Good Brazilian birds and monkeys news


This video is called Red-necked Tanager (Tangara cyanocephala).

From Wildlife Extra:

Critical Brazilian reserve expanded to protect Endangered birds and monkey

Two new additions to Brazilian reserve will help protect rare birds, critically endangered monkey

October 2013. Two new properties totalling about 237 acres (96 hectares) have been added to the Brazil’s Serra Bonita Reserve, expanding protection for six rare birds, a critically endangered monkey, the yellow-breasted capuchin, and a wide diversity of flora and additional fauna, including 330 bird species. Another measure of the conservation value of the region was illustrated in the 1990s when a world record of 458 tree species was counted in an area the size of a football field.

The acquisition of the two parcels was a joint effort involving three conservation organizations-American Bird Conservancy (ABC), Instituto Uiraçu, and Rainforest Trust (formerly called World Land Trust-US). Funding for the purchase was provided by these groups, in addition to the Robert Wilson Charitable Trust and other private individuals and groups.

Moist submontane Atlantic rainforest

The reserve is located in the Serra Bonita Mountain Range, which is one of the last remnants of moist submontane Atlantic rainforest in southern Bahia. This range covers an area of approximately 18,525 acres (7,500 hectares), located in the municipalities of Camacan and Pau Brazil, about 80 miles (130 km) from the port city of Ilhéus on the Atlantic Coast.

Birds of conservation concern that depend on the area include six species that are on the published IUCN threatened bird species list: the Bahia Tyrannulet, (endangered-will be downlisted); Pink-legged Graveteiro, (vulnerable); Plumbeous Antvireo, (vulnerable); Salvadori’s Antwren, (vulnerable); Seedeater, (vulnerable); and Temminck’s Seedeater, (vulnerable). These latter two species are attracted to the area’s seeding bamboo.

93% Atlantic Rainforest already lost

“This project adds irreplaceable acreage to a high-priority conservation area. With more than 93 percent of the Atlantic Rainforest already lost, we cannot afford to lose any more of these forests with their precious diversity of birds, monkeys, butterflies, and thousands of other species. The collaboration among ABC, Rainforest Trust, and the Instituto Uiraçu shows how, by working together, groups can make a lasting difference in the race to save these unique and rare habitats,” said David Younkman, Vice President for Conservation at ABC.

Accommodation for birders

“We consider it a top priority to raise the funds to expand the protections of the whole mountain through land purchase. Serra Bonita Mountain is still almost totally covered with either pristine or secondary forest. This expansion could easily be accomplished since most farmers have already put their land up for sale due to the collapse of the cacao economy,” said Dr. Vitor Becker, Director of Research at Instituto Uiraçu. Becker added that the reserve is open for business and has a wonderful lodge that can accommodate small groups of birders.

“Serra Bonita’s biological diversity is astonishing. The more we learn about this unique site, the more we realize it’s a wildlife gem worth protecting. As the Atlantic Rainforests of Brazil continue to be destroyed, the importance of acting now to save Serra Bonita grows. Rainforest Trust is proud to work with ABC and Instituto Uiraçu to ensure that Serra Bonita, and the many endangered species it contains, receives the protection it truly deserves,” said Dr. Paul Salaman, CEO of Rainforest Trust.

The Serra Bonita Mountain Range is part of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest biome which contains the highest levels of biological diversity and endemism in the Western Hemisphere. It is recognized as one of the five most species-rich biomes in the world and is considered a biodiversity hotspot. Sadly, it is still subject to high rates of habitat loss and is ranked as one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world. Serra Bonita Reserve protects an important fragment of this historically vast habitat. The Atlantic Forest has lost more than 93 percent of its original cover (most of that in the last 50 years) and the devastation continues at an alarming rate.

Fortunately, the Serra Bonita Mountain Range is still well-conserved, with approximately 50 percent of the land cover a pristine forest of extreme biological importance. The remaining area is a forest-dominated landscape composed of a mosaic of forests in different successional stages, with largely secondary forests in advanced stages of recuperation, interspersed with cabruca (traditional Brazilian agroforests in which cacao trees are planted under thinned-out native forests) and small areas of pasture. Serra Bonita’s forests also protect numerous springs which provide fresh water for the inhabitants of Camacan and Pau Brazil.

Situated at the centre of Serra Bonita range, the Serra Bonita Reserve Complex (SBR) is a private conservation initiative which comprises a “consortium” of privately owned properties totaling about 4,446 acres (1,800 hectares). In 2004, 2,964 acres (1,200 hectares) of the area were converted into four private natural heritage reserves. The SBR is the second largest area of private reserves in the Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor and is seen as a pioneer in the protection of submontane forest in the region.

