Thatcher let Mandela rot in apartheid prison


This video is called Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (2013) Official Trailer.

By Paddy McGuffin in Britain:

Thatcher left Mandela to rot in prison

Friday 3rd January 2013

PMs glossed over issue in controversial talks

Newly released cabinet papers put paid yesterday to longstanding Tory boasts that Margaret Thatcher used her controversial courting of South Africa’s apartheid-era government to help win the release of Nelson Mandela.

Government minutes from 1984, published under the 30-year rule, show that Thatcher made little or no effort to secure Mandela‘s freedom during her first official meeting with South African prime minister PW Botha.

The documents record a summit between Thatcher and Botha, supposedly to discuss the country’s policy towards its black population.

Yet the British PM did not mention Mandela once during the official discussion.

In a report sent by adviser John Coles to Roger Bone, then private secretary to Sir Geoffrey Howe, Number 10 suggested the issue was raised at a short “tete-a-tete.”

No note-takers were present during the discussion but Coles says the issue was raised by Thatcher, who was rebuffed by Botha who claimed he was unable to “interfere with the South African judicial process.”

In the officially minuted meeting that followed no further mention was made of the matter – apparently despite Foreign Office advice to do so.

Thatcher went on to infamously brand Mr Mandela and the ANC as “terrorists” in 1987, while the ultra right-wing Federation of Conservative Students notoriously wore “Hang Nelson Mandela” badges in the early 1980s.

In the wake of Mandela’s death Prime Minister David Cameron and other senior party figures have rushed to distance themselves from their previous stance.

But in a special parliamentary session former Labour cabinet minister Peter Hain claimed the Tories were attempting to “rewrite” the history books and attacked the Thatcher government for its “craven indulgence to apartheid rulers.”

“We all say in Britain we were against apartheid, and doubtless we were,” Mr Hain said.

“But some of us did things about it and others didn’t.

“But it really does stick in the craw, when Lord Tebbit, Charles Moore and others similar claim their complicity with apartheid, for that’s what I think it was, somehow bought its end.”

Film: Mandela- Long Walk to Freedom (12A): a critical review is here. Another one is here.

A new book on Joe Slovo and Ruth First pays due tribute to an inspirational couple in the struggle for liberation in South Africa, says JOHN HAYLETT: here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Humanitarian Award, in remembrance of Nelson Mandela


Image

Horty of the blog It Is What It Is has been so kind to nominate Dear Kitty. Some Blog for the HUMANITARIAN AWARD …. IN REMEMBRANCE OF NELSON MANDELA.

Thanks so much, dear Horty, for this nomination, and for all you do!

More about Nelson Mandela is here.

Barbara, who created this award, writes about it:

“I created this award several days ago. I am spreading it out to worthy people. I can do it because I designed it.”

Recipients should nominate 5 people how have demonstrated through their love of writing a Love for the Human Family which encompasses all without regards for differences.

Give credit to the person who passes the award to you.

~~RULES~~

To be eligible for this award a blogger must blog about the importance or One World, One Family of Mankind and One Love.

My nominees are:

1. GOOD BLACK NEWS

2. Prison Pork

3. LE MONDE N’EST PAS ROND

4. Feminist conversations on Caribbean life

5. Wife and War

Nelson Mandela, Obama and dictators


This video says about itself:

SABC TV Live Stream Coverage: Nelson Mandela‘s funeral in Qunu

15 Dec 2013

The funeral service of South Africa’s first democratically-elected president, Nelson Mandela.

From Human Rights First in the USA:

Top 5 Hypocrites at Mandela’s Funeral

12-16-2013

By Diana Sayed

At Mandela’s memorial service on Tuesday, President Obama delivered a speech in which he said “Mandela showed us the power of action; of taking risks on behalf of our ideals” that “[t]here are too many of us who happily embrace Madiba’s legacy of racial reconciliation… who claim solidarity with Madiba’s struggle for freedom, but do not tolerate dissent from their own people.”

But some of those countries who sent representatives are top United States allies that persecute those who dissent:

1. Bahrain –Ambassador to the UAE Mohammed bin Hamad Al Ma’awda

Ever since Bahrain’s democratic uprising began in February 2011, the regime has brutally cracked down on activists. Many prominent human rights defenders have been targeted and imprisoned, including Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja, former president and co-founder of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights (BCHR), currently serving a life sentence after being arrested in April 2011. Nabeel Rajab, current president of the BCHR, is serving the remainder of his 2-year sentence for Tweeting about the government’s prime minister and for participating in illegal gatherings. Zainab Al-Khawaja was arrested for sitting on a highway in protest of her father’s detention. She was formally charged with disrupting traffic and insulting an officer and remains in prison today.

