Belgian priest convicted for abusing niece


This video is called Global Response to Priest Sex Abuse.

Translated from Dutch daily Leidsch Dagblad:

Priest convicted for abusing his niece

Published February 6, 2014 18:46 | Last Updated February 6, 2014 18:59

BRUSSELS – This Thursday, a 69-year-old Belgian priest was convicted to a two years suspended prison sentence for sexual abuse of his minor niece. The court in Tongeren in Limburg province in Belgium decided that he must seek treatment for his sexual problems; that for 10 years, he loses his right to vote; and he must pay 3,000 euros in damages.

The man abused the physically disabled daughter of his sister in the period 1993-1999 various times. When he abused her for the first time, his god-daughter was 11 years old. The priest went every week to his sister’s and enjoyed great prestige within the family. According to the judge, the priest in a gross way ​abused the trust which the family had in him.

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German military sexual abuse


This video from the USA says about itself:

Survivors Share Sexual Assault Experiences in the Military

13 March 2013

Women in combat zones are more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by the enemy. Of nearly 4,000 reports of sexual assault in the military last year, only 191 defendants were convicted. Judy Woodruff reports on testimony from male and female sexual assault victims about attacks they suffered while in the military.

In the German armed forces, not only racism, eg, against African Americans; and sexual abuse of male soldiers; but sexual abuse of female soldiers as well.

From The News in Pakistan:

One in two German female soldiers report sexual abuse

Saturday, January 25, 2014

BERLIN: One in two female soldiers in the German military says she has encountered some kind of sexual abuse at least once while in the armed forces, an internal study published on Friday found.

The report, released by the Bundeswehr’s Centre of Military History and Social Studies in the eastern city of Potsdam, prompted new Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen to call for new measures to address problems faced by women in uniform.

Fifty-five per cent of women in the Bundeswehr reported some kind of sexual mistreatment on the job, with 47 per cent citing verbal abuse, 25 per cent saying they had been confronted with pornographic images and 24 per cent telling researchers they had experienced “unwanted sexually motivated physical contact”.

Three per cent said they had suffered sexual assault. Von der Leyen, Germany’s first female defence chief, said the poll conducted in 2011 among 3,058 women showed the military must change the way it deals with its female soldiers, who make up 10.1 per cent of the armed forces. …

However a parallel poll of 1,771 male soldiers showed growing resentment of gender diversity. More than 56 per cent said women made the military worse, up from around 52 per cent in 2005.

Twelve per cent of the male soldiers reported experiencing sexual harassment. Earlier this month, von der Leyen said she would make creating a more family-friendly army a priority during her term by allowing soldiers to work part-time and extending childcare.

US President Barack Obama in December gave the Pentagon a year to confront a scourge of sexual assaults that have sparked calls for commanders to lose the power to adjudicate such crimes.

The US military in August launched a raft of measures to combat sexual assaults, but their action did not appease some lawmakers who want much stronger steps to deal with hundreds of alleged offences from harassment to rape.

Sexual abuse cases in the military are on the rise, according to a Pentagon report, rising to 3,374 in 2012, a six per cent increase from the previous year.

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Dutch ‘justice’ top bureaucrat suspected of raping children


This 2012 video from the USA is called Top Dutch Official Facing Child Rape Allegations, JORIS DEMMINK.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Court: public prosecutor should prosecute Demmink

Update: Tuesday 21 Jan 2014, 13:32

Former top official Joris Demmink should be prosecuted for rape. The court in Arnhem says that the public prosecutor, who previously did not start a criminal investigation, should prosecute anyway.

Demmink, who was until 2012 the Secretary General at the Ministry of Justice, has long been the subject of rumours about the abuse of underage boys. So far, that never led to a criminal court case.

Two Turkish men have now enforced prosecution in an Article 12 procedure at the court. They say they have been raped by Demmink when they were children when he was on mission in Turkey.

If Demmink’s guilt will be proven, then this looks a Dutch parallel of the horrible Jimmy Savile scandal in Britain, which also continued for decades without prosecution.

Demmink is a member of the Right wing VVD party, the party of Dutch Prime Minister Rutte.

Minister of Justice Opstelten (also VVD) said today that he is not sure whether the government will continue to pay Demmink’s lawyer, as is the case so far. A majority in the Dutch parliament says these payments should stop. Some MPs say that Demmink never should have been paid, and that he should give back taxpayers’ money which he received so far.