400 species of birds

The diversity of species on Serra Bonita is extremely rich, and the area has been designated as an Important Bird Area. A preliminary study estimated that some 400 species of birds inhabit the mountain range, nine of which are threatened and 59 that are endemic to the Atlantic Forest. The SBR is also the only designated protected area that preserves the habitat of the Pink-legged Graveteiro, or Acrobatornis fonsecai (a black and gray bird, endemic to the Atlantic Forest and IUCN listed as vulnerable). The species represents a genus and species only discovered in 1996 and whose range is restricted to this region.

Visit the Serra Bonita

The Serra Bonita research station and lodge provides high-quality accommodation to researchers, ecotourists, and birdwatchers. All income generated goes toward maintenance and further conservation at the reserve. Those interested in visiting should contact Clemira Souza at clemirasouza@gmail.com.

Ape, monkey evolution discoveries in Tanzania


Artist’s impression of the newly discovered Rukwapithecus, front, and Nsungwepithecus, right (Mauricio Anton)

From Big News Network (ANI):

Oldest evidence of split between Old World monkeys and apes uncovered

Thursday 16th May, 2013

Discovery of two fossils from the East African Rift has provided new information about the evolution of primates, according to a study.

The team’s findings document the oldest fossils of two major groups of primates: the group that today includes apes and humans (hominoids), and the group that includes Old World monkeys such as baboons and macaques (cercopithecoids).

Geological analyses of the study site indicate that the finds are 25 million years old, significantly older than fossils previously documented for either of the two groups.

Both primates are new to science, and were collected from a single fossil site in the Rukwa Rift Basin of Tanzania.

Rukwapithecus fleaglei is an early hominoid represented by a mandible preserving several teeth. Nsungwepithecus gunnelli is an early cercopithecoid represented by a tooth and jaw fragment.

The primates lived during the Oligocene epoch, which lasted from 34 to 23 million years ago. For the first time, the study documents that the two lineages were already evolving separately during this geological period.

“The late Oligocene is among the least sampled intervals in primate evolutionary history, and the Rukwa field area provides a first glimpse of the animals that were alive at that time from Africa south of the equator,” said Nancy Stevens, an associate professor of paleontology in Ohio University’s Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine who leads the paleontological team.

Prior to these finds, the oldest fossil representatives of the hominoid and cercopithecoid lineages were recorded from the early Miocene, at sites dating millions of years younger.

The new discoveries are particularly important for helping to reconcile a long-standing disagreement between divergence time estimates derived from analyses of DNA sequences from living primates and those suggested by the primate fossil record, Stevens said.

Studies of clock-like mutations in primate DNA have indicated that the split between apes and Old World monkeys occurred between 30 million and 25 million years ago.

“Fossils from the Rukwa Rift Basin in southwestern Tanzania provide the first real test of the hypothesis that these groups diverged so early, by revealing a novel glimpse into this late Oligocene terrestrial ecosystem,” Stevens said.

The new fossils are the first primate discoveries from this precise location within the Rukwa deposits, and two of only a handful of known primate species from the entire late Oligocene, globally.

The scientists scanned the specimens in the Ohio University’s MicroCT scanner, allowing them to create detailed 3-dimensional reconstructions of the ancient specimens that were used for comparisons with other fossils.

“This is another great example that underscores how modern imaging and computational approaches allow us to address more refined questions about vertebrate evolutionary history,” said Patrick O’Connor, co-author and professor of anatomy in Ohio University’s Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine.

The study was published online in Nature this week led by Ohio University scientists.

See also here. And here. And here.

In Tanzania, Nature Provides Unseen Value for Farmers: here.

Monkeys ride capybara, photo


Friends in Low Places Supervliegzus 2010/Getty Images

Popular Science writes about this photo:

Megapixels: Monkeys Take A Ride On The World’s Largest Rodent

Wheeeeeeee!

By Susan E. Matthews

Posted 03.15.2013 at 3:30 pm

In the rainforests of South America, squirrel monkeys and capybaras would never meet. While squirrel monkeys live in trees up to 60 feet high, capybaras—the world’s largest rodents—dwell along river banks.

But at the Beekse Bergen Safari Park in the Netherlands, the two species have shared an enclosure for eight years now, and they seem to be friends. The monkeys ride and groom the capybaras. They even eat and play together. Interspecies relationships are more frequent between captive animals, says behavioral ecologist Marc Bekoff. Because keepers feed them, they can spend time getting to know their enclosure mates instead of foraging for food. In 2005, a similar arrangement at a zoo in Japan went sour when a capybara mauled a monkey to death. But Bekoff says that, for the most part, zoos are safe environments for odd relationships.

