Wild boar piglets


This is a video about wild boar piglets, filmed in wildlife park Het Aardhuis in the Veluwe region in Netherlands on 27 March 2013.

Spring weather was cold then. So, the piglets huddled together to keep warm.

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British army animal abuse in Denmark


This video is called Pigs Strung Up And SHOT To Train British Army Medics In Treating Gunshot Wounds.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain, with photos there:

EXCLUSIVE: Pigs strung up and SHOT to train British Army medics in treating gunshot wounds

Feb 18, 2014 00:00

By Chris Hughes, Andy Lines

Military surgeons are being sent to Denmark for the controversial training on live animals – even though the practice is illegal in the UK

Pigs are being shot so British Army medics can learn to treat battle wounds.

Military surgeons are sent to Denmark for the controversial training on live animals – even though the practice is illegal in the UK.

Animal rights group PETA has slammed the “cruel” practice.

A live pig dangles from a wooden frame as a soldier shoots it to inflict horrific injuries.

Military medics then operate on the animal’s traumatic gunshot wounds while it is still breathing.

The shocking photos taken in Denmark have put the country at the centre of another animal cruelty row after the controversial killing of a giraffe at Copenhagen Zoo.

Campaigners who are disgusted by the pig shootings are demanding an end to the brutal military training courses that are nicknamed Operation Danish Bacon.

This kind of training is banned in Britain – yet our Army medics are sent to Denmark to take part.

Mimi Bekhechi, associate director of animal rights group PETA UK, said: “The overwhelming majority of the UK’s Nato allies do not shoot, stab or dismember animals for their military training exercises.

“The Ministry of Defence’s decision to ship out members of the armed forces for these deadly and cruel exercises in Denmark – which would be illegal if conducted in the UK – is impossible to justify medically, ethically or educationally.”

The pigs are strung up then blasted with an AK-47 rifle or a 9mm handgun.

To give them experience of working on gun wounds, medics then operate on the animals. Even if the surgery is a success, the pigs are later killed.

The British Army sends surgeons to Jaegerspris Kaserne in Denmark twice a year to take part in the exercises.

During the training the pigs are “subjected to bullet and blast wounds”, the UK Government has confirmed. PETA has appealed to the Danish Minister of Defence to stop the country’s animal-based trauma training exercises.

Campaigners argue that hi-tech human simulators should be used instead, adding that they are more realistic than using live animals.

A PETA spokesman said: “Eighty per cent of Nato allies have already ended the cruel use of animals in archaic military medical training exercises. …

PETA has also filed a complaint with the European Commission against Denmark over the training courses.

An EU directive, as well as Denmark’s Animal Welfare Act, require that non-animal methods should be used to train the military whenever available.

A former US military medical worker – who is now with PETA – insisted that compared to operating on animals that have been stabbed or shot, the
lifelike human simulators are a far superior way of preparing doctors to treat injured humans.

Experts said the Caesar patient simulator, which “breathes” and “bleeds”, can be used anywhere.

It has been developed to give medics the best possible grounding in how to deal with casualties on the front line and in disaster zones.

The MoD has strongly defended sending its medical staff for the live animal training. …

These never-before-seen photographs of pigs being shot follow Denmark coming under heavy fire over its treatment of giraffes.

This month the zoo in Copenhagen killed a giraffe called Marius to avoid interbreeding – then his body was dissected and fed to the lions as young children watched.

Staff received death threats after the animal’s death.

Another zoo in Denmark then considered killing a giraffe, also called Marius, to avoid fights among males after the planned arrival of a female.

Marius won a reprieve because moves to introduce the female were shelved.

Genetic similarities between people and pigs

Pigs are genetically very close to humans.

The flesh of swine is so similar to our own that if you eat under-cooked pork you can get parasites that live equally as well in our own flesh.

In 2000 a heart doctor gave a patient a transfusion of pig’s blood following a number of attempts at animal-to-human organ transplants.

London surgeon Dr Dhaniram Baruah injected more than half a pint of the blood into a man suffering from severe anemia.

The term ‘long pork’ was reportedly coined by cannibals because human meat tastes like pork.

