Birds of the Dwingelderveld, the Netherlands


This video shows Eurasian cranes in Gallocanta, Spain.

Recently, a report on animals of the Dwingelderveld, the Netherlands, in 2006, came out. About birds, it says:

Species that are gone or almost gone include hobby, black grouse, grey partridge, black tern and black-tailed godwit. Red-necked grebe, marsh harrier [see also here], bluethroat and red-backed shrike are new species. Especially the list of species who have increased is encouragingly long, including dabchik, black-necked grebe, water rail, woodcock [see also here], lesser spotted woodpecker, woodlark and stonechat. Also, cranes have started to spend the summer here. In 2007, this resulted in a couple of cranes nesting.

Sandhill crane: here.

Sarus crane video: here.

Dwingelderveld owls: here.

Great grey shrikes in the Netherlands: here.

Birds, art, and music: here.

Dwingelderveld blue butterflies: here.

9 thoughts on “Birds of the Dwingelderveld, the Netherlands

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