Colombian graffiti art helps monkeys


From the Conservation International Blog:

On Streets of Bogotá, Graffiti Art Raises Environmental Awareness

Last year, CI’s visual storytelling team traveled to Colombia to document graffiti artists in Bogotá. Street art is a popular and powerful mode of expression in the Colombian capital; recently, prominent street artists partnered with CI and the Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation to raise awareness about environmental issues while trying to steer young people away from drugs and crime. Today on the blog, one of them shares his most recent conservation-themed mural with us.

mural-painting team in Bogotá

David “Wap” Suarez (top right) poses with his mural-painting team. (photo courtesy of David Suarez)

My name is David Suarez, and I am 29 years old. I have spent 13 of those years painting art on the streets of Bogotá under the pseudonym “Wap.”

I started drawing during childhood; probably due to the amount of anime and cartoons that I watched and collected, I started to lean toward illustration and art. I saw graffiti in videos and movies that I watched at that time (1997-98), and I was struck by the letters, colors, culture — and above all, the fact that it could be painted on the street where everyone could see it.

Some time went by before I got access to my first spray-paint cans to make my first piece, which was a total disaster. But I kept trying, learning from various painting and drawing techniques, color theory, etc. Finally in 2004, I and another street artist founded a group called “dot exe crew” — one of the most important in the history of graffiti in Bogotá.

mural in Bogotá

David “Wap” Suarez working on a mural in Bogotá. (photo courtesy of David Suarez)

We started painting murals not only thinking about the stylistic letters and use of color, but we also began to experiment with illustration of narrative and story, taking our graffiti concepts to a more professional and artistic level. This technique became popular among other taggers/artists during that time. This is how I came to paint the first mural on biodiversity, as well as work for corporate brands.

Parallel to this, in the eastern hills of Bogotá’s Chapinero neighborhood where I live, I helped to found Artes Urbanas (Urban Arts) with friends and local school districts that were involved in various manifestations of hip-hop culture. Artes Urbanas was a youth club that provided young people with a space to be creative and avoid getting involved in drugs and crime. There, I taught screening, airbrushing and drawing.

This project was very successful, and we were immediately exposed to many institutions and foundations that wanted to support us — including CI, with whom we began painting murals under the water ecosystem restoration project in Chapinero. These themes began to interest me more and more, so I started to do murals on these subjects independently.

After seven years of work with Artes Urbanas, due to some differences with members of the youth club, I left and the project died. It left me with great experiences and precedents, as art is my life. I continued painting murals on wildlife trafficking, on the Amazon, on the eastern hills of Bogotá, and other issues that don’t have anything to do with the environment but are part of the reality of my city.

Recently, I received the news that CI wanted to provide a grant to Artes Urbanas to paint a mural on the primates of Colombia. As Artes Urbanas was no longer, the solution was to divide the grant between two people for the preparation of two murals on endemic species of primates.

painting a mural of primates in Colombia in Bogotá

David “Wap” Suarez and his team working on a mural depicting the primates of Colombia in Bogotá. (photo courtesy of David Suarez)

For issues of conflicting interests and limited time and budget, I was not able to go to the Amazon to meet my primate brothers in person. However, I received my half of the grant and did my best to maximize the resources I had to paint the mural. I researched everything about Colombia’s primates on the Internet. CI provided me with a copy of their scientific book “Primates of Colombia” and other sources of information. And so I painted a huge mural of nearly 10 feet in height and about 100 feet in length in a busy area of Bogotá. My team and I are very grateful to CI for believing in and supporting our art.

mural depicting the primates of Colombia in Bogotá

The completed primate mural, which includes depictions of spider, howler and saki monkeys. Click here to zoom in. (photo courtesy of David Suarez)

My newest project, called “Factory of Ideas” has to do with restoring public spaces and taking up some of the projects developed with Artes Urbanas. I’m painting murals continuously; since the primates of Colombia mural, I have made two more and I hope to continue painting for much longer.

As for people who took the time to read this humble street story, my message to you is to care for the environment and support the arts — if not financially, then at least by respecting their importance. We should focus on making our environment something positive for everyone, just as I’ve been trying to do all this time.

David “Wap” Suarez is a street artist in Bogotá, Colombia.

Read a version of this post in Spanish here (scroll down).

Mexican howler monkeys in trouble


This video is called Wild Howler Monkeys at Iberostar Tucan Quetzal Mexico.

From Wildlife Extra:

Howler monkeys increasingly stressed by human disturbance

New research shows that disturbed habitats are resulting in increasingly poor diets for monkeys, and that the additional time and energy required to find food is causing concerning levels of stress in already critically endangered primates.

