Sea eagle nest webcam online


This is a video about a young sea eagle in a nest in the Oostvaardersplassen in the Netherlands last year.

Today, a webcam of a white-tailed eagle nest in the Netherlands went online.

See here.

The sea eagles had found an abandoned buzzard nest and expanded it to fit their size.

Young sea eagles in the Netherlands: here.

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Five bald eagle webcams on the Internet


This video is called Bald Eagle catches salmon.

From National Geographic:

Five Bald Eagle Cams to Watch Now

Watch as adults defend eggs, eaglets hatch, and young eagles take first flights.

By Brad Scriber

March 6, 2014

Forty years ago the bald eagle was in danger of extinction throughout North America, but today the iconic U.S. emblem is an environmental success story. In addition, a handful of these rebounding raptors have become Internet celebrities, appearing on live streaming webcams across the country that allow anyone an up-close look into their giant nests.

The 2014 nesting season is at its peak, so now is the perfect time to watch eaglets hatch in the more northern regions and to see young eagles in the south test their wings on their first flights.

The adult birds often return to the same nests year after year, and lay up to three eggs, which hatch after about five weeks. Adults care for the growing eaglets for several months until the young take their first flight. Fledglings stay in or near the nest for an additional month or so.

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American bald eagle recovered


This video from the USA is called Eagle eating fish; Willamette River; Jennings Lodge, Oregon 8/9/13.

From OregonLive.com in the USA:

Rehabilitated bald eagle spotted alive and well along Willamette River four years after release

By Justin Runquist

January 31, 2014 at 4:37 PM

A bald eagle that was found injured in Lake Oswego has recently been spotted along the Willamette River alive and well nearly four years after being released into the wild.

Wildlife photographer Steve Berliner recently moved to the Milwaukie area, where he began seeing the eagle – a male estimated to be about 9 or 10 years old – over the summer flying by with a female companion and young offspring of their own. Berliner believes the birds have settled on nearby Elk Rock Island.

“On average, we probably see them fly by once a week,” he said. “Its appearances are very sporadic, and that’s why I think it’s from further up the river.”

Berliner managed to get clear enough photos to reveal the identification number on the bird’s tag. He’s also captured videos of the bird, one [above] showing it perched on a tree branch and tearing apart a fish.

Berliner later confirmed it was the right eagle with the Audubon Society of Portland, which nursed the bird back to health before releasing it in April 2010.

Deb Sheaffer, who manages the organization’s Wildlife Care Center, said the eagle suffered a number of puncture wounds to one of its knees in March 2010, most likely in a territorial fight with another eagle. Neighbors were alarmed to hear the screaming bird outside their homes.

“We were able to see there was a little fracture in there,” Sheaffer said. “Probably the large talon from the other bird went right into the knee.”

Previously injured birds are hardly ever spotted again once they are released, she said.

“This is what we do all the time; we do rehabilitation on these birds and release them but we hardly know what happens to them,” she said. “We rarely get that information, because very few birds are banded.”

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Recovered sea eagle flies to Lauwersmeer


This Dutch video is about setting free a young sea eagle, after it had recovered in Zundert bird asylum from poisoining.

Regional TV RTV Noord in the Netherlands reports that a white-tailed eagle was photographed in Lauwersmeer nature reserve.

The rings on the photo proved that this was the young sea eagle which had been poisoned last autumn. It recovered in a bird asylum in Zundert. After recovery, it was freed last October in Biesbosch nature reserve. The bird had not been seen since.

Apparently, it flew all the way from the southern Netherlands to the Lauwersmeer in the north. There are now five sea eagles in the Lauwersmeer reserve.

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Golden eagle in the snow, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Golden Eagle Flying Through Snow

27 Nov 2013

A female golden eagle flies from her rocky perch as an early season snowfall blankets Wyoming’s sagebrush steppe.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA writes about this:

A Quiet Moment in the Snow—With a Very Large Eagle

Our Multimedia program is working on a documentary about the great sagebrush ecosystems of the American West. Tying together the many strands of that story is one of the region’s top predators, the Golden Eagle. On a filming expedition last fall, as a morning snowstorm descended on the gray-green plains of Wyoming, we captured a brief moment with one of these majestic predators.