2. Pakistan – President Mamnoon Hussain

Many journalists that report on matters perceived as offensive or critical of the government are threatened, harassed, and intimidated by a host of actors, including members of Pakistan’s security and intelligence apparatus. One of the most notable cases was that of Umar Cheema, who was abducted in September 2010 by unknown assailants, stripped, beaten, and photographed in humiliating positions.

3. Saudi Arabia – Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz al-Saud

Saudi Arabia has no elections, parliament, or political parties. King Abdullah and his family exercise unchecked power, and the kingdom remains one of the most repressive countries in the world, particularly for its 9 million female citizens, who are prevented from holding many jobs or driving and are considered as chattel under oppressive guardianship laws. Practicing any religion other than Islam is banned. Mohammad al-Qahtani is co-founder of the Saudi Arabian human rights organization Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association (ACPRA) and, in 2011, its leader before he was sentenced to ten years in prison on several charges relating to his peaceful activism.

4. Ethiopia – His Excellency Ato Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister

Hailemariam Desalegn Boshe has been Prime Minister of Ethiopia since 2012 following the death of Meles Zenawi. Hailemariam was elected as the Chair of the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), the ruling party. Prior to his rule the 2010 election, in which Prime Minister Meles Zenawi’s party won a remarkable 99.6 percent of the vote, he closed down space for political dissent and independent criticism. The crackdown included attacks and arrests of prominent opposition figures, the shutting down of newspapers and assaults on journalists critical of the government. Eskinder Nega, a prominent Ethiopian journalist, was sentenced to 18 years in prison on in July 2012 under the country’s Anti-Terrorism Proclamation of 2009 for publishing an online column critical of the use of the terrorism law to silence dissent and calling for the Ethiopian government to respect freedom of expression and end torture in the country’s prisons.

5. Uganda – His Excellency Yoweri Kagota Museveni, President

Museveni abolished term limits before the 2006 elections after nearly three decades in office and proceeded to launch legal attacks on independent journalists and harass opposition parties. NGOs have also documented numerous cases of unlawful detention and torture by the country’s Joint Anti-Terrorism Task Force. Uganda came under international condemnation in 2010 for a proposed law, still pending, that would punish homosexuality with harsh sentences including the death penalty. The country’s most prominent gay rights activist, David Kato, was beaten to death in January 2011 just weeks after a popular tabloid published his photo along with the caption, “Hang Them.”

These regimes and other dictatorships are key allies of the United States. President Obama is right to criticize those who suppress dissent but his words are undermined by his administration’s support for repressive regimes that do just that.

A comment to this blog post by Vanessa Blaylock says:

I certainly won’t defend the atrocities you call out, but why pick on nations from that region and imply that Obama/USA has some sort of moral high ground? What about Chelsea Manning, given a longer prison sentence than even Mandela for telling the truth? What about Edward Snowden living in exile in that freedom loving country Russia because the USA can’t handle the truth? Obama/USA have no monopoly on freedom and no love of truth. Let’s not even start on Senator Lieberman’s extra-legal persecution of the journalists at Wikileaks or the Bush v. Gore forged election.

6 Things Nelson Mandela believed that most people won’t talk about: here.

Peaceful Activists Face Inhumane Conditions in Bahrain’s Overcrowded Central Prison: here.

Uganda: Former national football team coach arrested for allegedly having gay sex with player: here.

Nelson Mandela and the Daily Mail, from hatred to hypocrisy


This video about South Africa is called Nelson Mandela “I Am Prepared to Die” speech (with subtitles/transcript).

By Solomon Hughes in Britain:

The Daily Mail‘s hatred of Mandela

Friday 13th December 2013

Today the Mail is singing Madiba‘s praises, but it wasn’t always so keen on this towering figure of resistance. SOLOMON HUGHES takes a look

Most British news reports on Nelson Mandela‘s death note the number of streets and buildings named after the ANC leader in Britain, showing how much British people cared about the great man.

They don’t say how hard the Tories and their friends opposed the Mandela name.

Now David Cameron says Mandela was a hero. But when it mattered, when he was imprisoned by apartheid’s jailers, the Tories were enraged by Labour councils supporting Mandela.

The Tories’ big ally in their anti-Mandela campaign was the Daily Mail.

The Mail complained this week that Mandela’s memorial ceremony was “a shambolic disgrace to his name.” But it hated his name when he was imprisoned.

