Trying to save seahorses in Sydney, Australia


This is a video of a male seahorse giving birth to babies.

From the Sydney Morning Herald in Australia:

Seahorses released to save their species

November 13, 2007 – 7:29PM

Thirty tiny seahorses have the survival of their species riding on their backs, with a new conservation program entering a crucial stage in Sydney Harbour on Tuesday.

The program, financed by the Sydney Aquarium Conservation Fund, aims to monitor and boost the number of White’s seahorses – a protected species found only in NSW – in areas where their stocks are depleted.

A total of 18 male and 12 females seahorses were transferred from their small tank at Sydney Aquarium to their new home, the Manly Cove swimming net, on Tuesday morning.

NSW Department of Primary Industries program developer, marine scientist David Harasti, said it is the first time captive-bred seahorses have been tagged for monitoring.

The tag will expand as the six-month-old seahorses, now just 5cm in length, mature.

The White’s seahorse, named after John White, surgeon general of the First Fleet, lives in seagrass and algae beds and can often be found living on the mesh swimming nets around Sydney Harbour.

3 thoughts on “Trying to save seahorses in Sydney, Australia

  1. Hi Aquagrrl, thanks very much for your interesting links! I think the difference between Malaysia 2003 and Australia 2007 is that in Malaysia the seahorses were colour tagged; in Australia they were tagged electronically.

    Like

  2. Pingback: British marine wildlife threatened | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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