January 2014: Tomorrow, wildlife cameraman and natural history presenter, Gordon Buchanan will talk to the Holyrood Petitions Committee about getting the golden eagle adopted as Scotland’s national bird: here.

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Bald eagles in the USA, where to see them


This video is called American Bald Eagle.

From Discovery News in the USA:

Endangered Species

Bald Eagle Spotting: Top Spots

Dec 27, 2013 12:43 PM ET // by Tim Wall

Forty years ago, the Endangered Species Act was signed into law by President Richard Nixon. The act’s authors sought to protect animals, plants and other wildlife from extinction caused by “economic growth and development untempered by adequate concern and conservation,” in the words of the Act.

One symbol of the United States, the bald eagle, provides an example of how a change to the economy saved an icon of North America.

DDT, or dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, weakened eagle and other bird egg shells so much that the eggs would collapse under the mother. The chemical was introduced in the 1940s and already had decimated bird populations by the early 1960s.

NEWS: Bald Eagle Nestlings Contaminated by Chemicals

In 1972, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency banned the pesticide. The removal of DDT from the market allowed eagle eggs to regain their strength, and the raptors began a recovery.

Bald eagles soared off of the Endangered Species List in 2007. Although off the list, the birds are still protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Lacey Act, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

LIST: Animals Back From the Brink

An eagle-watching trip could be a thrilling way to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act and the success of bald eagles.

From coast to coast, National Wildlife Refuges offer winter-long opportunities to observe the raptors, along with special events.

The USFWS presents a cross-country list of these eagle adventures in Maryland, Virginia, Illinois, Tennessee, Missouri, Oklahoma, Utah, California, Oregon and Washington. Here are a few highlights:

Maryland: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Eagle Festival March 15, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The festival is a free way to see more than 200 eagles overwintering in the refuge, the largest population on the East Coast, north of Florida.

Illinois: Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Eagle Watch Jan. 18-19, 25-26 at  8 a.m., 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations are required for this guided van trip to see eagle nests.

Missouri: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Open all winter. A 1.5-mile trail offers views of hundreds of eagles.

Oregon: Winter Wings Festival in Klamath Falls Feb. 13-16. Sessions on bald eagles and other raptors are featured events at this avian extravaganza.

The Endangered Species Act has prevented the extinction of 99% of the more than 2,140 species it currently protects: here.

West Nile Virus Behind Utah Bald Eagle Deaths: here.

Dutch national park Oostvaardersplassen extended


This video is about a sea eagle nest and other wildlife in Oostvaardersplassen national park.

Soon this month, the wildlife of Oostvaardersplassen national park in the Netherlands will get extra space.

The high fences separating Oostvaardersplassen from the Kotterbos woodland will be removed. First, they will be replaced with low fences, enabling red deer to use the wildlife passage to the other side of the railway. Later, all fences will be removed, enabling konik horses and Heck cattle to go to the Kotterbos as well.

In that forest, they will have more protection if winter will get cold.

The Kotterbos was planned as part of a big wildlife corridor, enabling animals to move all the way from the Oostvaardersplassen to the Veluwe region. However, anti-conservation Dutch government policies stopped that plan. Wardens hope that plans for the big wildlife corridor will revive.

The Oostvaardersplassen is the subject of the succesful new Dutch wildlife film De Nieuwe Wildernis.

Golden eagle, Scotland’s favourite animal


This video from the USA says about itself:

21 Apr 2011

The first of a three segment video revealing the life of nesting Golden Eagles located within Whychus Canyon near Sisters, Oregon. The camera is attached to a telescope and is position about a quarter of a mile from the nest. The eagles are completely unaware of the camera. The nest is on a sheer cliff within a reserve managed by Wolftree, a non-profit, science education organization.

And here is segment #2.

And here is segment #3.

From Scottish Natural Heritage, Tuesday 5th November 2013:

Golden Eagle soars high as Scotland‘s number one

The Golden Eagle has overwhelmingly topped the vote in a campaign to find the Scotland’s favourite wild animal. The impressive bird of prey was competing against the Red Deer, Red Squirrel, Harbour Seal and Otter. Thousands of votes were recorded online following the campaign launch in spring this year and voting closed on 31st October. With almost 40 per cent of the vote, the eagle was well ahead of its counterparts. The next closest was the Red Squirrel with 20 per cent, then the Red Deer and the Otter, with the Harbour Seal in last place.