London was the international HQ of the Anti-Apartheid Movement and Britain was a vital base of the ANC.

Britain saw big public protests and heroic underground support for Mandela and his fellow fighters.

Naming streets and buildings after Mandela was a small part of this. It encouraged the campaigners and spread his name – to the disgust of the Mail and the Tories.

A search of the Mail archives about Mandela throws up story after story denouncing the Mandela renamings.

In August 1986 both the Mail and the Tories were enraged that Labour-led Coventry Council wanted to name its new archive building after Mandela instead of poet Philip Larkin.

The Mail quoted Tory spokesman Stan Hodson saying: “Mandela has a record of being a terrorist. He has nothing to do with Coventry. What will naming a public building after him do for our tourist industry?”

This was part of a long campaign in the Mail against naming streets and buildings after Mandela.

In September ’82 it had a page three splash on “How the left turned Lark Rise into Soweto Close” following Cardiff Council‘s decision to name roads in a new housing estate after South African heroes.

A shocked Mail reported: “The quiet cul-de-sacs will be labelled Mandela Avenue, Biko Close.”

Laing Homes, building the new private estate, was outraged, complaining: “How can we possibly sell people homes when they hear the names of the roads they are in?

“We are in the business of selling homes, not playing politics. People want to live in friendly sounding streets, not places named after foreign political leaders.”

Inevitably the deputy leader of the council’s Tory group Gwilym M Jones said: “We will be opposing the names.”

In 1983 the Mail carried several stories about Camden Council’s decision to rename one of its roads “Mandela Street.”

Camden proposed the change because the Anti-Apartheid Movement actually had its headquarters in the road.

But the Mail was enraged that “the left-wingers on Camden Council” wanted to name the road “after the jailed black African nationalist.”

The Mail said residents were “furious” at the name change and in “revolt” against the Mandela name.

It claimed that everyone on the street with the exception of the Anti-Apartheid Movement and the Central Electricity Generating Board signed a petition against renaming their street after Mandela. If so there must be some very embarrassed residents in Camden right now.

In November ’84 the Mail reported that “left-wing” Harlow Council had renamed a road “Mandela Street,” finding an unnamed local to denounce it as “utterly confusing.”

It didn’t stop at street names. In November ’86 Manchester Council put Nelson Mandela on its Xmas cards.

The Mail‘s headline – “The left gives Santa the sack” – suggests it was not keen.

Manchester Tory MP Winston Churchill – grandson of the more famous Churchill – told the Mail this “tasteless propaganda is profoundly disturbing.”

The Mail‘s campaign was crystallised by Paul Johnson, who was given a whole page to denounce the “Crazy street warfare of the left” in July ’85.

Johnson was still angry with Cardiff councillors wanting street names to “commemorate revolutionary leaders such as South African blacks Nelson Mandela and Steve Biko.”

Johnson said the street names were “deliberately provocative gestures,” adding that calling a road “Mandela” was done by the “fanatics who run Labour’s local government regimes” who “never miss an opportunity to set people at each others throats. It is part of the Marxist doctrine of class warfare.”

Johnson wasn’t just worried about support for revolutionary leaders and “South African blacks.”

Give in on Mandela and “where would it end?”

The Mail‘s columnist argued that “women’s lib, increasingly powerful in the Labour Party, would stick its oar in and thousands of streets would be named after harpies and harridans.” Worse, “homosexuals, another Labour pressure group, would demand their quota. We would have scores of Oscar Streets and Wilde Roads.”

So for the Mail, supporting Mandela was as bad as supporting gay people or women.

This disgusting reactionary cocktail might look like something only Johnson – a ridiculous right-wing buffoon – would mix.

But his views were reflected in the high levels of Tory government.

When Michael Howard began drawing up his famously bigoted Section 28 against treating gay people as equals, he originally wanted to use the same law against councils supporting Mandela.

Just like Johnson, he seemed to think Labour councils naming streets after Mandela and being gay-friendly was all part of one plot.

Papers I got under freedom of information show that Section 28 wasn’t just proposed to stop councils “promoting homosexuality” and banning “the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship” in schools.

The law originally aimed to stop any kind of “left-wing political activity” by local councils.

Howard’s civil servants wanted the law to be a “proscription of a number of activities undertaken by local authorities in areas peripheral to their functions.

“These include the promotion of homosexuality but also other activities such as anti-apartheid and anti-nuclear activities.”

Howard agreed. Seeing councils being gay-friendly was part of “all the peripheral political activity of left-wing councils” and he was considering “proscribing some other activities by local authorities, such as anti-apartheid, anti-police and anti-nuclear activities.”

