Coral reef grows in Venice, Italy


This video is called Venice, Italy – August 3 2006.

From the Daily Telegraph in England:

Venice flood barrier blossoms into coral reef

By Malcolm Moore in Rome

Last Updated: 12:01am BST 02/04/2008

A coral reef has bloomed in the Adriatic Sea on the site where a tidal barrier is being constructed to protect Venice.

Marine biologists said the Mose project – a Thames Barrier-style defence around the Venetian lagoon – has proven an irresistible magnet to rare coral, fish and crustaceans.

They have discovered more than 150 different species, including the giant pen shell (Pinna nobilis), an endangered bivalve that can grow up to 3ft long and is normally found in the warmer waters around Sardinia.

The reef, on the mile-long rock and cement barrier, has taken hold in just two years and is also being visited by the Dustbin-Lid jellyfish (Rhizostoma octupus), the largest in the Mediterranean, which can measure up to 2ft across.

Andrea Rismondo, a marine biologist at the University of Padua said: “This barrier was built for an entirely different purpose. However, the structure has become an amazing meeting point for all sorts of fish, flora and fauna.”

He added that because of global warming, the waters around Venice can now host the sort of fish and coral that were previously found only in the southern Mediterranean or Red Sea.

Bikini corals recover from atomic blast; but not all species of them: here. See photos here.

Great Barrier Reef: here.

No-take marine reserves, in which fishing is completely banned, can lead to very rapid comebacks of the fish species most prized by commercial and recreational fisheries, reveals a new study of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef published in the June 24th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication: here.

De Wit has conducted studies at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, where he and his colleagues have found four entirely new species of the Grania worm. One of them is the beautifully green-coloured Grania colorata: here.

Ten years to save Australia’s Great Barrier Reef: here.

New Coral Reefs Discovered in Iceland: here.

Coding Early Naturalists’ Accounts into Long-Term Fish Community Changes in the Adriatic Sea (1800–2000): here.

Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals: here.

7 thoughts on “Coral reef grows in Venice, Italy

  1. Rudd warns ships off Barrier Reef

    Australia: Cargo ships that enter restricted waters of the Great Barrier Reef will face the full force of the law, the country’s leader Kevin Rudd has said.

    Salvage crews are still working to remove 1,000 tons of heavy fuel oil from the Shen Neng 1, which slammed into a shoal more than a week ago after veering into protected waters.

    Police arrested three men from another boat that had allegedly entered a restricted part of the reef yesterday.

    “If we have any foreign vessel or any vessel violating the proper protection of the reef, they should have the book thrown at them,” said Mr Rudd.

    http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/

    Like

  2. Pingback: Marco Polo really was in China | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: British poet Attila the Stockbroker in Venice, Italy | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Spanish government sacrificing marine environment to Big Oil? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: New jellyfish species discovered near Venice | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Climate protest at Venice film festival | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Corals fight back against global warming | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.