Rare birds seen this year in Britain


This video says about itself:

Off South Africa’s Cape of Good Hope in the dead of night, he crashed into our ship and was stranded until the next day — when Anthropologist Mike Moffatt and Ornithologist Janet Williams gave him a boost back out to sea. Yellow-Nosed Albatross: Diomedia chlororhynchos.

From British daily The Independent:

A very British bird boom

This year more rare birds have been sighted on our shores than ever before. And, as David Randall finds, it’s our very own hi-tech twitchers that we need to thank

Published: 16 December 2007

Rare birds are arriving in Britain at a rate unprecedented in modern times, providing an almost weekly spectacle for the country’s ever-growing army of twitchers.

A survey by The Independent on Sunday of data supplied by Birdwatch magazine shows that the past year has been the most remarkable one for sightings in decades. Normally, one or two bird species appear for the first time over Britain, but in the past 12 months, there have been six: a Pacific diver in Yorkshire, glaucous-winged gull in Gloucestershire and Wales, long-billed murrelet in Devon, yellow-nosed albatross in Somerset and Lincolnshire, masked booby off Portland in Dorset, and, this month, a great blue heron blown into the Scillies by a strong westerly weather system. The result is that the list of birds recorded in Britain – which, at 577, is the longest in Europe – is now even more impressive.

Glaucous gull: here.

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