Fireballs set half the planet ablaze, killing mammoths, America’s Stone Age hunters


From The Observer in Britain:

Diamonds tell tale of comet that killed off the cavemen

Fireballs set half the planet ablaze, wiping out the mammoth and America’s Stone Age hunters

Robin McKie, science editor

Sunday May 20, 2007

Scientists will outline dramatic evidence this week that suggests a comet exploded over the Earth nearly 13,000 years ago, creating a hail of fireballs that set fire to most of the northern hemisphere.

Primitive Stone Age cultures were destroyed and populations of mammoths and other large land animals, such as the mastodon, were wiped out.

The blast also caused a major bout of climatic cooling that lasted 1,000 years and seriously disrupted the development of the early human civilisations that were emerging in Europe and Asia.

‘This comet set off a shock wave that changed Earth profoundly,’ said Arizona geophysicist Allen West.

‘It was about 2km-3km in diameter and broke up just before impact, setting off a series of explosions, each the equivalent of an atomic bomb blast.

The result would have been hell on Earth. Most of the northern hemisphere would have been left on fire.’

The theory is to be outlined at the American Geophysical Union meeting in Acapulco, Mexico.

A group of US scientists that include West will report that they have found a layer of microscopic diamonds at 26 different sites in Europe, Canada and America.

These are the remains of a giant carbon-rich comet that crashed in pieces on our planet 12,900 years ago, they say. …

These are the sudden disappearance of the first Stone Age people of America, the disappearance of mammoths throughout much of Europe and America and the sudden cooling of the planet, an event known as the Younger-Dryas period.

Various theories have been put forward to explain these occurrences, but now scientists believe they have found a common cause in a comet crash.

However, the idea is still controversial and the theory is bedevilled by problems in obtaining accurate dates for the different events.

See also here.

And here.

And here. And here.

Comet Killed Ice Age Beasts: here.

A controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans is gaining traction from research sites around the world: here.

A critical view on this comet impact theory: here.

Prehistoric figurines of mammoths: here.

Baby mammoth found in Russia: here.

4 thoughts on “Fireballs set half the planet ablaze, killing mammoths, America’s Stone Age hunters

  1. Fossil skull reunited with body

    By Jon Johnson, Assistant Editor Eastern Arizona Courier

    A 2.5-million-year-old rhynchotherium skull sits attached to a car hood strapped to the shovel of a front-end loader. Eric Reynolds and Ron Peru of the BLM carried the skull to a flatbed truck nearly a mile away. Contributed photo

    A 1,000 pound, 2.5-million-year-old rhynchotherium skull has joined the rest of its bones at the Mesa Southwest Museum on May 9 and is now one of the museum’s largest pieces.

    A rhynchotherium is an extinct mastodont relative of the elephant with four tusks. The rhynchotherium died out during the Pleistocene Epoch at the beginning of the most recent Ice Age.

    The skull was a challenge to move for Bureau of Land Management geologist Larry Thrasher and Mesa Southwest Museum Curator of Paleontology Dr. Robert McCord’s teams.

    Earlier unsuccessful attempts included a helicopter crew from the Mesa Police and Fire departments trying to airlift it out and trying to drag the skull, which was resting on a car hood, using a six-wheel drive ATV from the BLM.

    Eric Reynolds and Ron Peru from the Gila District Force Account crew of the BLM used its front-end loader tractor to lift and carry the skull to an awaiting flat-bed truck. Thrasher then delivered the skull to the museum in Mesa.

    He said it was a combination of tactics that finally freed the skull.
    A 2.5-million-year-old rhynchotherium skull sits attached to a car hood strapped to the shovel of a front-end loader. Eric Reynolds and Ron Peru of the BLM carried the skull to a flatbed truck nearly a mile away. Contributed photo

    “There was no way they could’ve gotten the loader up that little ravine where the fossil was,” Thrasher said, “so it was essential that we had pulled it out to that ridge (with the ATV) like we did.”

    Thrasher first spotted the fossil in 2005 while inspecting fossil beds in an area known as the “111 Ranch,” located approximately 20 miles southeast of Safford. More that 1,000 fossils have been recovered from the area and sent to the Mesa Southwest Museum.

    The rhynchotherium’s bones are on temporary display in the museum’s “Paradise Lost: Arizona South of the Ice” exhibit.

    http://www.eacourier.com/articles/2007/05/21/local_news/news02.txt

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  2. Pingback: ‘American megafauna not killed off by Clovis people’ | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: End of Ice Age was end for Alaskan wolves | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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