Purple heron migration, record numbers


This video from Asia is called Beautiful Purple Heron, Pheasant tailed Jacana, Black-headed Ibis, Pond Heron & Great Egret. Towards the end of the video, there is also an intermediate egret.

Before purple herons arrive for winter in southern Asia or Africa, they migrate from their more northern nesting areas.

On Monday 8 September, 427 purple herons flew south over the Dordtse Biesbosch bird counting point. A record number for one day in the Netherlands.

The total number for the whole Netherlands this autumn migration season so far is 1837. Nearly all those came from nests in the Netherlands, as they don’t breed further to the north. Sometimes, grey herons fly along with the migrating purple herons.

Women sue Catholic Church about sexual abuse


This video from Australia says about itself:

Church admits liability in school sex abuse

12 July 2010

The Catholic Church has admitted liability for the sexual abuse of girls at a primary school at Toowoomba in Queensland’s Darling Downs.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Injunction against church abuse

Added: Saturday 13 Sep 2014 09:10
Update: Saturday Sep 13 2014, 09:30

Six women who have been abused by clergy in their childhood days are taking the Roman Catholic Church to court. In the lawsuit, Thursday in Utrecht, they want to enforce that they and other victims of sexual abuse will still be able to file complaints, the newspaper Trouw reports.

The hotline for sexual abuse complaints has been closed since July 1 for cases which are legally time barred and whose possible perpetrators are no longer alive.

Especially men have used the chance to complain in recent years. The women going to court now want the time for filing complaints to be extended indefinitely.

Shame

According to the Foundation Women’s Platform about Ecclesiastical Child Abuse (VPKK) women “because of feelings of shame about abuse in their childhood (especially in the nineteen fifties and sixties), need more time to come out with their stories.”

The platform says that “we can still expect many cases. The number of women who will report eventually will be perhaps less than with men, but not many less.”

Ancient fortress discovery in Indonesia


Map of fortress in Semarang, photo Dutch national archive

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

12 Sep 2014, 16:45 (Update: 12-09-14, 17:19)

In the Indonesian city Semarang on Java, archaeologists have uncovered the foundations of an 18th century Dutch fort.

It was, according to experts, built around 1750 to house and protect Dutch soldiers. The fort certainly had five bastions, protruding defenses. which had Dutch names such as Bastion Amsterdam, Bastion Iron and Repairman.

The fortress was razed in 1824 because the structure was no longer able to accommodate all Dutch soldiers.

Five years ago

In 2009 the foundations were discovered on a piece of undeveloped land in Semarang.

Since then, research has been done. Four days ago the archaeologists started with the first excavation work. Two feet below the surface, they stumbled upon the foundations of the old Dutch fort. Hundreds of fragments of ceramic and glass jars were also found.

All of the bastions will never be exposed. At the place where they have been, condominiums will be built.

Dutch grey seals, immigrants from Britain


This video from England says about itself:

Some footage shot in the Farne Isles diving with Grey Seals.

Filmed with a Sony FX1 in a Gates FX1/Z1 housing with a Fathom Imaging wide-angle lens in ambient light.

Translated from IMARES research institute in the Netherlands:

September 10, 2014

In the Middle Ages, the gray seals in the Netherlands became extinct. Now they are back, gloriously so! Today here live the largest number of Atlantic gray seals of the European mainland. In less than thirty years this grew from some visitors to more than 3,000 individuals. It went so fast that it cannot be explained by the number of births only. Researchers from the research institute IMARES on Texel have now calculated that the seal population of Great Britain plays a large role in this story.

The British gray seal population bring permanently “immigrants” affecting the growth in the Dutch Wadden Sea. In spring and summer there are also another temporary ‘tourists’. “The development of the population in the Wadden Sea is strongly influenced by seals from the other side of the North Sea. Therefore, cooperation with other countries is extremely important for conservation, policy and research,” said biologist Sophie Brasseur. She has published, along with her colleagues, an article about the successful return of the gray seal in the scientific journal Marine Mammal Science.

See also here.

Discover four of the best places to see a grey seal in the UK: here.

Dragonfly feeding, video


This video is about a vagrant darter dragonfly feeding.

Marjo Steffen in the Netherlands made this video.