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Jimmy Savile, knighted by British government and Vatican, ‘abused 1,000 children’


This video from Britain says about itself:

Jimmy Savile & Margaret Thatcher

16 okt 2012

Why were Savile and Thatcher, strange bedfellows however you look at it, so close?

From weekly The Observer in Britain:

Revealed: how Jimmy Savile abused up to 1,000 victims on BBC premises

Executives turned a blind eye to attacks, according to former judge’s ‘shocking’ finding

Daniel Boffey, policy editor

Saturday 18 January 2014 21.24 GMT

The BBC will be plunged into a major crisis with the publication of a damning review, expected next month, that will reveal its staff turned a blind eye to the rape and sexual assault of up to 1,000 girls and boys by Jimmy Savile in the corporation’s changing rooms and studios.

Dame Janet Smith, a former court of appeal judge, who previously led the inquiry into the murders by Dr Harold Shipman, will say in her report that the true number of victims of Savile’s sexual proclivities may never be known but that his behaviour had been recognised by BBC executives who took no action.

Smith’s investigations, which followed the Pollard inquiry into why the BBC shelved a Newsnight programme about Savile, will send shockwaves through the corporation.

A source close to the inquiry told the Observer: “The numbers are shocking. Many hundreds and potentially up to 1,000 people were victims of Savile when he was representing the corporation. The report will overshadow Pollard. It will go right to the heart of how Savile was able to get away with the most heinous of crimes under the very noses of BBC staff for more than 40 years.”

The sheer scale of victims’ testimonies being examined has delayed the publication of Smith’s report by a month.

Peter Saunders, chief executive of the National Association for People Abused in Childhood (Napac), which has been consulted by Smith’s inquiry, said: “In Savile’s lifetime I wouldn’t doubt [that 1,000 people had been abused by him on BBC property]. The other thing I have found extraordinary, and very sad, is the number of people I have spoken to connected to the BBC, and that is a lot of people, who said: ‘Oh yes, we all knew about him.’

“I was talking to someone at BBC Manchester in Salford who said ‘we knew about Stuart Hall. He had a room where he would take women and young people’. You think: ‘Oh my God, these people were offending almost in open sight and no one thought to intervene.’”

Liz Dux, a lawyer representing 74 of Savile’s victims, said Smith had been forensic in her examination of witnesses and her report was likely to cause serious concerns for those at the top of the organisation. She said: “Every single opportunity Savile took it. He never had a quiet day basically so these numbers wouldn’t at all surprise me.

“Dame Janet is very widely respected and I am confident she won’t leave any stones unturned. The clients who gave evidence said that they felt they were listened to very sensitively and sympathetically and were able to give their evidence in a lot of detail. This will not be a what-the-BBC-want sort of report.”

A second report on the scale of Savile’s abuse within the NHS has also been delayed due to the number of places in which Savile committed crimes and it is not expected until June.

Smith has used a similar methodology to that employed during the Shipman inquiry, which found the GP had killed hundreds of patients, not just the 15 for which he received life sentences before taking his own life in his prison cell.

Her team sent letters to every member of BBC staff past and present asking whether they had witnessed criminal acts by Savile in order to piece together his pattern of behaviour and establish an understanding of the scale of his crimes.

In three known cases, one of which involved a BBC cameraman who has since died, Savile carried out his abuse with others connected to the corporation, the review has heard.

The report will, however, express frustration that some of those closest to Savile or culpable for allowing him to go unchallenged have refused to co-operate. His criminality peaked in the 1960s and 1970s, when he was middle-aged and at the height of his career at the corporation, but continued right up until the last filming of Top of the Pops in 2006 when at the age of 79 he groped a girl aged between 13 and 16. Smith’s review has been in contact with more than 1,000 witnesses and victims, including the 138 who are pursuing civil claims for compensation, but the scale of those affected by Savile’s crimes dwarfs the number who have so far come forward.

The Observer understands the BBC has provided more than £10,000 in funding, and the assistance of a business consultant, to Napac to allow it to increase its helpline services. Further money is expected to be made available when the review is published.

Lord Hall, the BBC’s director general, met the charity’s chief executive shortly before Christmas and asked for his support when the Smith report is launched.

Dux hopes the BBC will respond to Smith’s findings by offering further support to the victims, who are due to receive limited compensation through a scheme being agreed with the corporation, the NHS and the Jimmy Savile Charitable Trust. Those raped by Savile are unlikely to receive more than £50,000 in compensation.

