United States woman jailed for photographing pro-peace protest


This 11 July 2014 video from the USA is called Grandmother Sentenced to 1 Year in Prison After Protest at U.S. Drone Base.

From Alternet in the USA:

By Alyssa Figueroa

Woman Sentenced to Prison for Photographing a War Protest

‘We are losing a generation because of drones’ says activist Mary Anne Grady Flores.

July 26, 2014

Warplanes have long been based at Hancock Field Air National Guard Base in Syracuse, NY. But in 2009, something new arrived: MQ-9 Reaper drones that were flown remotely over Afghanistan, dropping missiles and bombs and unleashing terror.

Organizers in Upstate New York started protests soon after the drones arrived and founded Upstate Drone Action in 2010. In 2011, one longtime activist and member of the Catholic Worker movement, Mary Anne Grady Flores, 57, joined the struggle. As part of the “Hancock 38” in April that year, she was arrested for protesting at the base’s main entrance by participating in a die-in to illustrate the indiscriminate killing of civilians overseas by drones.

She was arrested again in October 2012 for another act of “civil resistance,” as she puts it, not “civil disobedience,” to uphold the U.S. Constitution and international treaties the U.S. signed. That led to Grady Flores and the 16 others being placed under court orders restricting their protest rights. Frustrated by the protesters’ persistence, a base commander, Col. Earl Evans, sought and received an orders of protection — usually reserved for domestic violence victims — which was used over time to bar approximately 50 protesters from the base’s grounds.

In February 2013, Grady Flores stood in the public intersection beyond the driveway leading to the air base taking pictures of the eight protesters participating in an Ash Wednesday action. Those witnessing were asking for forgiveness for what we as American citizens are doing with killer drones. She was later arrested across the street and down the road for “violating the order of protection.” A higher court has found the use of the order invalid.

But on July 10, DeWitt Town Court Judge David Gideon gave Grady Flores the maximum sentence of one year in jail for a second-degree criminal contempt charge, leaving a courtroom of supporters in shock. He defended his harsh sentence by claiming that she “would simply thumb her nose at the law once again.” DeWitt Town judges are planning on holding 20 upcoming trials from August 2014 through 2015, threatening to send each activist to one year in jail.

On Wednesday, July 23, eight protesters went back to the air base to issue their own “people’s order of protection” on behalf of drone victims around the world. Seven were arrested and charged with trespass. Two of the protesters — Grady Flores’ sister Clare and Martha Hennessey, granddaughter of Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic Worker — were charged with violating their orders of protection and are being held on $10,000 bail. All of them refuse to post bail and remain in jail pending their Aug. 6 court dates.

“These judges are out to try to stop the protests on behalf of the base,” Grady Flores said, who is out on $5,000 bail pending her appeal.

Grady Flores spoke to AlterNet about what motivates her to protest against drones, the connections she sees between our foreign and domestic policies, and what gives her hope.

Alyssa Figueroa: You joined these anti-drone protests in 2011. What made you start?

Mary Anne Grady Flores: Drones are a critical issue for people in the countries that are under attack, and it’s important for those of us in the States to make the connections between poverty, racism and colonialism. As many black and Native feminists have pointed out, the violence that has historically and continues to be perpetrated inside the so-called borders of the United States sustains American imperialism abroad.

Mexican wolves born in wild for first time in decades


This video from the USA says about itself:

24 April 2013

An account of the Mexican Wolf, or lobo, at Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, NY.

From Associated Press:

Mexico Reports Litter Of Mexican Gray Wolves Born In Wild For First Time In Decades

07/18/2014 12:59 pm EDT

MEXICO CITY — The first known litter of Mexican gray wolves has been born in the wild as part of a three-year effort to re-introduce the subspecies to a habitat where it disappeared three decades ago, Mexican officials reported Thursday.

Mexico’s National Commission for Natural Protected Areas said the wolf pups were sighted in June by a team of researchers in the western Sierra Madre mountains.

“This first litter represents an important step in the recovery program, because these will be individuals that have never had contact with human beings, as wolves bred in captivity inevitably do,” the commission said in a statement.

It said the pups appeared to be doing well.

Mexico began reintroducing wolves in 2011, and the parents of this litter had been released in December with hopes they would reproduce. Authorities seldom reveal the exact location of breeding pairs in recovery programs, to protect endangered species.

The commission did not respond to requests about how many wolves now live in the wild in Mexico.

The Mexican gray wolf was almost wiped out in the U.S. Southwest by the same factors that eliminated it in Mexico: hunting, trapping and poisoning.

The last five survivors in the U.S. were captured between 1977 and 1980, and then bred in captivity. The first wolves were re-introduced into the wild in the Southwest starting in 1998, mainly in Arizona and New Mexico.

The Mexican gray wolf remains an endangered species in the United States and Mexico.

But a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service annual survey released in January showed there are at least 83 of the endangered predators in Arizona and New Mexico, marking the fourth year in a row the population has increased.

Young red-tailed hawk saved


This video from Cornell in the USA is called Cornell Hawks: E3 Fledges. June 14, 2014.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

E3 Recovering After Post-Fledging Mishap

All three young Red-tailed Hawks fledged from the nest of Big Red and Ezra, with E2 departing on June 6, followed by siblings E1 and E3 on June 14. Watch this clip of E3’s spectacular first flight. [see above]

Unfortunately, just one day after fledging, E3 was injured while resting on a greenhouse roof. An automated greenhouse vent closed, pinning E3. BOGs (birders on the ground) and chat moderators swung into action immediately to notify greenhouse staff. Meanwhile, the vent automatically opened and the staff soon disabled it to prevent it from closing again. Because E3 was unable to fly, Victoria Campbell, a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and Cornell Lab staffer, took E3 to Cornell University’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Health Center. Veterinarians there performed surgery on June 18 to repair E3’s broken wing.

