Lions, new film


This video is called Lion Ark – Official Trailer.

From Wildlife Extra:

ADI’s award-winning film Lion Ark goes global

The award-winning documentary Lion Ark is to be distributed worldwide thanks to a deal the charity Animal Defenders International (ADI) brokered with ITV Studios Global Entertainment (ITVS GE).

The deal was signed ahead of Lion Ark’s theatrical release in cinemas across the UK in November.

Lion Ark follows a team from ADI as they rescued 25 lions from circuses in Bolivia after the country’s government banned wild animal acts. The government’s decision was the direct result of ADI’s two-year undercover investigation into circuses across South America.

The film shows the team journeying across a vast, hostile terrain to track down the circuses defying the new law in order to save the animals from a lifetime of cruelty. It reaches a joyous finale as 25 lions are airlifted in ADI’s Operation Lion Ark flight to freedom in Colorado.

“We wanted to make a film that would entertain and inspire, but also have audiences laughing out loud, cheering for the lions, and leave them smiling,” said Tim Phillips, the director of Lion Ark.

“Lion Ark has received a fantastic response at film festivals, with standing ovations and sell out screenings, so we are really excited to be taking it to a wider audience with ITV Studios Global Entertainment.”

“Lion Ark tells an incredible story of bravery, compassion, camaraderie and determination as a team of people fight an immense battle to save these beautiful creatures from horrific cruelty and abuse,” said Ronan Hand, Head of Factual and Entertainment Acquisitions for ITV Studios Global Entertainment.

“The film has already been garlanded with international awards and we expect it will attract a great deal of interest from buyers worldwide looking for the best nature programming at MIPCOM.”

Th UK screenings are listed below;

Tues 11 Nov, 6pm – Chapter, Cardiff
Sat 15 Nov, 11.40am – Glasgow Film Theatre
Mon 17 Nov, 8pm – Plaza Community Centre, Liverpool
Tues 25 Nov, 6.30pm – The Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford
Mon 1 Dec, 8pm – The Electric Theatre, Guildford
Tues 9 Dec, 8.30pm – Colchester Arts Centre
Mon 15 Dec, 8pm – Whirled, Brixton

Book tickets here

ADI are now currently rescuing lions from circuses in Peru. Read more HERE

Read a field guide to lions, which includes details on their habitat, diet and threats, HERE

For more information on Lion Ark click HERE

African lions are headed toward extinction and may be wiped out soon, according to an analysis from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service that on Monday proposed categorizing them as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act: here.

Lion film wins Emmy award


This video is called National Geographic’s Wild – Episode 3: Game Of Lions.

From Wildlife Extra:

Lion film wins Irons an Emmy

Actor Jeremy Irons‘ narration of a wildlife film has won him an Emmy. The winning film is Dereck and Beverly Joubert’s Game Of Lions, which follow the journey of young male lions in the African bush, from the birth to exile from a pride.

This was Irons’ seventh project with filmmakers and conservationists, Dereck and Beverly Joubert and the husband and wife’s eighth. Other collaborations between Irons and the Jouberts include: The Unlikely Leopard, Eye Of The Leopard, and The Last Lions.

“What makes our work with Jeremy resonate with authority and understanding is his relentless insistence on understanding each sentence, each word he delivers, says producer Beverly Joubert.

“Jeremy is a big cat expert as a result and that makes a difference, it makes what he reads believable. When you develop a relationship based on trust and professionalism it endures beyond that present piece of work and in many ways Jeremy has become the voice of our films.”

Read a field guide to lions HERE that includes details on their habitat, diet, threats, physiology and where to see them in the wild.

Okavango Delta in Botswana gets World Heritage status


This video about lions is called Okavango Swamp Cats.

From Wildlife Extra:

The Okavango Delta in Botswana has been listed by UNESCO as the 1,000th World Heritage Site.

This inland delta, which is situated in the northwest of the country and fed by the the Okavango River (that originates over 800 miles away in the highlands of Angola), is the largest of its type in the world and is comprised of permanent marshlands and seasonally flooded plains.

The River Okavango is at its fullest during the dry season, due to rainfall and floodwater from the Angolan Highlands, and overflows into these plains.