Dux, head of abuse cases at Slater & Gordon, said: “What I hope doesn’t happen is that the BBC goes into some sort of navel-gazing period. Rather than look internally, look at how they are behaving and accept some corporate responsibility, which is not what they have done so far.

“I have asked for counselling for my clients who have given statements but the BBC have done nothing; my clients have been left absolutely high and dry.”

If the BBC really cared about these people then they would have contacted them as soon as they have given evidence and said: ‘We accept that you have gone through an awful ordeal and whatever the outcome of the report we have made facilities to let you go and see this counsellor.’”

She added: “Whether these cases are resolved by settlement scheme or by court the amount of damages the victims of the BBC will get is absolutely tiny compared to what they have spent on their own legal fees, the Pollard inquiry and their own staff. The damages for compensation in civil law for rape is rarely over £50,000 and that is something that is life-changing and hideous. They are actually getting an insulting amount”.

A spokesman for Smith’s review declined to comment.

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Vatican criticized about clerical sexual abuse


This video from 2010 is called Ireland – The Vatican Colluded With Paedophile Priests To Cover Up Child Abuse – Aljazeera.

From The Times of Malta:

Thursday, January 16, 2014, 13:57 by PA

UN hits at Vatican over child abuse – Scicluna represents Holy See before high level committee

The Vatican has come under blistering criticism from a UN committee for its handling of the global priest sex abuse scandal, facing its most intense public grilling ever over allegations that it protected paedophile priests at the expense of victims.

Bishop Charles Scicluna, the Vatican’s former sex crimes prosecutor, acknowledged that the Holy See had been slow to face the crisis but said that it was now committed to doing so. He encouraged prosecutors to take action against anyone who obstructs justice – a suggestion that bishops who moved priests from diocese to diocese should be held accountable.

“The Holy See gets it,” Mgr Scicluna told the committee. “Let’s not say too late or not. But there are certain things that need to be done differently.”

He was responding to a grilling by the UN committee over the Holy See’s failure to abide by terms of a treaty that calls for signatories to take all appropriate measures to keep children from harm. Critics allege the church enabled the rape of thousands of children by protecting paedophile priests to defend its reputation.

The committee’s main human rights investigator, Sara Oviedo, was particularly tough, pressing the Vatican on the frequent ways abusive priests were transferred rather than turned in to police. Given the church’s “zero tolerance” policy, she asked, why were there “efforts to cover up and obscure these types of cases”.

Another committee member, Maria Rita Parsi, an Italian psychologist and psychotherapist, pressed further: “If these events continue to be hidden and covered up, to what extent will children be affected?”

The Holy See ratified the convention in 1990 and submitted a first implementation report in 1994. But it didn’t provide progress reports for nearly two decades. It only submitted one in 2012 after coming under criticism following the 2010 explosion of child sex abuse cases in Europe and beyond.

Victims groups and human rights organisations teamed up to press the UN committee to challenge the Holy See on its abuse record, providing written testimony from victims and evidence outlining the global scale of the problem.

Their reports cite case studies in Mexico and Britain, grand jury investigations in the US, and government fact-finding inquiries from Canada to Ireland to Australia that detail how the Vatican’s policies, its culture of secrecy and fear of scandal contributed to the problem.

The Holy See has long insisted that it wasn’t responsible for the crimes of priests committed around the world, saying priests aren’t employees of the Vatican but are rather citizens of countries where they live and subject to local law enforcement. It has maintained that bishops were responsible for the priests in their care, not the pope.

But victims groups and human rights organisations provided the committee with the Vatican’s own documentation showing how it discouraged bishops from reporting abusers to police.

Committee member Jorge Cardona Llorens, a Spanish international law professor, demanded to know how the Vatican would create “specific criteria” for putting children’s interests first, because there weren’t any yet in place.

Mgr Scicluna said the Holy See wanted to be a model for how to protect children and care for victims.

“I think the international community looks up to the Holy See for such guidance. But it’s not only words, it has to be commitment on the ground.”

He added: “The states who are cognizant of obstruction of justice need to take action against citizens of their countries who obstruct justice.” Mgr Scicluna, a Maltese bishop, has previously said bishops who failed to do the right thing with paedophile priests must be held accountable.

“I think it’s time for the church to stop this secrecy,” Teodoro Pulvirenti, who said he was abused by a priest, told The Associated Press in New York. “I believe the church puts too much its reputation before the victims and you know the pain of this abuse that we carry. That’s why I was so excited when I heard about this final meeting between the Vatican representatives and the UN.”

