24 Species Believed New to Science found in Papua New Guinea Highlands


From Wildlife Extra:

24 Species Believed New to Science found in Papua New Guinea Highlands

October 2007. Scientists exploring the remote Mount Kaijende Highlands of Enga Province in Papua New Guinea (PNG) have discovered 24 species believed to be new to science – 16 species of plants and eight species of frogs, including a probable new genus.
Astrapia mayeri
The findings of a 2005 expedition led by Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) and Papua New Guinea’s Department of Environment and Conservation demonstrate the value of exploring unknown regions such as PNG’s remote highlands to assess conservation needs and to inform development decisions. …

In total the RAP survey documented 643 species, including at least 16 species of plants and eight species of frogs that are believed new to science. One of the frogs probably represents a new genus. Significant range extensions were recorded for several threatened and little-known taxa including the Giluwe Rat (Rattus giluwensis), the Long-bearded Melidectes honeyeater (Melidectes princeps), and the frog species Litoria becki and Callulops glandulosus. A spectacular bird of paradise known as the Ribbon-tailed Astrapia (Astrapia mayeri) – which has the longest tail feathers in relation to body size of any bird – was found to be abundant relative to other areas of PNG.

Phylogeny of the avian genus Pitohui [in New Guinea] and the evolution of toxicity in birds: here.

The role of toxic pitohuis in mixed-species flocks of lowland forest in Papua New Guinea: here.

Hawaiian honeyeaters’ long-lost relatives found: here.

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