New Zealand Seabird of the Year vote


This video says about itself:

Seabird Diversity in the Southern Ocean

The New Zealand archipelago, particularly its subantarctic islands, is a global seabird hotspot. It’s home to 25 per cent of the world’s breeding seabird populations and a very diverse array of penguin, albatross, petrel and shearwater species.

NIWA seabird ecologist Paul Sagar outlines the major threats to seabirds on land and at sea. He explains how modern tracking technology is being used to study interactions between foraging seabirds and fishing vessels during the breeding season, and to track their enormous migrations between breeding seasons. These well-travelled seabirds serve as indicators of what’s happening in ocean ecosystems across the world.

From the New Zealand 2014 Seabird of the Year site:

Here’s where you can vote for your favourite seabird, and if you like, make a contribution to Forest & Bird’s work to protect New Zealand’s seabirds. Forest & Bird is New Zealand’s leading independent conservation organisation. To see what we are doing for seabirds click here.

New Zealand is a seabird superpower. More than a third of the world’s seabird species spend at least part of their lives here. Thirty-six of those only breed here. The Seabird of the Year poll is supported by Heritage Expeditions. Voting closes at midday on Monday the 24th of November.

New worm species discovery in the Netherlands


Cirriformia tentaculata in New Zealand

Translated from the Dutch marine biologists of Stichting ANEMOON:

Sunday, October 26, 2014

A new marine worm species, new for the Netherlands, has recently been discovered. Recreational divers found Cirriformia tentaculata in the central Oosterschelde estuary, and published their findings in ‘Het Zeepaardje’, the bimonthly magazine of the Strandwerkgemeenschap. It is not known whether the species has only just appeared on the Dutch coast, or that it had already been present for a long time but had never been discovered before because of its unobtrusive way of life.

Much sea life is hardly visible to the eyes of sport divers. At least 300 species of worms are known from our coastal waters. Many species live hidden in the sand and mud bottoms.

So, probably many worm species in the Netherlands have not been discovered yet.

The origin of annelids: here.

New Zealand kiwis released into the wild


This video from New Zealand is called Newly Hatched Western North Island Brown Kiwi.

From the Waikato Times in New Zealand:

Releasing kiwis into the wild

RACHEL THOMAS

We’re five minutes late through the door so collect dirty looks from tourists in bedazzled hats and souvenir T-shirts.

Myself and lens man Mike Scott are here for the 61st liberation of kiwi on Sanctuary Mountain in Pukeatua, and these kiwi seekers are impatient to begin the wild mission.

Parawera, a seven-month-old North Island Western brown kiwi who was rescued from Waimarino Forest, will be tracked, weighed, measured and examined to ensure she’s ready to move into the main enclosure where she can roam, breed and forage in a 3500-hectare certified predator-free haven.

Leading the way is kiwi tracking dog Bella, who is certified by the Department of Conservation to sniff out new chicks.

This is the coolest thing Max Cook, 6, has done all school holidays, and he’s on high alert. “Is that a kiwi?” he whispers in the direction of a robin.

Max, of Hukanui School, has seen kiwi once before in a “big glass jar” in a zoo in a place he can’t remember.

Biodiversity ranger Mark Lammas leads our gang of 15 into the southern enclosure. This is the kiwi creche, where the trust raises western brown birds before releasing them on to the main mountain.

“To begin with our aim was to get between 30 and 40 unrelated [kiwi] birds on to the main mountain and that was our founder population – from there those birds can be self-sustainable.”

Bella leads our trail, helped by blue antennae that pick up transmitters strapped onto each kiwi’s ankle. Each one emits a different signal, and we listen for the blip-blip of Parawera. It’s a game of hot and cold.

Bella pokes her nose into a burrow where Parawera was moments earlier.

The antennae give us joy next to a valley of fern and punga. Weaving through tangled webs of vines and tripping sticks, our troop descends into the bush. Lammas, Bella and kiwi handler Nola Griggs-Tamaki split from us to find the kiwi. We wait. Max makes a fan from a leaf and a stick. Kiwi ingenuity.

