Martinique strikers’ victory


Workers' demonstration in Fort-de-France, Martinique

From British daily The Morning Star:

Strike forces bosses to give way on pay

Thursday 12 March 2009

VICTORIOUS: Collective Against Exploitation leader Elie Domota signing the deal

UNION leaders called off a month-long strike on Martinique after bosses finally agreed to deliver a pay boost for low-paid workers.

February 5 Collective president Michael Monrose, who had been co-ordinating the industrial action, reported that street blockades were being lifted and businesses and schools should reopen today.

The agreement, which was reached at around 2am on Wednesday after 12 hours of negotiations, calls for a 200 euro (£185.10) monthly pay increase for 47,000 low-paid workers.

Those who earn more will see a smaller increase and the agreement is applicable from March 1, meaning that workers’ wages will be backdated.

Bosses have already agreed to lower prices on roughly 400 basic necessities by 20 per cent one month after shops reopen.

The pact matches an agreement that ended a 44-day strike on the French island of Guadeloupe on March 4.

There, the Collective Against Exploitation warned that it would resume the strike if government officials and bosses renege on a deal to raise pay and lower petrol prices.

Negotiations over food prices and other demands are ongoing.

Collective leader Elie Domota described the deal as “a first step.

“In the coming months and weeks, there will be many other struggles on training and employment. We remain mobilised,” Mr Domota affirmed.

See also here. And here. And here. And here. And here.

FORMER ministers accused French President Nicolas Sarkozy on Wednesday of undermining the “global balance of power” by seeking to return France to the heart of NATO’s military command: here.

France’s National Assembly has voted its approval for the foreign policy of President Nicolas Sarkozy and Prime Minister François Fillon, including Sarkozy’s plans to fully reintegrate France into NATO’s military command: here.

4 thoughts on “Martinique strikers’ victory

  1. Mar 14, 5:34 PM EDT

    Martinique demonstrators celebrate end of strike

    FORT-DE-FRANCE, Martinique (AP) — Thousands of demonstrators are marching and singing in the streets of Martinique after officials signed an agreement ending a monthlong strike on the French Caribbean island.

    A crowd of about 20,000 people turned up Saturday to celebrate the resolution, which includes salary increases for low-wage earners. The pact matches an agreement that ended a 44-day strike on the sister French island of Guadeloupe on March 4.

    Protesters have lifted blockades, and businesses have begun to reopen since negotiators reached the agreement on Wednesday. The general strike had turned violent as some protesters attacked business people and set cars on fire.

    © 2009 The Associated Press.

    Like

  2. French colonies seek autonomy

    France: The Islands of Martinique and French Guiana are to conduct a referendum on more independence from Paris, officials said on Wednesday.

    After talks with French President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris, the leaders of the executive branches in Martinique and French Guiana Alfred Marie-Jeanne and Antoine Karam respectively said that they would vote on January 17 on whether or not to cease being departments in favour of “autonomy status.”

    http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/index.php/news/world/World-In-Brief152

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  4. Pingback: Prehistoric Caribbean boa snake bone beads | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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