Belgian king shoots elephants and deer


This video is called The Elephant Documentary.

Translated from Vroege Vogels radio in the Netherlands:

September 30, 2014 18:06

Again, the Belgian King Philip is under fire. He was first the subject of a public debate because he hunted elephants, now it’s because he wants to shoot sixty hinds. These animals run around in a field in the Ardennes that is his property. The Belgian authorities apparently have given him permission for that.

On Monday, the Belgian monarch, incognito, took a look in a gun shop to buy a new weapon. His visit, after it was recorded by a photographer, led to a stream of criticism.

Global awareness of animal welfare or not; Philip must and will organize his traditional hunts each year. Mid-October is the time, and his guest list consists entirely of family.

Bahraini prince may be prosecuted for torture


This video says about itself:

7 October 2014

Prince Nasser of Bahrain is not immune from prosecution over allegations of torture, the UK’s High Court has ruled.

Prince Nasser bin Hamad al-Khalifa has been accused of being involved in the torture of prisoners during a pro-democracy uprising in Bahrain in 2011.

Judges overturned a ruling by UK prosecutors that the prince had state immunity from prosecution.

From Reuters news agency:

Bahrain prince does not enjoy immunity over torture claims, UK court rules

Tue, Oct 7, 2014

LONDON – A British court ruled on Tuesday that Bahraini Prince Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa, who has been accused of torturing detainees in Bahrain, does not enjoy immunity from prosecution in Britain.

A Bahraini citizen, known only as FF, had sought the arrest of the son of Bahrain’s king following allegations that he was directly involved in the torture of three prisoners in Bahrain during a pro-democracy uprising in 2011.

FF, who says he himself was tortured, was granted refugee status and now lives in Britain. He was challenging a 2012 ruling by Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) that the prince enjoys immunity from prosecution in Britain because of his royal status.

Prince Nasser is a regular visitor to England and has met members of the British royal family. FF had instructed a firm of London lawyers to write to the CPS asking for him to be arrested whilst on a visit to the UK.

After Tuesday’s High Court ruling, lawyers for FF said they would provide evidence against the prince to London’s Metropolitan Police Service. …

(Reporting by Ahmed Aboulenein; editing by Stephen Addison)

See also here. And here.

Americans for Democracy and Human Rights and Bahrain (ADHRB) and the Bahrain Institute for Rights and Democracy (BIRD) welcome the decision by the UK High Court to lift the immunity from Bahrain’s Prince Nasser Bin Hamad Al Khalifa for prosecution against torture allegations: here.

Potential torture investigation of Bahraini prince puts IOC and AFC on the spot: here.

Since the 1970s, Bahrain and the U.S. have maintained a close military partnership. Following 9/11, the Bush Administration elevated Bahrain to “major non-NATO ally” status, making it the first GCC state to join this elite 15-member club: here.

King Richard III of England, how he died


This 2013 video from England is called Richard III – The Violent Death of the King in the Car Park.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Richard III died in battle after losing helmet, new research shows

Detailed scans of bones show that he sustained 11 wounds at or near the time of his death, nine of them to the skull

Tuesday 16 September 2014 23.35 BST

Richard III died in the thick of battle after losing his helmet and coming under a hail of blows from vicious medieval weapons, new research has shown. Detailed scans of the king’s bones show that he sustained 11 wounds at or near the time of his death, nine of them to the skull.

The blows to the head were clearly inflicted in battle and suggest that he was not wearing his helmet.

There was another potentially fatal injury to the pelvis that may have been inflicted after death.

Professor Guy Rutty, from the University of Leicester, said: “The most likely injuries to have caused the king’s death are the two to the inferior aspect of the skull – a large sharp force trauma possibly from a sword or staff weapon, such as a halberd or bill, and a penetrating injury from the tip of an edged weapon.

“Richard’s head injuries are consistent with some near-contemporary accounts of the battle, which suggest that Richard abandoned his horse after it became stuck in a mire and was killed while fighting his enemies.”

Richard III, the last English monarch to die fighting, perished at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. It was the last significant battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the Houses of Lancaster and York, and paved the way for the Tudor dynasty.

Scientists and historians have been studying the king’s remains since his skeleton was found under a car park in Leicester.

Evidence suggests he was not the hunchbacked, deformed monstrosity depicted by William Shakespeare.

Experts now know he had a bent spine with a “well balanced curve” that could easily have been concealed by clothing and would not have affected his prowess in battle. He probably did not walk with a limp.

The latest research, published in The Lancet medical journal’s online edition, involved whole body CT (computed tomography) X-ray scans and micro-CT imaging.

Marks left on the bones by weapons were also analysed.

The serious injury to the pelvis should have been prevented by Richard’s armour, according to the researchers. They speculate that it might have been inflicted after death, with the armour removed.

Co-author Professor Sarah Hainsworth, also from the University of Leicester, said: “Richard’s injuries represent a sustained attack or an attack by several assailants with weapons from the later medieval period.

“The wounds to the skull suggest that he was not wearing a helmet, and the absence of defensive wounds on his arms and hands indicate that he was otherwise still armoured at the time of his death.”

Commenting on the study, Dr Heather Bonney from the Natural History Museum in London said the research provided a “compelling account” of the way Richard III met his death.

She added: “Wherever his remains are again laid to rest, I am sure that Richard III will continue to divide opinion fiercely for centuries to come.”

See also here.

Yorkists fear elaborate King Richard III reburial could reignite War of the Roses: here.