Finally with a rustle and a hush, Lammas emerges from behind the vines with a shape tucked into his jumper.

Bella sniffed her out from in the base of a hollowed tree.

Lammas wants me to hold her while he does the health check. Quick tutorial – finger between the ankles, firm grip on her legs, hand under her bum, “please don’t crush her”, and our national icon is trembling in my arms.

Her feathers feel like toe toe and her tiny heart is racing. This is her midnight and we’re a foreign dream.

At 1.2kg, the birds are considered large enough to fend off an attack from a stoat.

Parawera is strong and healthy at 1.35kg. Lammas says her “back steaks” are in great shape. It’s what they like to see, plenty of meat.

“I thought she was going to be smaller,” Max confesses, “but I felt her feet and they were a little squishy.”

Sanctuary Mountain has capacity for 300 pairs of kiwi, Lammas says. That should be reached in the next 10 or 20 years, then the trust will begin exporting kiwi from the mountain “and inject them into places where kiwi have become locally extinct”.

Our troop ceremoniously gathers around the base of a hollow tree, where a dark window invites Parawera to her new world.

Lammas can’t articulate what he feels in this moment. “There’s a part of liberating our national icon, words can’t express it. There’s a great sense of pride . . . to turn around the decline of kiwi.”

Bella stands guard, a watchdog in every sense of the word. Lammas releases her into the chasm then drags some weighty green ferns over the top.

Goodnight, kiwi.

Whale exhibition in Denver, USA


This video from the American Museum of Natural History in New York City says about itself:

11 February 2013

Whales: Giants of the Deep” brings visitors closer than ever to some of the mightiest, most massive, and mysterious mammals on Earth. Featuring life-size models, interactive exhibits, and films—as well as more than 20 stunning whale skulls and skeletons—the family-friendly exhibition also reveals the history of the close relationship between humans and whales, from the traditions of Maori whale riders to the whaling industry and later rise of laws protecting whales from commercial hunters.

Originally developed at Te Papa Tongarewa, the national museum of New Zealand, the exhibition will also feature rarely viewed specimens from the Museum’s own world-class collections.

From CBS in the USA:

Whales: Giants Of The Deep Opens At DMNS In October

September 26, 2014 8:28 PM

DENVER (CBS4) – The skeleton of a 58-foot sperm whale is one of 20 whale specimens that will be shown as part of a new exhibition at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science that opens next month.

The exhibit, called Whales: Giants of the Deep, is on tour from the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, which boasts one of the largest collections of marine mammals in the world.

The exhibit will also feature life-sized models, digital interactives and rare artifacts. DMNS said visitors can crawl through a life-sized replica of a blue whale’s heart, touch whale teeth and hear the sounds whales use to navigate, communicate and find food.

The exhibit opens Oct. 10 and is free with museum admission.

Antarctic colossal squid examined in New Zealand


This video from New Zealand says about itself:

Scientists latch on to colossal squid

Huge specimen caught in Antarctic waters by New Zealand fishing crew is one of few ever examined

16 September 2014

The live stream begins at 06:57: here.

Te Papa has a new colossal squid!

Watch live online as specialists in squid biology from Te Papa and Auckland University of Technology undertake research on this rare find. This colossal squid and the specimen already on display at Te Papa are the only two of their kind caught intact – ever! Large colossal squid specimens in good condition are rarely available to scientists, so this latest example has caused great excitement.

Ask our squid scientists:

Email sciencelive@tepapa.govt.nz with your questions for our squid scientists, or add them in the comments area below. We’ll answer them during the live show.

For regular updates and the latest on the colossal squid, follow:

Colossal squid blogs: www.blog.tepapa.govt.nz/category/colossa­l-squid

See also here.