During an interview from his prison cell Germany’s infamous cannibal Armin Meiwes – who ate an estimated 20kg of his victim – said: “The flesh tastes like pork.

“It tastes a little bit more bitter, stronger. It tastes quite good.”

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Peccaries help to discover Brazilian prehistoric art


This video says about itself:

White-lipped Peccary in the Clay Lick of the Yasuni

1 Apr 2011

The White-lipped Peccary, Tayassu pecari, is a peccary species found in Central and South America, living in rainforest, dry forest and chaco scrub. It is monotypic within the genus Tayassu.

The white-lipped peccary is diurnal and lives in large herds of 50 to 300+ individuals, though there have been reported sightings of up to 2,000 individuals. It is an omnivorous animal, feeding on fruits, roots, tubers, palm nuts, grasses and invertebrates.

Like the collared peccary, it is a main prey species of the jaguar and, less frequently, of the cougar.

The white-lipped peccary is widely considered the most dangerous peccary; unlike the rather shy collared peccary, the white-lipped species will charge at any enemy if cornered, and when one of them is injured, the entire herd returns to defend it. There are reports of jaguars being killed by angered peccary herds and even some humans have been killed.

Distribution

The white-lipped peccary is found in Central America and South America. It ranges from southeast Mexico, throughout eastern Central America, to northern Argentina. The white-lipped peccary was introduced to Cuba in 1930, but possibly is no longer found there. According to the IUCN it’s already extirpated in El Salvador and its range has been reduced in Mexico and Central America during the last 20 years

From Wildlife Extra:

White-lipped peccary trails lead to archaeological discovery in Brazil

WCS researchers stumble upon 4,000-10,000 year-old cave drawings

November 2013: Ancient cave drawings of animals made by hunter-gatherer societies thousands of years ago were a surprise find in Brazil for a team of scientists on the trail of white-lipped peccaries, herd-forming pig-like animals that travel long distances. The team from the Wildlife Conservation Society and a local partner NGO, Instituto Quinta do Sol were gathering environmental data in forests that link Brazil’s Pantanal and Cerrado biomes.

The peccaries are vulnerable to human activities, such as deforestation and hunting, and are disappearing from large swaths of their former range from southern Mexico to northern Argentina. While following signals from radio-collared white-lipped peccaries and the foraging trails of peccary herds, the team encountered a series of prominent sandstone formations with caves containing drawings of animals and geometric figures.

Keuroghlian contacted Aguiar, a regional specialist in cave drawings. [Aguiar] determined that the drawings were made between 4,000–10,000 years ago by hunter-gatherer societies that either occupied the caves, or used them specifically for their artistic activities. The style of some drawings, Aguiar noted, was consistent with what archeologists call the Planalto (central Brazilian plateau) tradition, while others, surprisingly, were more similar to Nordeste (northeastern Brazil) or Agreste (forest to arid-land transition in NE Brazil) style drawings. The drawings depict an assemblage of animals including armadillos, deer, large cats, birds, and reptiles, as well as human-like figures and geometric symbols. Oddly, the subject of the WCS surveys in the area—peccaries—are absent from the illustrations. Aguiar hopes to conduct cave floor excavations and geological dating at the sites in order to fully interpret the drawings.

“These discoveries of cave drawings emphasize the importance of protecting the Cerrado and Pantanal ecosystems, both for their cultural and natural heritage” said Dr. Julie Kunen, Director of WCS’s Latin America and Caribbean Program and an expert on Mayan archeology. “We hope to partner with local landowners to protect these cave sites, as well as the forests that surround them, so that the cultural heritage and wildlife depicted in the drawings are preserved for future generations.”

The drawings are the subject of a recently published study by archeologists Rodrigo Luis Simas de Aguiar and Keny Marques Lima in the journal Revista Clio Arqueológica (see link). The diversity of the renderings, according to the authors, adds significantly to our knowledge of rock art from the Cerrado plateau region that borders the Pantanal.

Oak trees hinder Dutch boar hunters


This video from England is called Wild boar with piglets, Forest of Dean – 22nd April 2012.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Acorns frustrate boar hunting

Monday 14 Oct 2013, 12:05 (Update: 14-10-13, 12:48)

Hunters expect that it will be very hard this year to shoot wild boars in the Veluwe region. This is because there are many acorns, chestnuts and beechnuts this year.

