Rare mushroom found in the Netherlands


This video is called Common Inkcap Mushroom.

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society:

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

Preceded by much rain, last week at different places in North Holland province common inkcap fungi appeared. Also, in a recreation area north of Alkmaar they were found. Nothing special you might say, because common inkcap fungi are common. By chance, in this area not only common inkcap fungi occured, but also some specimens of the rare Coprinopsis romagnesiana inkcap fungus were discovered.

Rare mushroom discovery on Dutch cemetery


This video is about fungi in the Netherlands.

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society on Wednesday, on August 6th, 2014:

On cemetery Heiderust to Rheden the very rare blackening chanterelle has been discovered. For this species, it is the second discovery ever in the Netherlands. The blackening chanterelle is not only on the Dutch Red List, but also on the European list of threatened fungi, so a very special find. In cemeteries, because of specific management, quite often special mushrooms are discovered.

New mushroom species discovery in the Netherlands


Leucopaxillus paradoxus

The Dutch Mycological Society reports that on 9 November 2013 a fungus was found in the sand dunes near IJmuiden which was new for the Netherlands.

It belonged to the Leucopaxillus genus, but it was difficult to find out which species. Very probably, it is Leucopaxillus paradoxus var. paradoxus, but more research is still needed.

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New fungi discoveries in the Netherlands


This video says about itself:

A short description of Gyromitra esculenta, another false morel. This mushroom is still being eaten by some people who think it’s safe. It’s not!

The Dutch Mycological Society reports about research in the Horsterwold nature reserve in Flevoland province this spring.

Then, they found the rare mushroom species Gyromitra esculenta. It was the first time ever for Flevoland.

They also found Caloscypha fulgens; a fungus species, which, before this, had been known only from three spots in the Netherlands. Also a first for the province.

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Save British botanical gardens scientific work


This video is about Kew Gardens in London, England.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Campaign and petitions launched to save botanical garden jobs

Saturday 19th April 2014

London’s Kew and Wakehurst Place in Sussex are threatened by government cuts

A national campaign has been launched to save vital conservation and scientific work at two botanical gardens where 120 jobs are under threat.

General union GMB said on Thursday that jobs are under threat at Kew in London and Wakehurst Place in Sussex due to government cuts.

Kew Gardens is a world leader in its field with over 250 years experience, but has announced a £5 million deficit.

The campaign includes a petition and early day motion in Parliament.

Naturalist Sir David Attenborough is backing the campaign.

GMB regional officer Paul Grafton said “The aim is to save globally important conservation and science under threat.

“Never before has Kew faced such a significant threat to its future. It now needs public support to ensure its globally-important plant and fungal collections can continue to be used to support plant and fungal science and conservation around the world.”

The petition can be found here.

This video is called WAKEHURST PLACE, MANSION & GARDENS, WEST SUSSEX, UK.

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Fungi, godwits and avocets


Meeslouwer lake, 23 February 2014

This photo shows the Meeslouwer lake, just north of Starrevaart nature reserve.

Today, 23 January 2014, to Starrevaart. In the pond next to the parking lot, gadwall ducks swimming.

A bit further, in the Meeslouwer lake: grey lag geese; coots; great cormorants sitting on poles.

Canada geese. Two little grebes. Tufted ducks.

Then, to the Starrevaart lake. Shelducks. A buzzard flying. Pheasants walking.

In woodland, fungi; the winter weather so far is mild. Scurvy twiglet mushrooms.

Witches' butter, 23 February 2014

On a fallen tree, witches’ butter.

A bit further, Coprinellus micaceus fungi. And Coprinus domesticus fungi. And Bjerkandera adusta.

Lesser celandine already flowering along a ditch, though spring still has to begin officially.

In the Starrevaart lake, scores of common pochards swimming. Behind them, over a thousand wigeons.

On the small island near the hide: many oystercatchers, scores of northern lapwings; and a few black-tailed godwits, just back from spring migration.

Oystercatchers and avocets flying away, Starrevaart, 23 February 2014

Every now and then, something scares the birds on the islet, and they fly away. On the photo, oystercatchers fly with two avocets, while wigeons swim.

Oystercatchers and godwits, Starrevaart, 23 February 2014

Most of the birds return to the island, if they think it was false alarm. On the photo oystercatchers, northern lapwings, and two black-tailed godwits; with a wigeon swimming in front of them.

Lapwings and godwits, 23 February 2014

Two male and one female goldeneyes swimming near the other side of the lake.

Shoveler, 23 February 2014

A male shoveler duck swims behind the islet.

Northern lapwing, 23 February 2014

A northern lapwing on top of a pole, with a row of wigeons underneath.

Northern lapwing, Starrevaart, 23 February 2014

Lapwings and wigeons gather as well on the rocks just east of the islet.

Lapwings and wigeons, 23 February 2014

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