New Zealand’s Prime Minister’s spying scandal


This 13 September video is called [Glenn] Greenwald: GCSB Statement “We Do Not Engage in Mass Surveillance of New Zealanders” is Not Truthful.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

New Zealand PM deceiving public over spying claims, says Glenn Greenwald

Journalist says he will produce documents by Edward Snowden that prove John Key approved mass surveillance of citizens

Toby Manhire in Auckland

Sunday 14 September 2014 13.15 BST

An already tumultuous New Zealand election campaign took another dramatic turn less than a week before polling day when the prime minister, John Key, responded angrily to claims by the American journalist Glenn Greenwald that he had been “deceiving the public” over assurances on spying.

Greenwald, who is visiting New Zealand at the invitation of the German internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, says he will produce documents provided by the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden that prove the New Zealand government approved mass surveillance of its residents by the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB), New Zealand’s equivalent of the NSA.

Dotcom, who is sought for extradition from New Zealand by the US on copyright charges relating to his now defunct Megaupload file-storage site, is hosting an event in Auckland on Monday called The Moment of Truth, which doubles as a rally for the Dotcom-founded Internet party.

Greenwald has promised to produce his evidence at the event, while Dotcom is pledging to show further links between Key and Hollywood relating to his own case. Adding to the spectacle, Julian Assange is expected to beam in via video link from the Ecuadorian embassy in London, while Dotcom has hinted that Snowden may also appear on the big screen from Moscow.

In media interviews, Key has repeatedly dismissed Greenwald as “Dotcom’s little henchman”.

Greenwald responded by saying: “I absolutely stand by everything I’ve said.” He told 3 News: “They did far more than look at the idea; they adopted the idea and took steps to make it a reality.”

He added: “I’ve done reporting of surveillance all over the world and a lot of governments haven’t liked what I’ve said, but I’ve never seen a head of government lose their dignity and get down in the mud and start chucking names to discredit the journalist in order to discredit the journalism.”

Greenwald, a former Guardian journalist, has authored hundreds of stories based on leaks from Edward Snowden exposing the breadth of surveillance undertaken by the NSA and its partners in the Five-Eyes alliance, which includes New Zealand. The work was recognised with a Pulitzer prize in April 2014.

Even before the spying controversy, the Key campaign was bedevilled by scandal, with a senior cabinet minister forced to resign following the publication of a book based on hacked emails that revealed links between the ruling centre-right National party and an attack-blogger.

Ahead of election, Snowden reveals mass spying on New Zealanders: here.

Britons with depression not getting treatment


This video from New Zealand says about itself:

Can we use video games to treat depression?

17 April 2011

Ever wonder if gaming can be used as a therapy for young people with depression?

Find out how University of Auckland researcher, Dr Sally Merry, and her team of researchers and games developers have created a video game to treat youth depression. Sally hopes the therapy will reach out to depressed youth, 75% of whom would normally receive no treatment.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Two-thirds of Britons with depression get no treatment

If these figures related to cancer patients the nation would be in uproar, says new president of Royal College of Psychiatrists

Sarah Boseley, health editor

Wednesday 13 August 2014 13.12 BST

Less than a third of people with common mental health problems get any treatment at all – a situation the nation would not tolerate if they had cancer, according to the incoming president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

While the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, has pledged to deliver “parity of esteem” for mental and physical health services, the treatment gap is now so huge that it may prove impossible to bridge in the current financial climate, said Professor Simon Wessely of King’s College London in his first interview since election to the post.

“People are still routinely waiting for – well, we don’t really know, but certainly more than 18 weeks, possibly up to two years, for their treatment and that is routine in some parts of the country. Some children aren’t getting any treatment at all – literally none. That’s what’s happening. So although we have the aspiration, the gap is now so big and yet there is no more money,” he said.

Wessely said there would be a public outcry if those who went without treatment were cancer patients rather than people with mental health problems. Imagine, he told the Guardian, the reaction if he gave a talk that began: “‘So, we have a problem in cancer service at the moment. Only 30% of people with cancer are getting treatment, so 70% of them don’t get any treatment for their cancer at all and it’s not even recognised.”