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Scottish clerical sexual abuse scandal


This video is called Sins of Our Fathers – BBC Scotland. It says about itself:

BBC Scotland Broadcast 29 July 2013

The shocking truth of physical and sexual abuse in one of Scotland’s most prestigious Catholic boarding schools.

Mark Daly uncovers the hidden story of Fort Augustus Abbey, the Catholic monks who ran it, and exposes those who turned a blind eye to the horrors within. He hears of stories of abuse that spanned decades and took him to the other side of the world to confront those responsible.

By Malcolm Burns in Britain:

Church criticised for failing abuse victims

Saturday 21st December 2013

Catholic church failing to offer support to victims of physical and sexual abuse

Former pupils criticised the Catholic church in Scotland yesterday for failing to offer support to victims of physical and sexual abuse in two schools.

Three men were reported to Crown Office prosecutors on Thursday in connection with allegations of historic sexual and physical abuse at the Fort Augustus Abbey school and its preparatory school Carlekemp in the Highlands in the 1960s and 70s.

Donald MacLeod, who attended Fort Augustus Abbey school from the age of 14, in the early 1960s, told a BBC documentary team he had expected the church to “live up to their responsibility and do the Christianity thing and help people who in their care have suffered.”

A spokesman for the Catholic church said: “Those who have been affected by events at Fort Augustus have had opportunities to meet and talk with the appropriate people.”

Police Scotland have been investigating the case since March following a report from a former pupil and further allegations which came to light in a BBC documentary in July.

The investigation concerns monks who taught at the former Catholic boarding school.

An 80-year-old man was charged in September.

A Police Scotland spokesman said: “This is very much an ongoing investigation which was initiated by Highland and Islands division in March 2013 and has extended to liaison with a number of law enforcement agencies both across and out with the UK.

“We understand that it is very difficult for victims of abuse to speak about their experiences and a helpline run by Children 1st is available to provide support and advice to those who may be affected by the investigation.”

Japanese World War II forced prostitution and art


By Katherine Brooks in the USA:

11/25/13 EST

The History Of ‘Comfort Women‘: A WWII Tragedy We Can’t Forget

The phrase “comfort women” is a controversial term that refers to approximately 200,000 women who were recruited as prostitutes by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. Many of the young women were forced into servitude and exploited as sex slaves throughout Asia, becoming victims of the largest case of human trafficking in the 20th century.

The trade of comfort women is thus a massive violation of human rights that’s been left out of our textbooks, leaving the individuals embroiled in the atrocious practice to be remembered merely as abstract characters in a taboo history. Korean-born, New York-based artist Chang-Jin Lee seeks to correct this constructed view in “Comfort Women Wanted,” a multimedia exhibition that delves into the personal histories of the Korean, Chinese, Taiwanese, Indonesian, Filipino, and Dutch women whose identities have long been overlooked and misunderstood.

Comfort women

Comfort Women Wanted. Ad-like billboard of a Taiwanese “comfort woman” survivor at The Incheon Women Artists’ Biennale, Korea, 2009. Image courtesy of the artist.

“In Asia, the comfort women issue remains taboo and controversial, while at the same time, it is almost unknown in the West,” Lee explains in a statement about the project. “Human trafficking is the fastest growing industry in the world, and the second largest business after arms dealing in the 21st century. So, the comfort women issue is not just about the past, but it is very relevant today.”

The title of Lee’s show refers to the advertisements found in wartime newspapers; a failed attempt at attracting volunteers into prostitution. Instead, young women as young as 11-years-old were kidnapped and forced into service where they faced rape, torture and extreme violence at military camps known as “comfort stations.”

“Most were teenagers… and were raped by between 10 to 100 soldiers a day at military rape camps,” Lee states on her website. “Women were starved, beaten, tortured, and killed. By some estimates only 25 to 30 percent survived the ordeal.”

Comfort women

Comfort Women Wanted. Video still of a former Japanese soldier during WWII. Image courtesy of the artist.

In an attempt to shine light on this oft-forgotten segment of WWII history, Lee’s exhibit mimics the old advertisements, displaying the real faces of comfort women as they appeared in the 1930s and ’40s, framed by the words of their trade. These striking images are shown alongside stark portraits of the women who are still alive today, many of whom appear in the accompanying video installation. There, Lee interviews individuals she met during travels throughout Asia in 2008, discussing their experiences as comfort women and their modern-day dreams and desires.

