10 thoughts on “UK rich eat illegal caviar, threatening sturgeon

  1. Sturgeon

    A recent study at the University of Paris-South in Orsay, France, asked people at upscale receptions to sample and compare two types of caviar—one from a common species of sturgeon and one from a rare sturgeon species. Seventy percent of participants preferred the rare caviar. The researchers conducted the same taste test at a supermarket, targeting people who were not familiar with caviar, and they, too—by 74 percent—preferred the rare caviar. The punchline is that in both tests the caviar offered was exactly the same, coming from farmed sturgeon. The results bode ill for an ancient fish species already losing the battle for survival (see February/March 2005 National Wildlife) to habitat loss and degradation as well as to commercial egg collection. One hope for sturgeon has been the potential for replacing eggs collected in the wild with farmed eggs, but this test suggests that people’s taste buds respond more to the label on a caviar jar than to the caviar itself, creating a market for the rarer, more expensive forms even if there is no noticeable difference in taste. Caspian Sea sturgeons, which produce some of the most expensive caviar in the world, could become extinct by 2012 at current rates of egg collection.—Roger Di Silvestro

    http://www.nwf.org/NationalWildlife/article.cfm?issueID=124&articleID=1657

    Like

  2. Pingback: Sturgeon endangered | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Rich get richer, meet at WEF in Davos | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Sturgeon reappears in Baltic Sea | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Austerity in Saudi Arabia, but not for royals | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Save sea trout in England | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Big anti-Trump demonstration tomorrow in Paris, France | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: Italian mafia and animals | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  9. Pingback: London, Grenfell disaster survivors and billionaires | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  10. Pingback: 400 million-year-old coelacanth fossil discovered in the USA | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.