Tiger discovery in Thailand


This video is called Wild Indochinese Tigers in Thailand.

From Wildlife Extra:

Tigers recorded in Thailand’s Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary for the first time

Conservationists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) have for the first time captured images of a tiger in Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand, officially confirming the presence of these cats in the Sanctuary.

Covering 868km squared, Salakpra is part of the Western Forest Conservation Complex (WEFCOM), a priority tiger area located close to the Myanmar border. Although tigers have been known to live and breed in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary in the northern part of WEFCOM, no tiger has been recorded as far south as Salakpra until now. The two sanctuaries are connected through the Srisawat Forest Corridor, which ZLS say could be an important area for tigers providing that the right protection is in place.

For years rangers, villagers and hill tribes people in the area have maintained that they have seen tigers and signs of tigers south of Huai Kha Khaeng, which prompted researchers at ZSL to undertaken the first comprehensive survey of Salakpra to investigate the presence of the big cat.

Last spring, they set up camera traps along known wildlife pathways into two areas of the sanctuary, and almost one year later they were rewarded with the first image of a tiger in Salakpra. Three days after the first image, another shot was taken of a tiger in a different part of the sanctuary. It was confirmed that it was the same animal in both images, and has been identified as a female born in Hui Kha Khaeng. “These two images confirm what rangers and villagers have long suspected – that tigers born in Huai Kha Khaeng are moving at least as far south as Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary,” says Craig Bruce, ZSL’s Senior Programme Manager for Asia. “Tigers are facing a very real threat of extinction in Thailand and across their range. That we now have evidence of tigers in an area where they have not previously been recorded is extremely positive news – it suggests they are using more of the WEFCOM landscape than previously thought. The next stage of our work will be continued camera trapping to build a picture of prey availability in Salakpra and determine whether other nearby areas are also being used by tigers.”

Amur tiger swims from Russia to China


This video is about Amur tigers.

From Wildlife Extra:

Film shows Amur tiger swimming across Russia’s border to China

An Amur tiger has been filmed swimming across the Ussuri River from Russia to China.

The rare episode took place close to Russia’s Bolshekhekhtsirsky Nature Reserve and China’s wetlands of the Sanjiang Nature Reserve.

Its swim was filmed by two Chinese fishermen on their mobile phones.

“In general, it is a usual thing for a tiger to swim across rivers, but in this case I am amazed at the river width – 300-350 metres – that the tiger covered successfully,” said Pavel Fomenko, biodiversity conservation program coordinator at WWF Russia Amur branch.

“The tiger’s swim across the Ussuri can be regarded as a search for prey, or a mate, or new habitats. It is very important for the Chinese colleagues to monitor the tiger translocation. I hope the rare predator will be safe in China”.

This area is a transboundary corridor used by tigers when crossing the Sino- Russian border.

“It is significant to monitor the Amur tiger and its prey base progress jointly by Russia and China,” saif Shi Quanhua, senior programme manager of the Asian big cats program of WWF China.

“Our task today is to keep track of this tiger movements, to work with local people and governmental agencies in order to safeguard the animal regardless of the place where it stays – in China or back in Russia”.

Watch the film HERE.

Sumatran tiger Internet game


This video is called On the Trail of the Tiger. It says about itself:

Award-winning photographer Steve Winter documents the disappearance of Asian Tigers in India, Sumatra, and Thailand.

From Wildlife Extra:

Zoological Society of London creates fun online game to highlight Sumatran tigers

The Zoological Society of London is inviting animal lovers to embrace their inner-beast and take on the persona of a fearsome predator in a brand new online challenge called Tiger Territory: The Game.

To celebrate the huge success of ZSL London Zoo’s flagship Sumatran tiger exhibit, Tiger Territory: The Game was launched to give budding conservationists and game-addicts alike the chance to experience life as a wild tiger deep in the forests of Indonesia.

With two modes to keep gamers on their toes, players get to grips with their surroundings in the Adventure stage, where they have to unlock 12 achievements. Highlighting the tigers’ behaviours and ZSL conservation techniques, including sniffing out prey and being ‘papped’ by a camera-trap, players have to be careful to evade poachers’ snares and palm oil plantations guarded by electric fences.

