Seychelles conservation success


This video says about itself:

BirdLife’s story of Cousin Island and the Seychelles Warbler. An interview with Nirmal Shah – CE of Nature Seychelles (BirdLife in the Seychelles).

From BirdLife:

Seychelles success story

17-12-2008

This week BirdLife International and Nature Seychelles (BirdLife in Seychelles) are celebrating the anniversary of one the world’s greatest conservation success stories. In 1968, Cousin Island was purchased by the International Council of Bird Preservation (ICBP now BirdLife International) to save the last remaining population of Seychelles Warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis from extinction. Forty years on, warbler numbers have risen by 300%, and the island has been transformed from a coconut plantation to a profitable Nature Reserve which greatly benefits local people and global biodiversity.

Cousin Island – a small island in Seychelles – is today home to a wealth of globally important wildlife. It is the most significant nesting site for Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata in the Western Indian Ocean, and supports over 300,000 nesting seabirds of seven species. Cousin also hosts five of the Seychelles’ eleven endemic land-birds including: Seychelles Magpie-robin Copsychus seychellarum (Endangered), Seychelles Sunbird Nectarinia dussumieri, Seychelles Fody Foudia seychellarum and Seychelles Blue-pigeon Alectroenas pulcherrima.

3 thoughts on “Seychelles conservation success

  1. Pingback: Hawksbill turtles’ love life discoveries | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Beautiful Seychelles island gets website | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Good Seychelles conservation news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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