Surgery went well but we will have to wait and see if and how the bone heals and if the flight muscles are fully functional. Meanwhile, E3 is eating and doing well. We’ll continue to post updates to the Bird Cams Facebook page as we learn more. A special thanks to the veterinarians and staff at the Wildlife Health Center for the excellent medical care, and to the cams community for your support.

Young red-tailed hawks fledging on webcam


This video from the USA says about itself:

First Cornell Hawks Fledge of 2014. June 6, 2014.

At 8:05AM EDT, the first nestling, E2, fledged a little earlier than expected!

On a blustery morning the young bird walked out to the ‘fledge ledge’, where we have seen juveniles from previous years fledge. After standing on the ledge for a while the nestling stretches its wings and loses balance. Sweeping under the nest platform the hawk glides towards Weill Hall, coming to a safe stop on a window sill with its back against the window. It then manages to grab hold of the edge of the window sill as it tumbles forward. After hanging from the ledge for a few moments of suspense it manages to flap up safely on to the sill where it stays. The bird appears to be fine, with no injuries as it stretches out its wings and begins preening. It is likely to stay there for a while and will probably be visited and fed by the parents.

Watch the Hawks live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cornellhawks.

See Newly Hatched Osprey Chicks on Live ‘Critter Cam': here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Red-tailed hawks’ nest update from Cornell, USA


This video from Cornell, USA says about itself:

25 April 2013

Ezra stays in nest to protect Big Red and brood from hail and rain in Ithaca.

From the Cornell Lab or Ornithology in the USA, today:

The nestling Red-tailed Hawks high above Cornell’s campus continue to grow on a steady supply of rodents, rabbits, and snakes delivered by Big Red and Ezra. Although the young hawks are still cloaked in down, these feathers will soon give way to their juvenile plumage and they’ll be left alone for longer periods at the nest site. If last year’s fledge interval is any indication of when these young hawks will fledge, we can expect a first flight sometime around June 9. Watch the webcam here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Bowerbird bowers inspire artist


This video is called Life – The Vogelkop Bowerbird: Nature’s Great Seducer – BBC One.

From Audubon Magazine in the USA:

Incredibly Elaborate Homes of Bowerbirds Inspire New Art Exhibit

Janelle Iglesias reimagines the birds’ creations with a mix of locally sourced natural and recycled materials.

Todd Petty

Published: 03/26/2014

The male Vogelkop bowerbird goes to incredible lengths to attract a mate. With the creativity of an artist and the industry of an architect, he collects both natural and manmade materials found nearby to create an elaborate nest. He’ll incorporate everything from twigs and grasses to bottle caps and string into his masterpiece, all in the hopes of wooing a lady. Now, art is imitating this incredible behavior seen in life.

The remarkable bird inspired New York-based artist Janelle Iglesias’s new exhibit, In High Feather, at the University at Buffalo. The immersive, two-story bower in the style of the Vogelkop bowerbird, isn’t intended to be an exact replica of the bird’s home, Iglesias says, but rather an artistic reimagining.

Iglesias recently visited the Arfak Mountains in Indonesia in search of what she calls “the most advanced avian architecture on earth.” Her trip was made possible with the help of a Jerome Foundation travel and study grant.

Iglesias says that the kinship she felt for the Vogelkop bowerbird extends beyond an appreciation for their constructions. She and the birds use locally sourced material, often repurposing discarded items, she says. “I felt like I needed to make some decisions about my practice that would align my [environmental and political] philosophies,” she explains.

The bowerbird uses the space they create for seduction, luring females to visit and check out what they’ve created, in much the same way an artist seeks an audience. In fact, Iglesias invited the public to watch her build the exhibit, which opened February 27.

The two-story installation in the Lightwell Gallery will also include images and field recordings from her trip, as well as discarded items she picked up, including Christmas trees and cereal boxes. Just like the bowerbirds’ creations, her invention is a wonder to behold.

In High Feather runs until May 10.

This video says about itself:

Documentation of Janelle Iglesias’ installation at BCA Firehouse Gallery, “Draw Back the Bow (or Kill Your Darlings),” 2010. Video & music by Jin Kim.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Ornithologist interviewed, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Careers with Birds: Interview with Kim Bostwick

10 Jan 2014

Kim Bostwick’s ground-breaking research on manakins has been featured in National Geographic Magazine and she’s currently the curator of the Bird and Mammal collections at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology‘s Museum of Vertebrates. Kim started as a young animal lover in rural Vermont and has since spent her life studying birds. Visit the Young Birders Network website (www.youngbirdersnetwork.net) to read more about careers in ornithology.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology writes about Ms Bostwick:

How a Bird Sings With Its Wings: Dr. Kim Bostwick’s field research centers on the Club-winged Manakin, a bird that makes a remarkable, high-pitched hum in one of the strangest ways imaginable. She discovered the secret over the course of many years, using experiments and high-speed video, and her website tells the story in fascinating detail and great video.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Young Birders Event in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Cornell Lab of Ornithology Young Birders Event 2013

28 jan 2014

A group of the brightest young birders gathers for one weekend each summer at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to explore their shared passions for science, nature, and birds.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology writes about this event in 2014:

Apply by March 15 for Young Birders Event

Our annual Young Birders Event is one long weekend of total immersion in the world of birds and science at the Cornell Lab. Attendees go birding, take classes from our scientists, explore our collections, discover careers, and make friends. The event is open to rising high school sophomores through seniors; 16 young people are chosen. Enrollment is competitive, but the experience will be unforgettable. This year’s event is July 10–13; thanks to Zeiss for making this event possible. Learn more and apply by March 15.

Enhanced by Zemanta