Once gamers have earned their stripes, they can embrace the Sumatran tigers’ remarkable hunting abilities in Arcade mode. In just 60 seconds their tigers have to hunt and eat as much as they can, from the common wild boar to the incredibly elusive tapir, in an attempt to boost their energy points.

Game-maker Filip Hnizdo said: “Tiger Territory: The Game is a chance for people to take on some of the challenges that wild Sumatran tigers face every day, from avoiding palm oil plantations to hunting for their speedy prey.

“We’ve worked with the conservation teams at ZSL London Zoo to replicate the tigers’ Indonesian home and behaviours as closely as possible – including the prey they hunt, rivers for them to swim in, and trees for them to hide under.

“We hope people will have great fun playing, and that they’ll also take away some awareness of the wild lives of Sumatran tigers and the very real threats that they’re facing – unfortunately for them, it’s not a game.”

With just 300 Sumatran tigers remaining in the wild, ZSL London Zoo coordinates the worldwide conservation breeding programme for the species, and is working in Indonesia to create wildlife corridors between fragmented forests, patrol tiger habitats, and carry out vital monitoring of the wild populations.

PLAY TIGER TERRITORY: THE GAME: here.

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Good tiger, rhino, elephant news from Nepal


This video says about itself:

Wildlife encounters on safari in Nepal at the … Bardia National Park. Wild elephants, one-horned rhinoceros, and amazing encounters and charges by the Royal Bengal Tiger.

From Wildlife Extra:

Nepal celebrates zero poaching year

March 2014: Celebrations are running high in Nepal because for the second time in recent years it has achieved a major milestone in conservation, a zero poaching of tigers, rhinos and elephants for the period February 2013-February 2014. (The last time was in 2011).

At a time when tigers and rhinos are being rampantly poached around the world, this success it is a great reward for the country’s work and commitment to combating wildlife crime, and resounds hope for wildlife.

“The success of achieving zero poaching throughout the year is a huge achievement and a result of prioritising a national need to curb wildlife crimes in the country,” says Megh Bahadur Pandey, Director General of Nepal’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation. “A national level commitment is key to encouraging complementing efforts, right down to the grassroots level, in order to address this biggest threat to wildlife not just in Nepal but across the world.”

It is due to strengthened protection and enforcement efforts across the country, led by the government and supported by its conservation partners such as WWF and the National Trust for Nature Conservation. The newly developed Wildlife Crime Control Bureau and the establishment of its 16 district cells together with the Central Investigation Bureau of Nepal Police has also helped create the needed balance between central and local level enforcement to curb wildlife crimes.

“It is a matter of great pride to mark the first World Wildlife Day with the announcement of a year of zero poaching in Nepal,” says Anil Manandhar, Country Representative of WWF Nepal. “We are committed to work with the government, conservation partners and the local communities to redouble efforts to sustain this success.”

“We congratulate Nepal on reducing poaching to zero within its borders,” says Yolanda Kakabadse, President of WWF International. “This achievement serves as a model for WWF’s goal for drastically reducing wildlife crime worldwide – with a combination of brave policy making, determined implementation and robust enforcement.”

To read Sue Watt’s trip report to Bardia National Park in Nepal when she went on the trail of the elusive Bengal tiger please click here.

Helping Nepal to deliver on its conservation targets: here.

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Animal welfare award


This video from India is called Anthony Marr: Champion of Bengal Tiger – part 1 of 2.

And this is Anthony Marr: Champion of Bengal Tiger – part 2 of 2.

From Wildlife Extra:

The WVS Animal Champions Award 2014

January 2014: The Worldwide Veterinary Service have launched a new award, the WVS Animal Champions Award 2014 and want your ideas on how they can help make the biggest difference to animals in need, wild or domestic.

The winner of the award will be provided with support to tackle an animal welfare project of their choice. An experienced WVS team will be sent to work on the project for one week and financial support will also be provided for essential materials and equipment. They are therefore seeking applications for projects that the WVS team can achieve during this time frame and that will have a lasting impact to support and sustain animal welfare in your area.

Applications are welcomed from all WVS supported charities and the deadline for applications is 1 February 2014. The winner will be selected and notified in the week commencing 4 February and the project will then take place between February and May.

For more information click HERE.

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