January 2013. Endangered Mexican howler monkeys are consuming more leaves and less fruit as a result of habitat disturbance by humans which is forcing them to invest much more time foraging for sustenance and leading to increased ‘stress’ levels, as detected through hormone analysis.

The research took place in the tropical rainforests of the Mexican state of Veracruz, which are being deforested and fragmented by human activity – primarily the clearing of forest for cattle raising. It shows that increases in howler monkey ‘travel time’ – the amount of time needed to find requisite nourishment – are leading to increases in levels of stress hormones called glucocorticoids. These hormones are not only indicators of stress, but are also known to relate to diminished reproductive success and lower survival rates.

Researchers believe the study could serve as a model for behavioural change and resulting health implications more generally in primates living in habitats disturbed by human activities, such as deforestation.

Dr Jacob Dunn from Cambridge’s Department of Biological Anthropology, who carried out the research, said “Howlers are arboreal primates, that is to say they spend their wholes lives in the trees. As forests are fragmented, the howlers become cut off, isolated on forest ‘islands’ that increasingly lack the fruit which provide an important component of their natural diet. This has led to the monkeys expending ever more time and effort foraging for food, often increasing leaf consumption when their search is, quite literally, fruitless.”

Fruit cycle

Fruit occurs in natural cycles, and the monkeys will naturally revert to ‘fallback’ foods, including leaves, when fruit is scarce. But as habitats shrink, and fruit is harder to find, leaves from second-choice plants, such as lianas, have increased in the Mexican howlers’ diet.

While leaves may sound like a plentiful resource in a rainforest, many leaves are difficult to digest and can be filled with toxins – a natural defence mechanism in most trees and plants – so the monkeys are actually forced to spend more time seeking out the right foliage to eat, such as new shoots which are generally less toxic.

Fruit is vital to monkey diet

Dunn added “The traditional view was that the leaves exploited by howler monkeys were an abundant food source – but this is not the case. The monkeys rely much more heavily on fruit than previously believed, and when turning to foliage for food – as they are increasingly forced to do – they have to be highly selective in the leaves they consume, visiting lots of different trees. This leads to the increased ‘travel time’ and consequent high levels of stress we are seeing in these primates as their habitats disintegrate.”

Faeces analysed

As trying to catch the howlers to examine them would in itself be highly stressful for the animal, the best way of evaluating stress levels in wild primates is by analysing their faeces for glucocorticoid stress hormones, which are general to all vertebrates. Through statistical modelling, the researchers were able to determine that it is the ‘travel time’ – rather than the increased foliage intake – causing high levels of stress.

“Monkeys in disturbed habitats suffering high levels of stress is in itself unsurprising perhaps, but now we think we know why, the root cause from the primates perspective. Our results also highlight the importance of preserving and planting fruit trees – particularly those species such as figs that can produce fruit during periods of general fruit scarcity – for the conservation of howler monkeys¨ said Dr Jurgi Cristóbal-Azkarate, also from Cambridge, who led the research in collaboration with Dr Joaquim Vea from the University of Barcelona.

The authors say that further studies are required to fully understand the significance of increases in stress in howler monkeys living in disturbed habitats. “Determining the full relevance of our results for the conservation of primates living in forest fragments will require long-term studies of stress hormones and survival”, said Dunn.

The research was published in the International Journal of Primatology.

Rhesus monkeys and generosity, research


This video about rhesus macaques is called Monkey Troop Mourns Loss of Baby.

From the Indo-Asian News Service:

Even monkey brains are wired to give

Monday 24th December, 2012

Researchers have found, as the season for giving sets in, that even monkey brains respond to the act of giving.

During a task involving rhesus macaques, three distinct areas of the brain were found to be involved in weighing benefits to oneself against benefits to the other, according to Duke University researchers.

The team used sensitive electrodes to detect the activity of individual neurons (nerve cells) as the animals weighed different scenarios, whether to reward themselves, the other monkey or nobody at all, the journal Nature Neuroscience reports.

Calculating the social aspects of the reward system seems to be a combination of action by two centres involved in calculating all sorts of rewards and a third centre that adds the social dimension, says Michael Platt, director of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences who led the study, according to a Duke statement.

Using a computer screen to allocate juice rewards, the monkeys preferred to reward themselves first and foremost. But they also chose to reward the other monkey when it was either that or nothing for either of them.

They also were more likely to give the reward to a monkey they knew over one they didn’t, and preferred to give to lower status than higher status monkeys, and had almost no interest in giving the juice to an inanimate object.