World War I poets on stage


This theatre video from England is called Pat Barker‘s Regeneration adapted by Nicholas Wright.

By Peter Frost in Britain:

Anthem for souls in conflict

Thursday 18th September 2014

Peter Frost recommends Regeneration, a dark vision of the psychological horrors endured by soldiers in WWI

Regeneration, Royal and Derngate Theatre, Northampton

4/5

Novelist Pat Barker won a Booker prize for The Ghost Road, the third book in her Regeneration trilogy set in the first world war.

Now Nicholas Wright has adapted the novels for the stage and the result is thought-provoking and disturbing.

Virtually all the action takes place in the Craiglockhart war hospital in Scotland — a sombre asylum for officers with shell-shock — in 1917.

Soldier-poet Siegfried Sassoon (Tim Delap) has been sent there ostensibly because he is insane but in reality the War Office has put him away to discredit his anti-war poems and pronouncements.

Army psychiatrist Doctor William Rivers, beautifully played by Stephen Boxer, has the job of curing the shell-shocked officers, suffering from what is now understood to be post-traumatic stress disorder — or at least getting them fit enough to return to the trenches.

His sessions with Sassoon force him to consider the morality of what he is doing in the name of medicine. Some of the treatments employed are little short of torture.

We witness Sassoon and Wilfred Owen (Garmon Rhys) tussling over one of the latter’s poems — Anthem for Doomed Youth — before both men decide to return to the front.

Sassoon, Rivers and Owen are all drawn from history but the one individual who provides a more realistic view of the madness of war is the fictional character of grammar school boy Billy Prior (Jack Monaghan) from the “lower orders.”

A compelling look at the futility of war, the play is a reminder too that even in the horror of an asylum the officer class still get a round of golf in or take dinner at the Conservative club.

Sassoon, wounded by friendly fire, would live until the 1960s while Owen died exactly one week before the war ended.

His mother received the fateful telegram just as the church bells in her village started ringing out to celebrate victory.

A bitter irony, entirely in keeping with this commendable production.

Runs until September 20, box office: royalandderngate.co.uk, then tours nationwide.

Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner poem on stage


This video from Britain says about itself:

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge ~ Full Version

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (originally The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere) is the longest major poem by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, written in 1797–98 and published in 1798 in the first edition of Lyrical Ballads.

By Indianna Purcell in England:

Memorable rebranding of Coleridge

Saturday 13th September 2014

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
South Bank Centre, London SE1

5/5

IT WOULD seem that there’s nothing too ambitious for Britain’s darkest warbling cult trio The Tiger Lillies. And thank goodness for that as their latest project — premiered in France over two years ago — is one of their most spellbinding shows in recent times.

Having embarked on projects such as transforming WWI poetry into songs or a macabre classic German children’s book into an even more sinister musical, The Tiger Lillies now take on Samuel Coleridge’s epic poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

Along with Mark Holthusen’s stunning visual effects, they transform it into a unique, haunting and effortlessly graceful stage production.

Coleridge’s eerie crime-and-punishment classic recounts the tale of a mariner who narrates his nightmare sea voyage where, having shot an albatross, he’s forced to wear it round his neck in penance by his fellow sailors, who ultimately all perish.

In bringing that morbid tale to life, lead singer and accordionist extraordinaire Jacques grimaces through his usual glass-breaking vocal range, with many of the 20 seductive songs sounding sombre in comparison to the Lillies’ usual circus-style cabaret tracks.

In contrast with many of their shows where the group perform on a stage with minimal visual effects, relying more on their own startling stage presence, this time they perform behind a screen of animated handmade puppets. It’s a puppet theatre which they memorably transform into a work of nightmarish art.

Poem about World War I, by Attila the Stockbroker


This video is called Attila the Stockbroker – A Centenary War Poem For My Father Bill Baine, 1899 – 1968.

By poet Attila the Stockbroker from Britain:

Cheers for proud Hull, punking about in Brussels and a poem

Saturday 13th September 2014

On the road with Attila the Stockbroker

LAST weekend I was on at the Freedom Festival in Hull, and what a wonderfully organised and vibrant event it was.

