Ancient Egyptian pharaoh statues, new in museum


Statue of Pharaoh Ninetjer

Translated from the Dutch National Museum of Antiquities (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden) in Leiden today:

The National Museum of Antiquities has bought two ancient Egyptian pharaoh statues, including the oldest statue in the world with a pharaoh‘s name on it. It is a seated figure of pharaoh Ninetjer, one of the first kings of ancient Egypt (ca. 2785-2742 BC). The museum also bought a tomb statue of pharaoh Taharqa (690-664 BC.), one of the “black pharaohs” from Sudan.

Until the beginning of November 2014, you can see the pharaoh statues in a display in the entrance hall of the museum, next to the Egyptian temple. In 2016, they will get a prominent place in the by then renovated Egyptian department.

The Ninetjer statue is 13 centimeter high. The hieroglyph inscription on the statue says: ‘King of Upper and Lower Egypt, protected by the vulture and cobra, Ninetjer’. The cobra was the symbol of northern Egypt; the vulture of southern Egypt.

Pharaoh Taharqa statue

The Taharqa statue is 35 centimeter.

William Shakespeare sonnet on building


Shakespeare sonnet on building, 8 September 2014

There are poems on various buildings in Leiden city in the Netherlands. This one, in the inner city, is William Shakespeare‘s Sonnet XXX.

Shakespeare sonnet, 8 September 2014

These are cellphone photos.

Birds, butterflies and fungi


This video is about an Eurasian Nuthatch (Sitta europaea).

On Sunday 7 September 2014, to two pieces of woodland on the outskirts of Leiden city.

In a ditch near the Bos van Bosman, two coots and a moorhen swimming.

Sounds of nuthatch, great tit and great spotted woodpecker.

Two speckled wood butterflies flying.

A robin on the footpath.

A magpie on a lawn.

On another lawn, fungi: common ink cap and amethyst deceiver.

Later, in Rhijngeest woodland, porcelain fungi growing on a fallen branch.

Photograph a rose-ringed parakeet, get right to name it


Ring-necked parakeet A28 in Leiden with number

Translated from Sleutelstad radio in Leiden, the Netherlands:

Leiden parakeets get names and numbers

Leiden – Tuesday, July 22, 2014, 12:02

Chris de Waard

Already 85 wild parakeets in Leiden have recently received medals around their necks. Researcher Roland Jonker of the Center for Environmental Sciences of Leiden University wants the ‘Parakeets by numbers‘ project to map how the Leiden parakeet population evolves: “We would really like to know where the birds go, we are also curious about the size of the population and how long the Leiden parakeets live.”

The parakeets’ medals have unique letters and numbers, so the parakeets are easily recognizable. It is estimated that in and around Leiden approximately 850 ring-necked parakeets live. So by now about ten percent have clearly visible badges. Jonker hopes that from now on Leiden people will report back massively parakeets with medals by making pictures of them and posting these to the research project’s Facebook page. As a reward, people who rediscover a parakeet may name that bird.

The medals do not hinder the ring-necked parakeets, according to Jonker. Last year a few parakeets got ‘collars’ and when they were caught again later, it turned out they had not been harmed by them.

“Parakeets by numbers” is a joint project of the Center for Environmental Sciences (CML) of Leiden University and City Parrots in collaboration with the Bird Migration Station and Waarneming.nl.

This research project chose medals, not leg bands, for parakeets; as with the numbers, the birds do not have to be caught again to read letters and numbers, causing less stress for the birds.

Blackcap males sing differently to females than to other males


This video is about singing male blackcap.

This morning, Hans Slabbekoorn, who does research on bird songs at Leiden university, was interviewed on Dutch Vroege Vogels radio.

He told about research into songs by blackcap males. It turns out that, if a blackcap male sings to a female, there are more softer notes in the song. While, if he sings to another male, a potential rival, the songs have more louder notes.

Glass art and marine animals exhibition


This video says about itself:

Selections from the the film Proteus, a documentary concerning the life, work, and philosophy of Ernst Haeckel, a 19th century naturalist. The film tells of the man’s character and influences while using his detailed engravings of Radiolaria, single-celled marine organisms, to make animated progressions.

On Saturday 28 June 2014, a new exhibition will start in Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

The museum writes about it (translated):

Summer at Naturalis is dominated by marine animals. Meet the fascinating underwater world of Professor Ernst Haeckel. His brilliant scientific illustrations are the basis for cooperation between the National Glass Museum and Naturalis.

Until September 6, 2014

The exhibition Marine Animals brings nature, science and art together in an event with drawing activities, a special design contest and live glassblowing. The glass objects by artists and designers such as Andries Copier and Jan Taminiau are presented in addition to the natural history objects of Naturalis, surrounded by Haeckel’s drawings. Are you inspired as well? Draw a jellyfish, starfish or seashell and marvel at your lifelike drawing!

Tyrannosaurus rex fragments pieced together by museum visitors


This is a Dutch TV video about the Tyrannosaurus rex discovery in Montana, USA, in 2013.

Last year, an expedition from Naturalis museum in Leiden, the Netherlands, discovered a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton in Montana. If there will be enough money, this dinosaur will become part of the Naturalis collection.

Some of the bones of this tyrannosaur are very fragmented. Small pieces were found among lots of sand.

The museum wants to piece cervical vertebrae and cervical ribs of the dinosaur together.

To do that, they need many people.

The museum asks visitors to help.

On 7,8 and 9 June, paleontologist Anne Schulp will tell them about the discovery of this Tyrannosaurus rex. Then, visitors will try to fit bone fragments together.

Sessions will be at 11am, noon, 1pm, 2pm and 3pm; with a maximum of 24 people per session.

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