Hurray for the Blackshirts, Daily Mail 1934 fascist propaganda

The Daily Mail has a long history of far Right sympathies, as this 1934 article by its owner, Viscount Rothermere, in support of the Blackshirts of British nazi leader Sir Oswald Mosley, shows.

Nelson Mandela’s death resulted in an outpouring of tributes and veneration such as no other political or world figure could inspire, perhaps with the exception of Muhammad Ali. Like Mandela, Ali stood up against racial and social injustice as a young man and thereby transcended the confines of his background to become an international icon: here.

Nelson Mandela has been laid to rest – but his legacy must not be; Gary Younge: here.

Nelson Mandela, eulogy by Barack Obama


This video from the USA says about itself:

The Right Wing Vs Nelson Mandela

6 Dec 2013

“The world is celebrating Nelson Mandela as a selfless visionary who led his country out of the grips of apartheid into democracy and freedom. But some of the very people lavishing praise on South Africa’s first black president worked tirelessly to undermine his cause and portray the African National Congress he lead as pawns of the Soviet Union.

In fact, American conservatives have long been willing to overlook South Africa’s racist apartheid government in service of fighting communism abroad…”.* The timeline of efforts and propaganda against Mandela is broken down by Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian, John Iadarola (host, TYT University and Common Room) and comedian Jimmy Dore on The Young Turks.

*Read more here.

Today, the big commemoration for Nelson Mandela in Soweto, Johannesburg in South Africa.

Though the rain poured down mercilessly, ten thousands of people in the stadium kept singing and dancing to celebrate the life of, and to honour this deceased freedom fighter.

There were various speeches by politicians. Namibia was the only African country apart from South Africa with its own speaker.

One of the speeches was by Barack Obama, president of the United States. Before speaking, he shook hands with Raul Castro, president of Cuba; also an orator today, announced as “a speaker from a tiny island which helped to liberate us”.

This video, recorded in Soweto today, is called Raul Castro Speech at Nelson Mandela Memorial.

After Castro had finished his speech, he got a special thank you, again for Cuban help in the anti-Apartheid struggle, and for Cuban help today, in health care and other areas.

The Secret History of How Cuba Helped End Apartheid in South Africa: here.

Oops – John McCain Blasts Obama-Raul Castro Handshake, Forgets He Met With Al-Qaeda Fighters: here.

John McCain admits Castro-Hitler comparison was “gross exaggeration”: here.

This video, recorded in South Africa, says about itself:

Obama’s Complete Nelson Mandela Memorial Speech

10 Dec 2013

President Barack Obama‘s full speech at memorial service today for Nelson Mandela.

Let us take a closer look at the eulogy for Mandela by Obama. We know he is a very good orator. Now, from form to content. What were the strong points and the weak points in his speech? What did he say; what did he not say?

A strong point was comparing Nelson Mandela to other famous freedom fighters: Mahatma Gandhi; Dr Martin Luther King; and Abraham Lincoln. Three individuals, when they were still alive, loved by millions all over the world. But also with bitter enemies among powerful privileged people. Three individuals with an extreme Right fringe still hating them today. Like with Mandela.

Obama, deservedly, got much applause when he mentioned Mandela‘s fellow fighters against Apartheid: Oliver Tambo and Walter Sisulu. People, who, together with Nelson Mandela, had been put on a list of “terrorists” by previous United States governments. Oliver Tambo died in 1993; still on the US government list of “terrorists”. Walter Sisulu died in 2003; still on the US government list of “terrorists”.

Here, Obama might have said: “Nelson Mandela was only removed from the United States list of terrorists in 2011. What a shame that he was ever put on it. And what a shame that Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo and others died while still being on that hateful list. I apologize”. Obama did not say that. Maybe, he looked at the stadium bleachers, and saw George W Bush sitting there. And Obama did not want to dissociate himself too much from his predecessor’s policies. What a pity.

Dutch NOS TV, reporting on the Mandela farewell ceremony, mentioned briefly that in 1962, the Apartheid regime probably had been able to arrest Mandela because the United States CIA had tipped the racist South African government off.

A point which Raul Castro did mention briefly was Nelson Mandela’s pro-peace views. Obama might have said: “Mandela was a strong opponent of the Iraq war. I opposed that war then as well. So, I have no trouble admitting that Nelson Mandela was right in this”. Obama did not say that. A missed chance. Oh yes, briefly, in passing, Obama mentioned the word “peace”. Without connecting it to any speech or action by Nelson Mandela. Without connecting it to Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia or elsewhere where United Stsates armed forces recently, or still today, waged or still wage war.