Set in the old streets of the historic port area and featuring loads of diverse bands, poets, dancers — you name it — all washed down with a fine selection of local beers and food from all over the world.

Hull is Britain’s City of Culture for 2017 and has had a vibrant scene for years. It also hosts my favourite venue the Adelphi, basically a hollowed-out terraced house next to a bomb site. It’s been presided over for 30 years by the indefatigable and inspirational Paul “Jacko” Jackson and spawned loads of household names in the independent music scene from the Housemartins to Pulp to Death by Milkfloat, to name but a few.

What d’you mean, you haven’t heard of Death by Milkfloat? Legends, comrades, legends.

Best T shirt of that weekend: “Welcome to Hull, European City of Culture 2017. We’re not shit any more.” You never were, Hull, you’re great.

This music video from Belgium is the song Nuit blanche, by the band Contingent.

I’ve just been playing bass in Brussels with Contingent, the punk band I joined there in 1979. They still gig occasionally — and incendiarally — and we’re supporting Sham 69 at a celebration of the 20th anniversary of Magasin 4, the alternative venue set up by our late, great guitarist Eric Lemaitre. Belgian beer awaits in vats – and then I’m off with my wife for a week’s holiday in Marseille.

I wanted to use this poem in my column at the actual anniversary of the start of world War I, but so much was going on gig-wise then that I decided to hold it back for the relatively relaxed few weeks between the end of the festival season and the start of my autumn touring, where it could have pride of place.

It is a true and unusual story — and a poem from the heart.

A Centenary War Poem

For my father, Bill Baine

“What passing-bells for those who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.”
And so some lines to spike centenary prattle:
These words a sole survivor soldier’s son’s.

My father Bill, born in Victorian England:
The sixth of January, 1899.
His stock, loyal London. Proletarian doff-cap.
Aged seventeen, he went to join the line.

Not in a war to end all wars forever
Just in a ghastly slaughter at the Somme
A pointless feud, a royal family squabble
Fought by their proxy poor with gun and bomb.

My father saved. Pyrexia, unknown origin.
Front line battalion: he lay sick in bed.
His comrades formed their line, then came the whistle
And then the news that every one was dead.

In later life a polished comic poet
No words to us expressed that awful fear
Although we knew such things were not forgotten.
He dreamed Sassoon: he wrote Belloc and Lear.

When I was ten he died, but I remember,
Although just once, he’d hinted at the truth.
He put down Henry King and Jabberwocky
And read me Owen’s “Anthem For Doomed Youth”.

“What passing-bells for those who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.”
And so some lines to spike Gove’s mindless prattle:

These words a sole survivor soldier’s son’s.

William Shakespeare sonnet on building


Shakespeare sonnet on building, 8 September 2014

There are poems on various buildings in Leiden city in the Netherlands. This one, in the inner city, is William Shakespeare‘s Sonnet XXX.

Shakespeare sonnet, 8 September 2014

These are cellphone photos.

Shakespeare’s Hamlet, played by actress Maxine Peake


This video from England says about itself:

21 mei 2013

Interview with Maxine Peake: Interview at MIF13 Launch. Maxine talks about her one-women performance in The Masque Of Anarchy at MIF13. Read more here.

By Peter Lazenby in Britain:

We aspire to give women the confidence to take on whatever role they choose

Thursday 4th September 2014

Maxine Peake talks to Peter Lazenby about playing the traditionally male role of Hamlet at Manchester’s Royal Exchange theatre.

It’s no surprise that Manchester’s Royal Exchange has extended its run of Hamlet with Maxine Peake playing the role of Shakespeare’s tragic hero.

It opens next week and the actor, a long-time friend of the Morning Star, has won widespread acclaim for tackling the role. There’s a big demand for tickets.

It’s caused her a few bumps and bruises as well. That, too, will raise no eyebrows among those who know her. When she takes on a role she does so “full on,” she says.

