How the US El Salvador solidarity movement was persecuted


This video from Democracy Now! in the USA says about itself:

Seymour Hersh said recently that John Negroponte was unhappy about the similarity with the funding of the 3-16 paramilitary death squad under his watch on the USS Honduras and the “El Salvador option” in Iraq.

Negroponte is either incompetent or preparing the ground for his now predictable “plausible deniability” routine.

From the Independent series about United States activists:

Linda Hajek

1982

When the FBI infiltrated the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES), a group opposed to Ronald Reagan’s policy in Central America, Linda Hajek, a Catholic sister, found herself under scrutiny.

We started our community-based chapter of CISPES in Dallas about 1980. Up to then, there had been a small group of church people exchanging information on Central American events. We tried to speak to as many groups as we could about El Salvador. We did lobbying. Our first demonstration was during Central America Week in 1981. We suspected there might be some plants – we knew they had been placed in other organisations – but I have to say that every time I took it seriously, I felt I was being arrogant. We were a small group, and what we were doing didn’t seem to merit that kind of attention. Then the story came out, a long front-page Sunday morning type of thing. And there was my name in the middle of it. It read like a soap opera, like Dallas: the story of this guy, this FBI informant Frank Varelli, who was going to get me in a motel room and seduce me and have the sex scene recorded on film. I mean, it was so ridiculous; at the time I was a Catholic sister. I thought, “Who would do this kind of thing in the name of national security?” Varelli also said they had a device that could record conversations. He said they used it mainly to keep track of the numbers we phoned. And Varelli said they tampered with our mail. They watched where we lived, the Bethany House of the Holy Cross Catholic Church. They sat out there in the parking lot and copied down the licence plates of all the people who came here. But in a sense, Frank Varelli was not the problem. The real problem was that the government believed it had the right to break into citizens’ homes, put taps on their phones, and send people to meetings to spy on them if they dissented from the government’s policy.

Repression of dissent in the USA: here.

2 thoughts on “How the US El Salvador solidarity movement was persecuted

  1. Pingback: Salvadorean murderers of Spanish priests arrested | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Salvadorean right-wing murderer of Dutch journalists found | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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