Correctly, Obama implied that some of the politicians now joining in the mourning for Mandela are insincere, as, contrary to the spirit of the African liberation fighter, they oppress their people. However, he did not mention that so many of these hypocritical politicians are close allies of the United States government: like the British Conservatives and the Spanish Partido Popular. And Obama did not mention how often United States government policies; in Guantanamo Bay torture prison, which Obama promised to close but which is still open; in CIA secret prisons in many countries; in drone attacks killing civilians; in NSA spying on billions of people all over the world; are at variance with Mandela’s ideals of democracy.

When President Obama denounced world leaders who praised Nelson Mandela while crushing dissent and resisting reform in their own countries, he should have had a look in the mirror: here.

Mandela’s fight against nuclear weapons – by @VincentIntondi: here.

Nelson Mandela, Feminist: here.

The Nelson Mandela of the 21st century is right here, right now. We just can’t see it. We’re too busy spitting on him and calling him a terrorist: here.

US religious fundamentalists, Dutch nazis against Nelson Mandela


This video says about itself:

Nelson Mandela first interview 1961

Nelson Mandela‘s first interview in 1961 for ITN … . A young Mandela flushes out his strategy for reclaiming fundamental rights for black South Africans from his hideout before his arrest.

Nelson Mandela died. Billions of people all over the world sincerely mourn and honour this freedom fighter.

However, a minority of the tears now is not so sincere. Like in the case of British Conservatives who used to call Nelson Mandela a “terrorist”, and to call for him to be hanged, while he was alive. Or in the case of the Spanish conservative ruling party, which used to prefer dictator Franco to Mandela while Mandela was alive, but who now shed crocodile tears as well.

On the extreme Right side of the political spectrum, some show their anti-Mandela bigotry even now.

The Westboro Baptist Church in the USA is infamous for its homophobia and its anti-Semitism.

Now, they are planning to disrupt the ex-president of South Africa’s funeral with an anti-Mandela protest. They say they thank God for killing Mandela. They claim that is because Nelson Mandela divorced and remarried. Extremely probably, they hate Mandela too for abolishing the anti-LGBTQ laws of the Apartheid regime in South Africa. Plus they will hate Mandela for the usual far Right “reasons”, for supposedly being a “communist terrorist” etc.

We, the Baptist Convention of South Africa, as represented by its leadership, have noted with utmost disdain the insensitive, unbaptistic and unchristian statements issued by the Westboro Baptist Church in USA, about out former President, Dr Nelson Mandela: here.

Dutch neo-nazi party Nederlandse Volksunie (NVU) on 6 December 2013 put an article on their Facebook page (no, I will not link to them) by Geert Wilders admirer Joost Niemoller. The article claims that Mandela changed a South Africa where things supposedly went well under the Apartheid regime, to a “hell on earth”.

Constant Kusters, Nederlandse Volksunie fuehrer, proposes in the election platforms of his party for the 2014 Dutch local elections, to remove the name Nelson Mandela from streets, bridges etc. named after the South African freedom fighter in various towns in the Netherlands.

The NVU was founded in 1971, “with as key purpose to rehabilitate convicted WW-II war [nazi] criminals“, as Wikipedia says.

Soon after that, a Dutch football club played a European cup match in a big stadium in Portugal. The dictatorship in Portugal then waged bloody colonial wars in Angola and its other colonies. In Angola, Africans had to work on Portuguese coffee plantations in conditions very akin to slavery. In the Netherlands and other countries, anti-racists and anti-colonialists campaigned for a boycott of coffee from these plantations in Angola.

During the football match, millions of TV spectators saw big signs, saying in Dutch: “Importeer en drink Angola koffie” [Import and drink coffee from Angola]. The Portuguese regime had put these signs around the football pitch; tipped off to do so by their Nederlandse Volksunie sympathizers.

Present NVU fuehrer Constant Kusters was still a non-political toddler when this happened. However, he is continuing his party’s racist policies on southern Africa which date from the NVU’s earliest days.

Al Sharpton Rips Historical US Policy Towards Nelson Mandela: here.

12 Mandela Quotes That Won’t Be In the Corporate Media Obituaries: here.

World leaders continued to heap praise on anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela over the weekend. But it was at grass-roots level that true affection for the revolutionary leader was being expressed: here.

Latin American solidarity activists paid heartfelt tributes to South African liberator Nelson Mandela at the weekend: here.

Fred Phelps dies: here.