If he were truly talking about cancer, he said, “you’d be absolutely appalled and you would be screaming from the rooftops.” Wessely said he had asked Simon Stevens, the NHS England chief executive, how the gap would be bridged but was told that resolving the issue would involve a “much longer conversation with the public”.

A larger proportion of people with psychosis, who have severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, are on treatment, but even that figure is still only 65%, according to Wessely, who added: “That doesn’t mean they are getting the right treatment or anything like that, but getting something. For most mental disorders it is still the exception not the rule to be recognised, detected and treated. So when we talk about the rise in antidepressant prescribing, before we start leaping to the tumbrils and saying the world’s coming to an end we should have a look and say, hang on a second, if that is appropriate prescribing then that’s good.”

The concern over pills for common mental disorders – for depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), for instance – could be misplaced, Wessely argued. Much of the criticism assumes that GPs are putting many more people on pills because of an absence of counselling or talking therapies, even though the numbers of therapists being trained to provide cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has substantially risen thanks to a government programme called IAPT (improving access to psychological therapies).

Wessely applauded IAPT, but did not accept the argument that talking therapies were necessarily “better”, a word that to many people has a moral implication. “If you say they are more effective, I don’t really think that’s true. I think they are cheaper and easier. CBT is more popular with some people, but other people don’t like it,” he said. “The truth is most people don’t get either. Of course if you are working in areas of high antidepressant prescribing – they tend to be difficult areas like Merthyr Tydfil or Blackpool – of course where you don’t have good psychological services then you will use antidepressants. That’s not wrong, but what’s wrong is you don’t have the alternatives.”

In the US, the rate of use of stimulant drugs such as Ritalin exceeds the number of people with ADHD, so there is over-medication of the disorder. “But in Britain it is under, which suggests under-prescribing.”

The UK is also seriously short of psychiatric beds. “The fact that people are travelling hundreds of miles for a bed, the fact that bed occupancy is now 100% everywhere – in some trusts it is 110% and we’re hot-bedding – is a symptom of a system [in crisis]. Relatives and patients hate it. Junior doctors hate it – they spend all their time on the phone. Sometimes bad decisions are made just to get a bed. But we don’t think the answer is just let us have some more beds because those will probably fill up as well. We’ve been told for years that if we just get community care right we won’t need beds. That’s clearly not true. We will be announcing a commission on beds but it’s really on systems. Beds are symptomatic of a problem.”

Wessely, who is married to Clare Gerada, recent head of the Royal College of GPs, strongly believes in the need for general doctors, nurses, midwives and social workers to have more mental health training and for there to be much greater integration of diagnosis and treatment of physical and mental disorders. Trials have shown that picking up and treating depression in people with type 2 diabetes improves the control they have over the disease: they take their medication and keep complications at bay. And there are patients who are referred by their GP to a specialist because of a suspected heart complaint – which turns out to be panic attacks that have not been picked up for months.

“The whole of our healthcare system is about separating mental and physical. You couldn’t devise a system better suited to separating the mental and the physical if you tried,” he said. At King’s, psychiatrists have been put into general medical clinics with great results. “Most people have quite complicated views of their illness anyway,” he said. They are not resistant to doctors offering cardiac tests and counselling for a recent divorce at the same time.

“Certainly when you look at the cost of investigations, when you look at the cost of treatment that isn’t necessary, when you look at the cost of lost working days, when you look at the cost of additional care, actually it does become cost effective. The problem we always have is those savings are not always made to the health service.

“But we know people with physical health problems who also have mental health problems cost about 45% more than those who don’t. That’s absolutely and unequivocally clear. The cost of their care goes up. They comply less with treatment, they come back more often, they have lower satisfaction and they have more complications.”

• To contact Samaritans, call 08457 90 90 90