This attracts animals from miles around, making it one of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife.

It is home to populations of some of the most threatened large mammals in the world, including the cheetah, white and black rhinoceros, elephant, the wild dog and the lion. It harbours 24 species of globally-threatened birds.

“The Okavango Delta has long been considered one of the biggest gaps on the World Heritage list and IUCN is proud to have been able to provide support to this nomination,” says Julia Marton-Lefèvre, IUCN Director General.

“We congratulate Botswana’s authorities on their extraordinary commitment to make this historic listing a reality.”

“The Okavango Delta has been a conservation priority for more than 30 years and we are delighted that it has finally gained the prestigious status it deserves,” says Tim Badman, Director of IUCN’s World Heritage Programme. “Its ecological and biological importance as well as its exceptional natural beauty make it a prime example of what World Heritage stands for.”

UNESCO works to the identify, protect and preserve cultural and natural heritage around the world considered to be of outstanding value to humanity.

Read Chris McIntyre travel feature on the Delta HERE.

Save Indian lions


This video says about itself:

21 May 2014

Lions400 is the Zoological Society of London‘s campaign to secure the future of the majestic Asian lion, which clings to survival in only one isolated Indian forest.

These lions are on the brink, and we can’t let them disappear.

Find out more here.

From Wildlife Extra:

New campaign offers hope for Asian lion

Asian lions may be clinging to survival, with less than 500 left in the wild, but there is hope, say[s] The Zoological Society of London (ZSL). They have launched a campaign called Lions 400 to try and secure the future of the species, whose range is now limited one isolated Indian forest. Here the lions are easy prey for poachers, and just one forest fire or disease epidemic could wipe this ancient species out for ever.

Confined to such a small area, the lions are also at risk of wandering into neighbouring areas where the hazards include being killed by trains, vehicles or frightened villagers.

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Save African lions by building bomas


This video from Africa says about itself:

27 July 2008

A few of the Lion Guardians got together to help mend a boma that a hyena had been repeatedly attacking. Their hard work paid off and they managed to fix the boma so that the attacks stopped, and the community did not feel they had to kill the hyena.

From National Geographic yesterday:

In East Africa, livestock is the livelihood of many communities. When lions and other big cats kill livestock, people often kill the cats in retaliation—and the problem is growing worse. There are just over 30,000 lions left in the wild. The best way to prevent any more of these big cats from being killed is to prevent the conflict. And that’s where you come in.

Our Build a Boma campaign aims to stop these killings by building predator-proof boma fences to protect livestock from big cats. When you donate to Build a Boma, you’re funding the work of Big Cats Initiative grantees who are working with local communities to build these fences. It costs just $500 to build a boma and $25 to maintain one for a whole year. Any donation you can make will go a long way.

Want to learn more about the impacts of bomas? Watch a video that shows the benefits these fences have on communities.

Together we can decrease the killing of lions. Don’t forget to find out more about Build a Boma and how you can help save big cats.

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Lioness, wounded by buffalo, saved


This video from Kenya says about itself:

9 April 2014

Early on 4th April, a call was received from Governor’s Camp in the Maasai Mara about an injured lioness. She had a deep, open wound on her lower left flank, the result of an encounter with a buffalo.

The DSWT immediately launched its SkyVets Initiative; collecting a Kenya Wildlife Service Veterinarian and flying from Nairobi to the Mara. Once on the scene, the vet set about darting the lioness, whose wound was extensive.

In an operation that lasted 1 1/2 hrs, throughout which the rest of the pride were kept a safe distance, the vet thoroughly cleaned the wound before suturing it closed. Long lasting anti-biotic drugs were administered, as well as packing the wound with green clay, to speed the healing process. With that, Siena the lioness could rejoin the pride and her cubs.

Working together effectively and efficiently, the DSWT, KWS, Narok County Council and Governor’s Camp were able to help this lioness and with that, ensure the return of a mother to her cubs.

With Africa’s lions are under serious threat, with less than 35,000 remaining today, our ability to help this dominant pride member and her cubs is critically important.

Read the full account of the Siena’s treatment on our website, where you can also choose to support our SkyVets Initiative, here.

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