Save a rhino, clip your fingernails


In this video, Marjo Hoedemaker (founder of the Marjo Hoedemaker Elephant Foundation) from the Netherlands speaks in Amersfoort zoo.

He says that in Vietnam and other countries, some people believe that rhino horn can cure cancer. This leads to poachers killing rhinos.

This quackery is nonsense. Rhino horn is the same stuff as human fingernails and toenails: keratin.

Marjo Hoedemaker proposes that people bring their clipped fingernails to Amersfoort zoo, starting on 1 December. A bin to collect the nails will then be next to the zoo’s rhino enclosure. As soon as Marjo will have five kilogram of keratin, he intends to bring it to the embassy of Vietnam in the Netherlands. The embassy may then send it to believers in Vietnam in the healing powers of rhino horn; thus saving rhino’s lives.

A pedicurist and other people have already said they will help.

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos, 4 October


This video is called Global march for elephants and rhinos.

From Wildlife Extra:

The world stands up for rhinos and elephants

On Saturday 4th October, which is World Animal Day, the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos will take place and is set to be the biggest ever global movement on behalf of animals.

Thousands of people will take to the streets in 130 cities around the world to raise awareness of the plight faced by these critically endangered animals.

The Global March for Elephants and Rhinos will aim to achieve the implementation of tougher penalties for wildlife crime, a full worldwide ban on the trade of ivory and rhino horn, and the strengthening of law enforcement in consumer countries and range states. In addition, they will also make the demand that ivory and rhino shops and carving factories are shut down immediately.

A number of celebrities have supported the march with messages, including David Attenborough, Richard Branson, Jane Goodall, Stephen Fry, Damon Albarn, Bill Bailey, Twiggy, Joanna Lumley, and others.

The marches will take place in key cities across the US, South America, Africa, Europe, and Asia. In the UK there will be marches in Bristol, Birmingham, and Edinburgh as well as in London.

Maria Mossman from Action4Elephants is co-organising the London march. She says: “We’re just ordinary people who care about these extraordinary animals. It would be devastating and criminal if elephants and rhinos went extinct within 20 years, but that is the frightening reality. It could happen. It will happen, if something isn’t done. The Global March for Elephants and Rhinos is a way for people around the world to show that we’re not going to accept it.”

Care for the Wild International will be supporting the event. The charity’s CEO Philip Mansbridge commented on the marches taking place around the world: “By backing the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos, we’re saying it’s not just our problem, it’s your problem. Everyone. Who among us wasn’t amazed the first time we saw a picture of an elephant or a rhino? But beyond the sentiment, these animals are vital to the planet, and it’s vital to us as a species that we save them, otherwise we’ve failed. So please take to the streets on October 4th to show that we all care.”

The London march starts at 1pm in Cavendish Square, and finishes at 3pm in Parliament Square.

For more information, see here and here.

Good tiger, rhino, elephant news from Nepal


This video says about itself:

Wildlife encounters on safari in Nepal at the … Bardia National Park. Wild elephants, one-horned rhinoceros, and amazing encounters and charges by the Royal Bengal Tiger.

From Wildlife Extra:

Nepal celebrates zero poaching year

March 2014: Celebrations are running high in Nepal because for the second time in recent years it has achieved a major milestone in conservation, a zero poaching of tigers, rhinos and elephants for the period February 2013-February 2014. (The last time was in 2011).

At a time when tigers and rhinos are being rampantly poached around the world, this success it is a great reward for the country’s work and commitment to combating wildlife crime, and resounds hope for wildlife.

“The success of achieving zero poaching throughout the year is a huge achievement and a result of prioritising a national need to curb wildlife crimes in the country,” says Megh Bahadur Pandey, Director General of Nepal’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation. “A national level commitment is key to encouraging complementing efforts, right down to the grassroots level, in order to address this biggest threat to wildlife not just in Nepal but across the world.”

It is due to strengthened protection and enforcement efforts across the country, led by the government and supported by its conservation partners such as WWF and the National Trust for Nature Conservation. The newly developed Wildlife Crime Control Bureau and the establishment of its 16 district cells together with the Central Investigation Bureau of Nepal Police has also helped create the needed balance between central and local level enforcement to curb wildlife crimes.

“It is a matter of great pride to mark the first World Wildlife Day with the announcement of a year of zero poaching in Nepal,” says Anil Manandhar, Country Representative of WWF Nepal. “We are committed to work with the government, conservation partners and the local communities to redouble efforts to sustain this success.”

“We congratulate Nepal on reducing poaching to zero within its borders,” says Yolanda Kakabadse, President of WWF International. “This achievement serves as a model for WWF’s goal for drastically reducing wildlife crime worldwide – with a combination of brave policy making, determined implementation and robust enforcement.”

To read Sue Watt’s trip report to Bardia National Park in Nepal when she went on the trail of the elusive Bengal tiger please click here.

Helping Nepal to deliver on its conservation targets: here.

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