In one of the more startling moments of the documentary-like footage, Lee speaks with a former soldier, Yasuji Kaneko, who recounts the terrifying lives of captive women he encountered in hopes “we never repeat what we did in the war and that there will never be war again.

Chelsea

Comfort Women Wanted. Ad-like kiosk poster of a Dutch “comfort woman” survivor in English, with QR Code, in collaboration with The New York City Department of Transportation’s Urban Art Program. Public Art in Chelsea, New York City, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist.

“Comfort Women Wanted” provides a platform for women to expunge their illicit memories while archiving the harsh reality of mid century violence against women. Drenched in red, black and white, the exhibition is a visual overload that makes clear its aim to carve a place in our collective memory, paying tribute to moments that have long been removed from contemporary discussions of truth and justice. At the same time, Lee’s images do more than harken to the past. The portraits foretell a dark future — one that will persist if crimes against women continue to exist only in the murky, deep ends of our shared history.

Lee’s works are currently on view at Wood Street Galleries in Pittsburgh until December 1, 2013. You can see a preview of the exhibition below and a trailer for her video installation here. Let us know your thoughts on the project in the comments.

Comfort women

Comfort Women Wanted. Video still. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ohio

Comfort Women Wanted. Ad-like prints, multichannel video installation, at Spaces Gallery, Cleveland, Ohio, 2011. Image courtesy of the artist.

Fighter

Comfort Women Wanted. Video still of a former Chinese “comfort woman” survivor. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ohio

Comfort Women Wanted. Ad-like billboard of a Taiwanese “comfort woman” survivor, at Spaces Gallery, Cleveland, Ohio, 2011. Image courtesy of the artist.

Bahrain autocracy persecutes human rights defenders


This video is called Bahraini women and children are being raped and tortured.

From the World Organisation Against Torture:

Bahrain: Intensified judicial harassment faced by Mr. Mohammed Al-Maskati and other members of BYSHR

New information
BHR 003 / 0613 / OBS 052.1
Judicial harassment

Bahrain

October 31, 2013

The Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders, a joint programme of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) and the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), has received new information and requests your urgent intervention in the following situation in Bahrain.

New information:

The Observatory has been informed by the Gulf Centre for Human Rights and Bahrain Centre for Human Rights (BCHR) about intensified judicial harassment faced by Mr. Mohammed Al-Maskati, President of the Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights (BYSHR), and other members of BYSHR.

According to the information received, on October 22, 2013, Mr. Mohamed Al-Maskati was summoned to Al-Khamis Police Station where he was interrogated on charges of “inciting hatred against the regime”, based on a speech he made on September 8, 2013 in Jidhafs Town, where he spoke on the concept of non-violence and the importance of peacefully demanding the respect of rights as well as on the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). He was released only after signing a pledge to appear before the Public Prosecution upon request. The police investigation is therefore ongoing.

The Observatory recalls that two other BYSHR members are currently in detention. BYSHR co-founder and blogger Naji Fateel has been detained since May 2013[1] and was sentenced on September 29, 2013 to 15 years in prison for “the establishment of a group for the purpose of disabling the constitution” under Article 6 of the Terrorism Act. His trial on appeal is due to start on November 18, 2013. Mr. Hussain Abdulnabi has been in pre-trial detention since September 6, 2013 on charges of “illegal gathering” and “rioting”. The next hearing will take place on November 7, 2013.

The Observatory condemns these acts of harassment against Mr. Al-Maskati and the arbitrary detention of Messrs. Naji Fateel and Hussain Abdulnabi, which merely aim at curtailing their human rights activities. The Observatory also notes that several human rights defenders remain in arbitrary detention or are subject to judicial harassment in the country.

Background information :

On October 17, 2012, Mr. Al-Maskati appeared before Bahrain’s public prosecution on charges of “participation in illegal protests” in relation to a peaceful gathering held in Manama on October 12, 2012. He had been summoned the day before to Al Hoora police station, where he had been kept overnight before being referred to the prosecutor’s office. He was released on bail on the same October 17, 2012 but charges against him have remained pending since then. On June 19, 2013, Mr. Maskati appeared before the Lower Criminal Court under these same charges Mr. Maskati’s lawyers asked for the case file, and the judge decided to adjourn the case to July 9, 2013 and then to December 9, 2013 .

Previously, on September 23, 2012, Mr. Al-Maskati and other Bahraini human rights defenders who had cooperated with the United Nations (UN) had received threats of reprisals while they were in Geneva to participate in the 21st session of the UN Human Rights Council. Mr. Al-Maskati was notably threatened with death through more than a dozen anonymous phone calls.

