One law for Bahraini royals, another law for non-royal women


This video is called Government of Bahrain torturing detained in prison until death.

In Bahrain, there is one law for the royal family, and quite another law for commoners.

From eTurboNews:

Bahraini prince arrested for being drunk and disorderly on BA flight

July 29, 2012

So much for Ramadan… A drunk Arab prince was threatened with 50,000-volt Tasers by gun cops after trying to storm the flight deck of a British Airways jet.

The billionaire, 28 — who was sozzled by 10am — had jumped up from his £2,700 First Class seat to complain to the captain about “poor” service before the Boeing 777 took off from Heathrow to Bahrain.

Crew members called armed cops, who pointed stun guns at the prince after he refused to calm down.

The royal — said to be a close relative of Bahrain’s King Hamed bin Isa Al Khalifa — was hauled off Flight BA125 and taken to the West London airport’s police station. The prince had his DNA, mugshot and fingerprints taken before being released on bail.

A passenger said: “We were terrified when the armed police came on and started pointing Tasers at him.”

A BA spokesman confirmed a customer “was off-loaded from the London to Bahrain service” and appeared to be “intoxicated”. Scotland Yard said a man was arrested on suspicion of being drunk and disorderly.

From Digital Journal:

The consumption of alcohol is allowed in Bahrain, but only for non-Muslims. In 2010 the Shura Council approved a ban on all Muslims drinking alcohol in the tiny Gulf state. Under Bahraini law the penalty for a Muslim drinking alcohol is a three-year jail sentence. However, Gulf royals often flout the Islamic rules they impose on their subjects, indulging in alcohol and other prohibited activities.

Now, about non-royals.

From International Business Times:

Bahrain: Woman Charged With Smoking in the Day During Ramadan

By Ludovica Iaccino

July 9, 2014 14:39 BST

A woman has been charged with insulting Ramadan as she smoked a cigarette during daylight hours while she was being questioned at Bahrain International Airport.

According to Gulf Daily News, the 32-year-old Egyptian woman, whose name was not disclosed, was stopped by the airport’s officers who wanted to search her luggage.

As she refused, the officers escorted her to the lieutenant’s office for questioning.

The woman allegedly insulted the lieutenant, knocked off his hat and then smoked a cigarette.

“I had a cigarette as I was not fasting because I was travelling,” the woman said in her statement to prosecutors.

“I needed to travel back to my home country for Ramadan and I was late to board my flight.

“I accidentally knocked off the policeman’s hat because I was waving my hands around trying to explain to him that I was late for my flight and that’s why I did not want a thorough examination of my luggage.”

As well as smoking a cigarette during daylight hours, the woman was also charged with insulting a police officer.

She was released on 500 Bahrain dinar (£775; $1326) bail by the Lower Criminal Court.

The trial was adjourned until 14 July.

Nabeel Rajab: ‘Bahrain Has Turned into Dictatorship Kingdom‘.

Britain: Home Office Poised to Deport Bahraini Teen Isa Haider Alaali Despite Torture and Imprisonment Risk.

Bahrain Strengthens Punishment for Insulting King Hamad: here.

A visiting American government official was ordered to leave Bahrain immediately after he met with a few prominent Shi’ite opposition leaders earlier this week: here.

Bahrain should immediately drop charges against two prominent opposition members for meeting with a US diplomat on July 6, 2014. Bahrain should repeal the law that bars leaders of political societies from meeting with foreign diplomats without government permission: here.

Amnesty International issued the following Urgent Action yesterday on behalf of Dr. Sa’eed Mothaher Habib Al-Samahiji, who is to serve a one-year sentence for “publicly insulting the King of Bahrain”. Dr. Sa’eed Al-Samahiji is a prisoner of conscience and jailed solely for exercising his right to freedom of expression: here.

Bahrain: Deteriorating Human Rights Situation: here.

Bahrain’s recent expulsion of a U.S. State Department official after visiting with a Shiite opposition leader was the result of pressure from Saudi Arabia, indicating relations between the U.S. and Riyadh are further deteriorating: here.

English PEN has joined a coalition of 29 NGOs to call on the newly appointed Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond to reassess the Foreign Office position on Bahrain as a matter of urgency. Read the full text of the letter here.

Spanish republicans organize referendum on monarchy


This video is called Spaniards insist: ‘Referendum now’.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Spanish activists launch street referendum over future of monarchy

Unofficial poll in days before coronation of Prince Felipe will ask Spaniards if they want an elected head of state

Ashifa Kassam in Madrid

Friday 13 June 2014 11.23 BST

Emboldened by the tens of thousands of Spaniards who have taken to the streets to demand a say in the future of Spain‘s monarchy, activist groups have announced they will be holding their own referendum in the five days leading up to the coronation of Prince Felipe.

The idea came about on the night King Juan Carlos announced his abdication, after an estimated 20,000 people dressed in the red, yellow and purple of the former Spanish republic descended upon the Puerta del Sol square in Madrid calling for an end to the monarchy.

“It seems absurd to us that in a democracy nobody is asking the citizens if they want a monarchy or a republic,” said Kike Castelló of ¡Democracia Real Ya! (Real Democracy Now!), one of the dozen or so collectives involved in organising the referendum.

The referendum will begin on Saturday morning and run until 19 June, the day of the coronation. About 60 polling stations staffed by volunteers will be set up along major streets in cities across the country, with voting also taking place online.

A recent poll for El País found that 62% of Spaniards believe a referendum on the monarchy should be held “at some point”. Nearly half, said the poll, would prefer a monarchy headed by Felipe, while 36% would support a republic.

Participants will be asked to answer yes or no to two questions: whether they agree that the head of Spain should be elected and if they agree that a constitutional process should be opened so that citizens can decide how the Spanish state is governed.

“We just want people to express their opinion – whether it’s for a monarchy or for a republic. We want to hear what Spaniards want for their country,” said Castelló.

He brushed aside concerns about the legality of the referendum. “Asking people for their thoughts isn’t illegal,” he said, pointing to a line in the Spanish constitution that stipulates that “transcendent decisions can be put to a consultative referendum”.

Under Spanish law, he added, permission is not needed for this kind of initiative. The only obligation is that those setting up polling stations notify the delegate from the central government in the region. The necessary forms are provided on the group’s website, he said.

Measures are being put into place to avoid people voting more than once, said Eduardo Robles Elvira, who is working on the technical aspects of the poll. Independent organisations are being recruited to monitor and tally the results. “We’re doing all of this so that it’s the most transparent and legitimate referendum possible,” he said.

The group has yet to decide what exactly they will do with the results, said Castelló. “We know that the government isn’t going to say, ‘hey, look how many people want a republic, let’s do that.” He said he saw the effort to take the pulse of the streets as more symbolic than anything else. “We want people to realise that it’s possible for us to have a say in how our country is run.”

The plebiscite is open to Spaniards living anywhere in the world, and a group in Paris has signed up to host a polling station on the streets of the French capital. “Spaniards are the ones who will be affected by this monarchy. If you want one as well for the British, we can organise one for your Queen,” Castelló joked. “But that might seem a bit weird.”

More than 85% of the Spanish parliament on Wednesday voted to move forward with the law that will pave the way for the crown to be handed from King Juan Carlos to Prince Felipe. The law will now move to the Spanish senate where it is expected to be approved early next week.

As leftist deputies waved signs calling for a referendum, Mariano Rajoy, the prime minister, defended the monarchy during the debate, saying: “Spain is a parliamentary monarchy with deep roots because Spaniards want it to be so.”