Long-eared owls resting, video


This is a video about a group of sixteen long-eared owls, resting in a woodland in the Netherlands. Every now then, they see the mouse under the trees, or hear a great spotted woodpecker sound.

Chris Grootzwager made this video.

Illegal dead animal collection discovery


This video is called PBS Nature 2012: Magic of the Snowy Owl.

Translated from ANP news agency in the Netherlands:

November 20, 2014 11:11

Police have found a home in Hoogeveen dozens of stuffed and frozen animals. Some of them were protected species. Snowy owls, an eagle owl and an African owl were found in the house. Police also found about seventy frozen animals including stone martens, badgers, polecats, stoats and goshawks. Fifty animals were seized.

Illegal

The police found the illegal collection when they were looking for a marijuana plantation in the home. During the search it turned out that the man did not grow marijuana. The police think the man did not acquire the animals legally. Possession, buying or selling of stuffed protected species or of animals stuffed in an illegal way is punishable.

Little owl and Thekla lark in Spain


Little owl, 3 November 2014

This little owl was photographed in Spain, on a hillock in a plain, south of the Pyrenees.

After 2 November, 3 November 2014 in Aragon.

To Monegros plain.

A green sandpiper on a lakelet bank.

Foggy weather. There has been drought for a long time. As we walk, many millipedes on the dry soil.

Also, many young natterjack toads. Still very small, less than one centimeter.

Many larks flying and singing. Most of them are calandra larks. Also some, smaller, lesser short-toed larks.

We had hoped to see sandgrouse here, but we don’t see them.

We do see the little owl, pictured at the top of this blog post.

A meadow pipit drinking at one of few puddles.

Then, sandgrouse at last: three black-bellied sandgrouse.

This video is about black-bellied sandgrouse (and chukar partridges)  in Israel. We could not see these three ones in Spain as well, as they flew overhead fast.

A crested lark on a field.

A bit further, eight red-legged partridges.

A male merlin on a wall. A hoopoe on a rock.

Six black-bellied sandgrouse on a field.

A flock of choughs.

Thekla lark, 3 November 2014

A bit further back along the same road, a Thekla lark. Sometimes, it sings.

Thekla lark, Aragon, 3 November 2014

We go back to the lakelet. A snipe.

Butterfly, Spain, 3 November 2014

Though it is already November, still butterflies. Like this one.

We climb a hillock. At first, we see hardly any birds. A bit later, we can see scores of pin-tailed sandgrouse.

After a long time of exerting our eyes and binoculars near a village, we finally manage to see a well-camouflaged stone curlew on a field near a village. The scores of cattle egrets on a building there are easier to spot.

Little grebe, Spain, 3 November 2014

Finally, a hide near a lake. A little grebe.

Teal male, 3 November 2014

A teal.

Water pipit, 3 November 2014

A water pipit.

Marsh harriers, 3 November 2014

Two marsh harriers, flying to the reedbeds for sleeping.

Short-eared owl, purple sandpipers, black redstart


Feral pigeons, Scheveningen, 18 october 2014

On 18 October 2014, on the southern jetty of Scheveningen harbour, there were more birds than just ruddy turnstones. Like these two feral pigeons at the end of the jetty.

They had been ‘kissing’; unfortunately just before the photo.

We walked back.

Northern wheatear, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

This migrating northern wheatear standing on a rock.

Short-eared owl, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

Then, an even more special migratory bird: a short-eared owl passed the jetty!

Short-eared owl, North Sea, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

Unusual, to see this uncommon bird, a land bird, flying south over the North Sea waves. Two herring gulls harassed it.

Short-eared owls do fly over the sea sometimes: here.

Purple sandpiper, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

Also, purple sandpipers on the jetty rocks. Some awake.

Purple sandpiper sleeping, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

And some sleepy.

Black redstart, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

We were back on the continent. Not far from the beginning of the jetty, this black redstart on concrete near a sand dune.

We went to the ‘Vulkaan‘ (the Volcano), a high sand dune south of The Hague. It is a good vantage point for seeing bird migration. The many birdwatchers present saw, eg, song thrushes and mistle thrushes fly past.

Texas barn owls, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Texas Barn Owls Highlights 2014

7 October 2014

Over six months viewers followed a family of Barn Owls in Italy, Texas. Five eggs were laid and hatched in May. Unfortunately the two youngest owlets passed away, most likely due to starvation, however the strongly bonded Barn Owl parents raised 3 healthy owlets. All three juveniles left the nest box July 14, but continued to return to roost in the box during the day until the end of August. The parents throughout September and October are roosting in the box over night and continue to bond.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology would like to thank the many people involved in watching, tweeting to @texasbarnowls and helping to protect these enchanting birds. Without the devotion of a community of dedicated people we would not be able to show these birds to the world.

A special thank you to everyone who donated to keep the cams running, your support means everything to us.

Thanks for watching, see you in 2015.

For more highlights and news check out here.

Owl news update


This is a video from California in the USA about baby western screech owls in a wildlife hospital.

From the Cornell Lab or Ornithology in the USA:

New owl resources!

Have you ever heard something go screech in the night, and wondered what it was? There’s a good chance it was an owl! Not all owls hoot; some shriek, bark, and wail!

For a limited time, you can download free owl sounds from the Cornell Lab’s Macaulay Library. They’re owl yours to do with what you like…use them as your phone’s ringtone, or add them to your Halloween party playlist! Just get them before they disappear into the night.

Can’t get enough owls? Find out which owls in your area you can attract with a nesting box or platform. Enter your region and habitat into our Right Bird, Right House tool, and get free nest box plans and placement tips.

And if you’re wondering why so many Halloween decorations feature owls, consider this: owls are symbols of death in many cultures. Read our Citizen Science Blog post, Myths of the Ghost Bird, to find out how these helpful birds crept into Halloween folklore.

Old owl and falcon pellets, new research


This video is called Dissecting Owl Pellets – Mr. Wizard’s Challenge.

The Dutch Mammal Society reports today about a discovery in Naturalis museum in Leiden.

There, old boxes were found. It turned out that these boxes contained many pellets, leftovers of meals of owls, raptors and other predators. Most were decades old.

Translated from the report:

The pellets were from ten types of predators. Most items were from barn owls (24 items). The long-eared owl was second (11 items). Then were six kestrel items. Pellets from other predators were only sparsely represented. 23 small mammals were identified in the pellets. The most special finds were water shrew, bicoloured white-toothed shrew, root vole, European pine vole and occasional finds of hedgehog, black rat and garden dormouse. In addition, a small number of birds and a small number of insects were found.

The complete report is here.