Until the end of the hunting season over 1,300 pigs are supposed to be killed in the Veluwe. Normally the hunters gather near feeding areas. Hungry boars will come to feed, and then they will be shot.

But now that the whole forest is littered with acorns, chestnuts and beechnuts, the pigs have no need to come to the feeding areas. They roam the forests everywhere, there is plenty to eat and the hunters will have to chase the animals.

Wildlife organization Het Edelhert thinks that the hunters now will shoot only 70 percent of the required number of animals.

Wild boar piglets, video


On 24 August 2013, Johan Nijenhuis from the Netherlands made this video, of wild boar adults with piglets.

British war department’s cruel animal experiments


This video from Britain says about itself:

May 17, 2012

During 2004, two UK television documentaries were produced which investigated the past activities of the UK Government’s Biological Warfare facility at Porton Down, Wiltshire.

The programmes revealed that scientists from Porton Down had used the UK as a vast outdoor laboratory during the Cold War. From 1950 to 1975, Porton scientists had clandestinely sprayed massive amounts of live bacteria (Serratia marcescens, E. coli MRE162 and Bacillus subtilis) and several tons of chemical compounds (such as Zinc Cadmium sulphide) over large parts of the UK.

The first programme shows – how Royal Enfield workers in an underground factory at Westwood Quarry were repeatedly exposed to an opportunistic pathogen in the early 1950s; how members of the public travelling on a regular railway train on the Salisbury-Exeter line were sprayed with live bacteria by Porton scientists while travelling through a tunnel; how the city of Salisbury was ‘attacked’ during August of 1960 with large amounts of a cadmium compound: and how Porton sceintists conducted the large, and now infamous, series of experiments – known as the Lyme Bay Trials.

The latter experiments exposed millions of UK residents to massive aerosols of live bacteria (E.coli and Bacillus subtilis) during the years 1963-1975. The huge bacterial clouds were sprayed from an Admiralty ship – ETV ICEWHALE – and were carried onshore by the wind and sampled by Porton scientists up to 50 miles inland. Athough this research was meant to be of a defensive nature, the official Porton film of these experiments stated: “Whilst these trials were designed for specific research purposes, they demonstrated, in a striking way, the feasibility of small-scale biological warfare. An appreciable dose of viable bacteria was achieved over an area greater than 1,000 square miles, by the release of only 120 gallons of suspension”.

From the (Conservative) Daily Telegraph in Britain, about the British Department of War … oops-a-daisy … ‘defence’:

Rise in animal experiments at defence laboratory

Almost 10,000 experiments were conducted on animals, including monkeys and pigs, at the Porton Down military research base last year, it has been revealed.

By Telegraph reporters

3:35PM GMT 18 Dec 2012

The number of animal tests carried out at the top-secret facility in Wiltshire increased by 300 since 2010 and by more than 1,000 since 2009.

Currently 21 licensed animal procedures are under way at Porton Down Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL).

Most of these fall into the “substantial” severity category which may cause “significant or prolonged animal suffering”.

Six of the projects cover work funded directly by US defence agencies.

The details were disclosed in a series of written answers from junior defence minister Philip Dunne.

He was responding to parliamentary questions tabled by Liberal Democrat MP Mike Hancock, the member for Portsmouth South.

Mr Hancock said he was shocked by the statistics which, until now, were never made generally public.

Last month the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection highlighted “disturbing and cruel” experiments at Porton Down, said to include live pigs being blasted with explosives and forced to inhale mustard gas, monkeys being infected with anthrax and guinea pigs being killed with nerve agent.

Mr Dunne, the minister responsible for defence science and technology, listed the number of animal procedures undertaken at DSTL Porton Down over the last three years.

The figure has risen from 8,452 in 2009 to 9,582 in 2010 and 9,882 last year, he revealed.

The animals involved were pigs, rabbits, monkeys and rodents.

All scientific experiments on animals, including those at Porton Down, have to be licensed by the Home Office under the proviso that suffering is minimised as much as possible.

