South African poetry


This video says about herself:

musical theatre with singer/songwriter Niki Romijn and bassplayer Erik Robaard based upon the poetry of the South African writer Ingrid Jonker.

From Poetry International:

Editorial March 2008

In March we welcome South Africa back into the fold – Liesl Jobson has put together a fascinating issue of classic and contemporary. We’re delighted that Ingrid Jonker, an iconic James Dean/ Sylvia Plath figure due to her talent and early death, is finally featured on the site. André Brink summarises her work thus, “In one way or another most of these poems concern an underlying awareness of a relationship – between woman and man, child and parent, you and I, ego and alter ego: and from this ‘double game’ arises a persistent impression of a life left incomplete, broken, shattered, condemned forever to search for the magic word, or the magic potion, which may restore the lost wholeness of the primal couple.”

We can also now read the very impressive Nontsizi Mgqwetho, active in the 1920s, “one of the greatest literary artists ever to write in Xhosa, an anguished voice of an urban woman confronting male dominance, ineffective leadership, black apathy, white malice and indifference, economic exploitation and a tragic history of nineteenth-century territorial and cultural dispossession.” Nor to be missed is Mazisi Kunene, said to have reconstructed the identity of the African continent, and Rustum Kozain, an accomplished prize-winning young poet.

Love poetry of ancient Egypt: here.

Caribbean-British artist Barbara Walker in South Africa: here.

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