Canadian squirrel steals camera and films


This video is called A squirrel nabbed my GoPro and carried it up a tree (and then dropped it).

From the Daily Telegraph in Britain about this video:

Cheeky squirrel steals a GoPro camera

Footage of an inquisitive squirrel stealing a GoPro camera and dragging it up a tree has gone viral online

17 Nov 2014

You don’t always need the high-production values of David Attenborough‘s Life Story, a team of experienced wildlife cameramen and the patience of a saint to put together an impressive animal video.

As the clip above demonstrates, sometimes you just need a GoPro camera and a slice of bread.

Montreal resident David Freiheit left his camera, with bait attached, at the base of a tree and stood nearby as an inquisitive squirrel approached.

The cheeky animal then dragged the camera up the tree, inadvertently filming Mr Freiheit in the process. Upon realising that the GoPro was not particularly tasty, the squirrel then jettisoned the camera onto the pavement below.

After being published on YouTube, Mr Freiheit’s footage has been viewed over 600,000 times. Completely nuts.

North American orchid discovery in the Netherlands


This video, in French, is about Spiranthes lucida orchids growing on the ‘île de Montréal island in Quebec, Canada.

Spiranthes lucida, shining lady’s tresses, is a North American orchid, never seen in Europe.

At least not until June this year, in a nature reserve near the Lek river in the Netherlands.

27 Spiranthes lucida orchids were discovered there, twelve of them flowering.

How did these flowers get here? This orchid species is not sold in commercial plant trade. So, not feral. Seeds brought here accidentally with trade in other products? Brought here by a migratory bird?

Tropical butterflies in Quebec


Giant swallowtail

From AFP news agency today:

Tropical butterfly discovered in Quebec a sign of warming

2 hours ago

MONTREAL — Caterpillars belonging to a species of butterfly previously unknown as far north as Canada have been discovered in Montreal, in a sign that this country’s cool climate is warming, researchers said Monday.

The city’s botanical garden and insectarium said the giant swallowtail butterflies (Papilio cresphontes Cramer) were recently found for the first time on a prickly ash plant there.

“The butterfly’s arrival in Montreal is a very clear example of the impact of climate change,” said a statement.

“In recent decades, milder temperatures in Nordic zones have enabled it to survive the winter and colonize new habitats. Giant swallowtails have gradually moved into Quebec, and the first native chrysalises are about to undergo metamorphosis at the botanical garden any day now!”

Giant swallowtails normally live in Central and South America. Starting in the late 1990s, they began showing up in North America as far north as the southern tip of Canada.

While other butterfly species are also edging northward at a rate of 16 kilometers (10 miles) per decade, the giant swallowtail is moving into new habitats at a rate 15 times faster than average.

Its range now extends a full 400 kilometers (248.5 miles) into areas previously too inhospitable to support a viable population.

With a wingspan of up to 15 cm, or the size of a dinner plate, it is the largest butterfly in North America.

Climate change is driving British wildlife northwards, scientists claim: here.

The warming ocean is significantly changing Australia’s marine ecosystems, with tropical fish appearing as far south as Tasmania and the feeding habits of seabirds changing in the Southern Ocean: here.