Procedures are graded according to the severity of harm or suffering they inflict.

Of the 21 “active” projects at Porton Down, four are “unclassified”, three are “mild”, six are “moderate” and eight are categorised as “substantial”, said Mr Dunne.

A moderate procedure may cause animals a “noticeable degree of pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm”, according to the Home Office definition. Substantial severity “may cause a major departure from the animal’s usual state of health or well-being with significant or prolonged animal suffering”.

Mr Hancock said: “I was shocked to learn that almost 10,000 animal experiments are taking place at Porton Down every year, including ones inflicting substantial levels of suffering.

“The details were not included in the annual statistics published by the Home Office and many people will be totally unaware that this suffering is occurring.

“It is important that the Ministry of Defence routinely gives more information on its use of animals so the public can be fully informed.”

BUAV chief executive Michelle Thew said: “It is alarming that almost 10,000 animal experiments for military purposes took place in 2011 and that many animals were subjected to the most extreme suffering categorised by the Government.

“Some of the animal research conducted at Porton Down was even funded by the US defence agencies.

“The BUAV is calling for an end to the use of animals, including monkeys and pigs in these gruesome experiments. We need to ensure the safety of soldiers and civilians but the answer does not lay in blowing up or exposing animals to lethal chemical warfare and nerve agents.”

A REPORT published by the Ministry of Defence admitted that some trials of chemical agents on human volunteers at Porton Down from the 1940s to the 1970s involved “serious departures” from ethical standards: here.

NATO accused of anti-animal cruelty


This video is called Cute mangalitza piglets.

By Tony Patey in Britain:

Charities slam MoD’s surgery on shot pigs

Monday 19 November 2012

Animal welfare groups attacked the Ministry of Defence today after it defended shooting live pigs to train army surgeons.

The pigs are shot by marksmen at a Nato training facility in Jaegerspris, Denmark, to replicate battlefield wounds and are then operated on by military medical staff.

Formerly known as Operation Danish Bacon, the practice has been described by animal rights groups as “impossible to justify medically, ethically and educationally.”

An MoD spokeswoman said: “This training provides invaluable experience, exposing our surgical teams to the specific challenges posed by the injuries of modern armed conflict.”

The MoD said although the practice would not be illegal in Britain, approval would have to be obtained on a case-by-case basis from the Home Office.

The government of the day suspended British participation in the surgical training exercises in summer 1998 after they were brought to the attention of ministers.

But the courses were re-instated after it was determined there was “no equally effective alternative” and that it was “entirely appropriate and, indeed, necessary” for military surgeons to carry out training on animals.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals described the procedure as “invasive and deadly” and claimed it would be illegal in this country.

It called for life-like dolls that “breathe” and “bleed” to replace the use of live animals.

Associate director for Peta UK Mimi Bekhechi said: “The overwhelming majority of the UK’s Nato allies do not shoot, stab and dismember animals for their military training exercises.”

The RSPCA said it was “upsetting that pigs were shot for surgeon practice.

“Pigs are highly intelligent animals and many people will be very distressed to hear about this,” it said.

“It is yet another example where animals pay the price of man’s inhumanity to man.

“We implore the military to explore the viability of alternative methods, and where these are found lacking, to invest in their further development.”

From The Independent:

Eighteen pigs were used in the most recent tests earlier this month, the Mail on Sunday reported.

They had circles drawn on their underbellies before a three-man sniper team fired shots intended to damage organs but not kill, the paper said.

Surgeons then treated them as they would battle zone casualties, reportedly keeping the pigs alive for two hours before they were put down.

‘We’re going to damage a lot of pigs’ livers’: Horrific boast of battlefield doctors who shoot then operate on injured animals at Nato base: here.

Mangalitza pigs against Dutch pest plants


This video is called Cute mangalitza piglets.

Mangalitza pigs are a woolly domestic race from eastern Europe.

As their wool protects them, they are one of few animal species willing to eat stinging giant hogweed.

Giant hogweed, originally from Asia, was introduced as a garden plant elsewhere. It became a pest, including in Almere city in the Netherlands.

Now, Almere local authorities have brought in mangalitza pigs to eat the hogweed.

A video about that is here.

See also here.