Morpho butterflies and young grebes at the botanical garden


This video says about itself:

Blue Morpho Butterfly – Found around 1700m amsl, Cordillera del Condor, South Ecuador.

I saw blue morpho butterflies today. I did not find them in Ecuador; but in the Victoria amazonica hothouse of the botanical garden. Pupae of various butterfly species were there as well.

Before we arrived there, a young great crested grebe swam under a bridge into a canal. A coot then drove it away.

In the botanical garden, near the astronomical observatory, a grey heron on the canal bank.

Another young great crested grebe swims past. Every now and then, it dives.

In the lawn there, the figures 425, formed by autumn crocus flowers; because the garden is 425 years old.

Festoon moth caterpillar, video


This video shows a festoon moth caterpillar in the Netherlands.

Christ Grootzwagers made the video.

Rare moth less rare in the Netherlands


This is a video from Japan about a Lithosia quadra caterpillar.

Translated from the Dutch Butterfly Foundation:

Thursday, October 23, 2014

The four-spotted footman is a moth with no permanent populations in the Netherlands. It is a rare migratory moth, entering the Netherlands from the south and possibly temporarily propagates. This year the moth is reported strikingly more than usually.

The four-spotted footman (Lithosia quadra) was from 2004 to 2013 reported only thirty times and thus a rare moth. In normal years, zero to four individuals were reported. In good years there were seven (2006) to nine (2012) four-spotted footmen. Only in 2014, over a hundred reports came in on Waarneming.nl and Telmee, from more than fifty different locations. The past week still saw a lot.

Lithosia quadra female

Rare flies in the Netherlands


This video is called Stomorhina lunata.

Translated from the Dutch entomologists of EIS Kenniscentrum Insecten, 20 October 2014:

This year so far has seen 48 Stomorhina lunata flies in the Netherlands, far more than in recent years. Most have been reported in the southern half of our country. In 1990 the first individual was seen in the Netherlands and in recent years there was a slight increase, but this year marks a huge leap. Stomorhina lunata originates in (semi-) deserts in southern Europe and Africa, where it is parasitic on eggs of locusts.

Good bee news from Amsterdam, but …


This video from England says about itself:

Miner bee. Dasypoda altercator characterised by its hairy yellow legs.

A solitary miner bee digs out its hole with its hairy I think back legs.

On 19 October 2014, Remco Daalder, Amsterdam city ecologist, was awarded the Jan Wolkers Prize. This prize is named after famous Dutch artist and author, including about natural history, Jan Wolkers. The Jan Wolkers Prize is for the best natural history book of the year in the Netherlands. Remco Daalder’s book is about swifts.

The prize was awarded in Naturalis museum in Leiden. Remco Daalder said there that things went well for bees in Amsterdam. ‘A threefold increase since ten years ago’.

A 21 September 2014 report from Amsterdam daily Het Parool says that this year, three bee species have been seen for the first time ever in Amsterdam: Heriades truncorum; Chelostoma rapunculi; and Osmia caerulescens.

Het Parool writes, interviewing Remco Daalder’s colleague, Arie Koster (translated):

My first observation is that things go very well with the wild bees in the city, I’m pretty excited. Bees which were rare fifteen years ago I find in various places now. Dasypoda altercator, Colletes daviesanus and red-footed leaf-cutter bees are now numerous. “According to Koster a field like this twenty years ago was unthinkable.

“Everything was mowed down and city gardens were sprayed with poison. In the eighties, wild bees in the city were dying. Mid-nineties, there was change and many municipalities began with ecological management. Apparently, the past fifteen years also made ​​a big impact. I notice the effect”.

However, meanwhile, in the Dutch countryside still lots of insecticides are used, killing many honeybees.