She did it in 2012 when she performed Percy “Red” Shelley’s 91-stanza poem The Masque Of Anarchy. It was written in response to the 1819 slaughter of protesters in Manchester’s infamous Peterloo Massacre, when sabre-wielding Hussars rose into a peaceful crowd of 60,000 listening to speakers calling for greater democracy and freedom.

To the public, of course, Peake has many faces — those of the characters she has portrayed in a wide range of TV series. They include Dinnerladies, Silk, The Village and Shameless, along with her performance as Myra Hindley in See No Evil: The Moors Murders. The list goes on.

But there’s always a freshness to her work, maybe because it is influenced by her deeply held political beliefs.

Peake is a socialist and is not afraid to speak out, particularly in voicing her disgust at the coalition government’s austerity measures and attacks on working people.

Now she is breaking more new ground as a woman actor taking on the traditionally male role of Hamlet. It’s never been her desire to play the Prince of Denmark, she says, “but it has always been my ambition to play a male part in a production. I don’t look at a role in terms of its gender, just whether I identify with the character or not.”

So why is she doing it? “I had done a production with Sarah Frankcom, our wonderful director, three years ago in which I played the title role in Strindberg’s Miss Julie and it was quite a success for the theatre,” she tells me.

“So we sat down and put our heads together to think of another project. We wanted something different that would stretch and challenge us both to the limit. Hamlet seemed perfect.”

It is “a mountain of a play, very physically demanding and challenging,” she says. “The design is very cool and minimal with a quite extraordinary use of light.”

Peake’s commitment to her audiences is total and she wants them to take a clear interpretation and accessible version of the play with them when they leave the theatre. “Hopefully it’ll be a Hamlet they can relate to. But mainly I hope that they feel they got their money’s worth and had a full theatrical experience.”

The theatre, as does virtually all the media, suffers badly from gender imbalance and for Peake playing Hamlet is part of the process to redress that. “There is a real sea-change in the gender balance in theatre,” she explains. “The Exchange I think is leading that process. The imbalance has gone on now far too long and it’s so exciting that companies are having a go at tackling it. It’s still not enough but I hope that our Hamlet will help with that.

“In years to come women will be playing these roles and no-one will be questioning it and we aspire to give women the confidence to take on whatever role they choose.

“Hopefully people will now start to tackle the race issue that I feel is still a problem in theatre and television and we’ll start to do more colour-blind casting and begin to represent honestly the wonderful racial diversity of our country.”

Peake chooses to live in the region of her birth – she was born in Bolton in Lancashire and now lives in Salford — rather than London.

In addition to acting she is an accomplished writer and her work has included a play for BBC Radio 4 about the courageous women who staged an underground occupation of a Lancashire colliery in protest at pit closures in 1993.

The Royal Exchange has made her an associate artist, with a wide-ranging role. What does she hope to achieve now?

“I will be writing as a part of my new role,” she says. “I have an idea but what it is I can’t tell you yet I’m afraid. I will be mentoring some young actors on a project next year who have been cast from the local community.

“I am really excited. I think the Royal Exchange is a thoroughly modern theatre that is responding to its surroundings and the times we live in. Up the revolution!”

Such enthusiasm is positively infectious.

Hamlet runs from September 11-October 25, details: royalexchange.co.uk.

Amsterdam, Netherlands solidarity with Ferguson, USA


This video from the Netherlands says about itself:

Jennifer Tosch gives speech and reads poem during Ferguson demonstration in Amsterdam

25 August 2014

Jennifer Tosch of Black Heritage Amsterdam Tours recites ‘If We Must Die‘ by poet Claude McKay, during Ferguson demonstration in Amsterdam. Around 80 to 100 Dutch citizens came together to hold a silent march through the streets of Amsterdam and towards the U.S. Consulate.

Visit her site to learn more about Amsterdam’s hidden Dutch African Diaspora history.

Among the slogans of the demonstration were ‘Stop Police Brutality’, ‘Enough is enough’, ‘No Justice No Peace’, ‘‘Michael Brown rest in power’, and ‘Hands up don’t shoot’.

Rapper Mistrezz Drenthe had initiated the demonstration.

Like there also had been a demonstration in London, England.