links.org.au/node/1138

    Photo essay: Honduras, July 4 — `Mel, Amigo, El Pueblo Está
    Contigo’ (`Mel, our friend, the people are with you!’)

    Photos and text by James Rodríguez

    * Read more http://links.org.au/node/1137

    Like

  3. Pingback: Honduran death squads murder 13-year-old girl | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Over 100 lawyers murdered in Honduras | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Honduras, coup against democracy again? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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