Rare mushroom in the Netherlands for first time


Crepidotus cinnabarinus between Crepidotus mollis fungi, photo by  Ieko Staal)

This photo shows the rare reddish mushroom Crepidotus cinnabarinus between not so rare white Crepidotus mollis fungi; photo by Ieko Staal.

The Dutch mycological society reports today about Crepidotus cinnabarinus, a fungus which is rare all over Europe and North America.

That species had never been seen in the Netherlands. Until 28 August 2014, in the Hulkesteinse bos woodland in Flevoland province. Six days, later on 3 September, it was found in Zeeland province as well.

Fungi, birds and wasps of Meijendel


Big rose bedeguar gall, 6 September 2014

This is a photo of a rose bedeguar gall on a dog rose leaf in the Kikkervalleien area of Meijendel nature reserve, on 6 September 2014.

This blog has already reported about amphibians there on that day. Now, about fungi, birds and the small wasps, only three millimetre for males, four for females, Diplolepis rosae, which cause these galls.

Soon after our arrival at Meijendel, great spotted woodpecker sound.

Along the cycle track, Lactarius controversus fungi.

Next, Inocybe serotina mushrooms.

Then, brown roll-rim.

And stinking dapperling.

Two common pochard ducks swimming in a lake.

In another lake, tufted ducks, mallards and coots.

Lepiota alba fungi.

Nine gray lag geese flying overhead.

We arrived at the Kikkervalleien area of Meijendel, usually closed to the public.

Then, we saw the dog rose plant of the first photo of this blog post.

Small rose bedeguar gall, 6 September 2014

That plant had more galls than the one on the first photo; like the one on this photo, usually smaller ones. If a small Diplolepis rosae wasp lays an egg on a leaf, then the plant reacts by building a gall around the egg, protecting it. This wasp species was named originally by Linnaeus.

Winter stalkball fungi on the footpath.

A great cormorant flying overhead.

Scotch bonnet mushrooms.

Many rabbit droppings.

Witch's hat, 6 September 2014

A beautiful red mushroom: a witch’s hat.

Two carrion crows.

Then, five greenshanks on migration, flying overhead.

At the next lake, two mute swans. First on the bank, then swimming.

Hygrocybe sp., 6 September 2014

Another beautiful red mushroom. A witch’s hat? Or a vermilion waxcap? This genus, Hygrocybe, is not easy.

We find another gall: a Pontania collactanea wasp caused this one.

Three great egrets flying.

Hygrocybe sp., Kikkervalleien, 6 September 2014

More beautiful Hygrocybe fungi. Still difficult to say which species.

Hygrocybe sp., in Kikkervalleien, 6 September 2014

As we leave the Kikkervalleien for other parts of Meijendel, other mushrooms: death caps.

Stay tuned for the Kikkervalleien plants on this blog!

Birds, butterflies and fungi


This video is about an Eurasian Nuthatch (Sitta europaea).

On Sunday 7 September 2014, to two pieces of woodland on the outskirts of Leiden city.

In a ditch near the Bos van Bosman, two coots and a moorhen swimming.

Sounds of nuthatch, great tit and great spotted woodpecker.

Two speckled wood butterflies flying.

A robin on the footpath.

A magpie on a lawn.

On another lawn, fungi: common ink cap and amethyst deceiver.

Later, in Rhijngeest woodland, porcelain fungi growing on a fallen branch.

Rare mushroom discovery in the Netherlands


Leucoagaricus meleagris, photo by Peter Comber

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society:

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

In the vicinity of Hengelo town the Leucoagaricus meleagris mushroom was found a few weeks ago. This very rare heat-loving species grew there on rotting hay. Leucoagaricus meleagris benefits possibly from the warmer summers and recent heavy downpours. As the number of reports from our country increased slightly in recent years.

Rare mushroom discovery in the Netherlands


This video from France is called Chamaemyces fracidus. English Text.

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society on Wednesday, August 27th, 2014:

In the dunes of Schoorl is the very rare Chamaemyces fracidus mushroom has been found. The species still lives only at six places in the Netherlands. The mushroom was in the verge of a seashell cycle track. The dunes of Schoorl have a low lime content, but thanks to the calcareous seashell path it can grow here.

Sea eagle, ospreys, ruddy shelducks and fungi


Purple heron, 23 August 2013

23 August 2014 in Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve in the Netherlands. There was not only bird ringing there then. Also this wooden larger than life purple heron. Pictured by a cellphone camera, like the other photos of this blog post.

That heron was part of a group of other wood herons (bittern; grey heron; great egret; little egret) at the Dutch Bird Fair.

However, I promised to tell you what happened after the bird ringing.

Two Egyptian geese swimming.

Many barn swallows flying. Probably preparing to migrate to Africa.

Two ospreys circling in the air. Probably preparing to migrate to Africa as well.

Six white-fronted geese swimming. A bit strange to see them now in August, as they usually arrive from the Arctic in September.

Sulphur polypore, 23 August 2013

We pass a tree, on which sulphur polypore fungi grow.

We arrive at the hide called De Zeearend, called after the sea eagle.

And indeed, in the distance sits a sea eagle.

Closer to the hide, many grey lag and barnacle geese.

Four spoonbills. A great egret.

A group of ruddy shelducks cleaning their feathers on a meadow.

Near hide De Zeearend, 23 August 2013

The weather changes from one moment to the next one. Downpours. Sun. Sometimes, both at once, though we don’t see a rainbow.