Sumatran tiger Internet game


This video is called On the Trail of the Tiger. It says about itself:

Award-winning photographer Steve Winter documents the disappearance of Asian Tigers in India, Sumatra, and Thailand.

From Wildlife Extra:

Zoological Society of London creates fun online game to highlight Sumatran tigers

The Zoological Society of London is inviting animal lovers to embrace their inner-beast and take on the persona of a fearsome predator in a brand new online challenge called Tiger Territory: The Game.

To celebrate the huge success of ZSL London Zoo’s flagship Sumatran tiger exhibit, Tiger Territory: The Game was launched to give budding conservationists and game-addicts alike the chance to experience life as a wild tiger deep in the forests of Indonesia.

With two modes to keep gamers on their toes, players get to grips with their surroundings in the Adventure stage, where they have to unlock 12 achievements. Highlighting the tigers’ behaviours and ZSL conservation techniques, including sniffing out prey and being ‘papped’ by a camera-trap, players have to be careful to evade poachers’ snares and palm oil plantations guarded by electric fences.

Once gamers have earned their stripes, they can embrace the Sumatran tigers’ remarkable hunting abilities in Arcade mode. In just 60 seconds their tigers have to hunt and eat as much as they can, from the common wild boar to the incredibly elusive tapir, in an attempt to boost their energy points.

Game-maker Filip Hnizdo said: “Tiger Territory: The Game is a chance for people to take on some of the challenges that wild Sumatran tigers face every day, from avoiding palm oil plantations to hunting for their speedy prey.

“We’ve worked with the conservation teams at ZSL London Zoo to replicate the tigers’ Indonesian home and behaviours as closely as possible – including the prey they hunt, rivers for them to swim in, and trees for them to hide under.

“We hope people will have great fun playing, and that they’ll also take away some awareness of the wild lives of Sumatran tigers and the very real threats that they’re facing – unfortunately for them, it’s not a game.”

With just 300 Sumatran tigers remaining in the wild, ZSL London Zoo coordinates the worldwide conservation breeding programme for the species, and is working in Indonesia to create wildlife corridors between fragmented forests, patrol tiger habitats, and carry out vital monitoring of the wild populations.

PLAY TIGER TERRITORY: THE GAME: here.

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Bowerbird bowers inspire artist


This video is called Life – The Vogelkop Bowerbird: Nature’s Great Seducer – BBC One.

From Audubon Magazine in the USA:

Incredibly Elaborate Homes of Bowerbirds Inspire New Art Exhibit

Janelle Iglesias reimagines the birds’ creations with a mix of locally sourced natural and recycled materials.

Todd Petty

Published: 03/26/2014

The male Vogelkop bowerbird goes to incredible lengths to attract a mate. With the creativity of an artist and the industry of an architect, he collects both natural and manmade materials found nearby to create an elaborate nest. He’ll incorporate everything from twigs and grasses to bottle caps and string into his masterpiece, all in the hopes of wooing a lady. Now, art is imitating this incredible behavior seen in life.

The remarkable bird inspired New York-based artist Janelle Iglesias’s new exhibit, In High Feather, at the University at Buffalo. The immersive, two-story bower in the style of the Vogelkop bowerbird, isn’t intended to be an exact replica of the bird’s home, Iglesias says, but rather an artistic reimagining.

Iglesias recently visited the Arfak Mountains in Indonesia in search of what she calls “the most advanced avian architecture on earth.” Her trip was made possible with the help of a Jerome Foundation travel and study grant.

Iglesias says that the kinship she felt for the Vogelkop bowerbird extends beyond an appreciation for their constructions. She and the birds use locally sourced material, often repurposing discarded items, she says. “I felt like I needed to make some decisions about my practice that would align my [environmental and political] philosophies,” she explains.

The bowerbird uses the space they create for seduction, luring females to visit and check out what they’ve created, in much the same way an artist seeks an audience. In fact, Iglesias invited the public to watch her build the exhibit, which opened February 27.

The two-story installation in the Lightwell Gallery will also include images and field recordings from her trip, as well as discarded items she picked up, including Christmas trees and cereal boxes. Just like the bowerbirds’ creations, her invention is a wonder to behold.

In High Feather runs until May 10.

This video says about itself:

Documentation of Janelle Iglesias’ installation at BCA Firehouse Gallery, “Draw Back the Bow (or Kill Your Darlings),” 2010. Video & music by Jin Kim.

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Leopard discovery in Java, Indonesia


This video is about leopards.

From Antara news agency in Indonesia:

Leopard detected in conservation forests in East Java

Tue, February 4 2014 23:33

Tulungagung, E Java – The East Java chapter of the Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) has detected Javanese leopards (Panthera pardus melas) in four conservation forests in the region, stated its head, Hartoyo.

He released the statement here on Tuesday, in response to a declaration on saving the endangered Javanese leopard issued at a Javanese leopard conservation conference in Bogor, West Java, on January 29-30, 2014.

“So far, we have come to know about it, based on the reports indicating the existence of the wild animal and also from some eye witnesses,” he remarked during a telephonic conversation, when asked to give confirmation about the existence of the Javanese leopard.

He admitted that the existence of the Javanese leopard was not properly documented as it is not included as species whose protection must be prioritized based on the ministerial regulation.

The Javanese bull (Bos javanicus), Javanese eagle (Nisaetus bartelsi), and cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) have been identified by the ministry as three rare species and their monitoring has been prioritized.

The Javanese leopard is not included in the BKSDAs monitoring priority list as it is not included in the list of protected animals, although its existence in the forests is almost extinct.

“We are awaiting a legal decision to declare the Javanese leopard as a protected animal before we can make any protection plans,” he emphasized.

He explained that the existence of the big cat has been threatened by the loss of habitat due to deforestation as well as conflict with humans and diseases.

In the past five years, the Javanese leopard has been spotted in the Ijen (Bondowoso), Sempu (Malang), Sigoho, and Picis (Ponorogo) forests, he claimed.

However, their existence had yet to be confirmed based on the research and scientific monitoring data, he added.

“Now, confirmation of its existence is based on an ocular analysis and general information obtained from the witnesses. There has been no direct contact between the BKSDA officials and the animal, except in Ijen, some time ago,” he stated.

Leopard observer Hendra Gunawan pointed out that the Javanese leopard is the only big cat that still exists in Java after the Javanese tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica) was declared extinct in the 1980s.

“Thus, unless serious efforts are made to protect the leopard, the fate of this big cat will also follow suit,” he remarked at the conference in Bogor.

The Javanese leopard has been categorized as critically endangered species and put in the list of the International Union for Conservation of Nature under the category Appendix I in CITES.

No exact data is available on the exact numbers of the Javanese leopard existing in the forests of Java.

“Since mapping was conducted four years ago, the animal was mostly found in Halimun-Salak or Pangrango Mountain (West Java),” Hendra reported.

Reporting by Slamet Agus Sudarmojo

February 2014: Two men have been arrested in Malaysia by wildlife authorities following the discovery of a leopard carcass and a mouse deer at a bus stop near the town of Karak, in the state of Pahang, on the east coast of the country. Markings on the leopard’s foreleg indicate that a snare was used, a practice which is widespread among poachers in South-East Asia: here.

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