Mr. Naji Fateel was arrested without warrant by security men in civilian clothes at his home in the village of Bani-Jamra at dawn of May 2, 2013 and held incommunicado for three days, during which time it is reported that he was severely tortured. He was allegedly subjected to severe torture at the Criminal Investigation Directorate. According to reports he was subjected to electrical shocks to his genitals, left foot and back in addition to simulated drowning, severe beatings, threats to publish his wife’s photographs (taken from a camera confiscated by the security forces when his house was raided), verbal abuse using uncivilized words, hanging by his hands from the ceiling, sexual harassment and threats of rape, standing for hours, and sleep deprivation. He was taken to the Ministry of Interior hospital twice for treatment due to the torture.

Mr. Fateel had been arrested last year on February 14, 2012 while he was participating in a peaceful march toward the Pearl Roundabout area, the now restricted centre of the 2011 protests for rights and democracy. He was previously detained between December 2007 and April 2009, a period during which he was also reportedly tortured.

On May 22, 2013, Naji Fateel was sentenced to six months imprisonment on charges of attending illegal gatherings. He was charged in another case with the establishment of a group for the purpose of disabling the Constitution under Article 6 of the controversial Terrorism Act.

Actions requested:

Please write to the authorities of Bahrain urging them to:

i. Guarantee in all circumstances the physical and psychological integrity of Messrs. Mohammed Al-Maskati, Naji Fateel and Hussain Abdulnabi and all human rights defenders in Bahrain;

ii. Release Messrs. Naji Fateel and Hussain Abdulnabi immediately and unconditionally as their detention is arbitrary since it only aims at sanctioning their human rights activities;

iii. Order an immediate, thorough, transparent investigation into the allegations of torture and ill-treatment against Mr. Naji Fateel, in order to identify all those responsible, bring them before an independent tribunal, and apply them the sanctions provided by the law;

iv. Put an end to all acts of harassment – including at the judicial level – against Messrs. Mohammed Al-Maskati, Naji Fateel and Hussain Abdulnabi as well as all human rights defenders in Bahrain;

v. Conform with the provisions of the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on December 9, 1998, in particular its Article 1, which provides that “everyone has the right, individually and in association with others, to promote and to strive for the protection and realisation of human rights and fundamental freedoms at the national and international levels”, Article 11, which states that “everyone has the right, individually and in association with others, to the lawful exercise of his or her occupation or profession”, Article 12(1) that provides “everyone has the right, individually and in association with others, to participate in peaceful activities against violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms”, as well as Article 12.2, which provides that “the State shall take all necessary measures to ensure the protection by the competent authorities of everyone, individually or in association with others, against any violence, threats, retaliation, de facto or de jure adverse discrimination, pressure or any other arbitrary action as a consequence of his or her legitimate exercise of the rights referred to in the present Declaration”;

vi. Ensure in all circumstances respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms in accordance with international human rights standards and international instruments ratified by Bahrain.

Addresses:

· Cheikh Hamad bin Issa AL KHALIFA, King of Bahrain, Fax: +973 176 64 587

· Cheikh Khaled Bin Ahmad AL KHALIFA, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Tel: +973 172 27 555; fax: +973 172 12 6032

· Cheikh Khalid bin Ali AL KHALIFA, Minister of Justice and Islamic Affairs, Tel: +973 175 31 333; fax: +973 175 31 284

· Permanent Mission of Bahrain to the United Nations in Geneva, 1 chemin Jacques-Attenville, 1218 Grand-Saconnex, CP 39, 1292 Chambésy, Switzerland. Fax: + 41 22 758 96 50. Email: mailto:info@bahrain-mission.ch

***

Paris-Geneva, October 31, 2013

Kindly inform us of any action undertaken quoting the code of this appeal in your reply.

The Observatory, a FIDH and OMCT venture, is dedicated to the protection of Human Rights Defenders and aims to offer them concrete support in their time of need.

To contact the Observatory, call the emergency line:

E-mail: Appeals@fidh-omct.org

· Tel and fax FIDH: + 33 (0) 1 43 55 25 18 / +33 1 43 55 18 80

Tel and fax OMCT: + 41 (0) 22 809 49 39 / + 41 22 809 49 29

[1] See Joint Press Release, June 21, 2013.

Bahrain Center For Human Rights Launches Campaign To End Impunity (VIDEO): here.