The campaign was run jointly by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) and VisitScotland as part of the Year of Natural Scotland 2013 celebrations. Environment and Climate Change Minister and PAW Scotland Chairman Paul Wheelhouse said: “While we can be enormously proud of all our native wildlife, it is fitting that the magnificent Golden Eagle has topped this poll of Scotland’s ‘Big 5′ species.”

The Golden Eagle has overwhelmingly topped the vote in a campaign to find the Scotland’s favourite wild animal. The impressive bird of prey was competing against the Red Deer, Red Squirrel, Harbour Seal and Otter. Thousands of votes were recorded online following the campaign launch in spring this year and voting closed on 31st October. With almost 40 per cent of the vote, the eagle was well ahead of its counterparts. The next closest was the Red Squirrel with 20 per cent, then the Red Deer and the Otter, with the Harbour Seal in last place.

The campaign was run jointly by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) and VisitScotland as part of the Year of Natural Scotland 2013 celebrations. Environment and Climate Change Minister and PAW Scotland Chairman Paul Wheelhouse said: “While we can be enormously proud of all our native wildlife, it is fitting that the magnificent Golden Eagle has topped this poll of Scotland’s ‘Big 5′ species.”

“At present Scotland is home to all of the UK’s breeding pairs of these eagles, and the species has done well to recover after almost being wiped out in the last two centuries. However, recent incidents have shown that the [species] is still threatened by illegal persecution in some areas. We have a responsibility to protect this wonderful bird so that future generations can continue to enjoy its presence in our skies.”

Scotland’s Big 5 were selected because they were all high-profile species, widely associated with Scotland, and with a broad geographical spread. Ian Jardine, SNH chief executive said: “The response to the campaign has been brilliant. Thousands of people have voted for their favourite from Scotland’s Big 5 list. There have been several alternative lists put forward for seabirds, game animals, trees and plants, and support for rarer species like the Pine Marten and Wildcat. It has got people thinking about and talking about wildlife, and showing how much affection and pride people have, not just for the five species on the list, but for Scottish wildlife generally.”

Through the partnership with SNH, VisitScotland promoted the campaign to millions of potential visitors and where best to see them in their natural environments. This saw all of Scotland’s Big 5 championed through a series of billboard advertisements in Manchester, Liverpool, Newcastle, Glasgow and Edinburgh. Alongside this, TV personality Neil Oliver lent his voice to an extensive radio campaign, with written press and online content specially developed throughout the year. Mike Cantlay, Chairman of VisitScotland, added: “We’ve been absolutely delighted with the response that Scotland’s Big 5 campaign has received, and it has been a cornerstone of our celebrations for the Year of Natural Scotland 2013. One of the key pillars of the year was to get as many people here at home out seeing parts of Scotland that they may not have been to before, and the Big 5 campaign has given us a fantastic opportunity to promote even the most remote areas of our wonderful country.”

April 2014: Two golden eagles have been tagged in a new satellite project run by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) so there can be greater understanding about the birds’ behaviour: here.

Good Indian Amur falcon news, bad Maltese eagle news


This video is called Amur falcon‘s epic journey.

From Wildlife Extra:

Amur falcon massacre one year on – No birds killed so far!

Three weeks into the migration – Amur falcons hunted: Zero

October 2013. One year ago, more than 100,000 Amur falcons were killed in Nagaland in north-east India where they stop over on migration from southern Africa to Mongolia and eastern China. They make this journey, an extraordinary round-trip of some 14,000 miles every year, but it recently became apparent that as many as 100,000 falcons (some estimate even more) were being killed on their migration when they reached Nagaland. Witnesses claimed that tens of thousands of Amur falcons were being trapped and slaughtered every day during their migration.

So far in 2013, more than 300,000 Amur Falcons have arrived in Nagaland on migration. However, thanks to a campaign organised by the Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), squads of ex-hunters and youths from three villages in the area have been patrolling the falcon roosting areas day and night to ensure they are safe.

Remarkably, the squads have recorded that not a single bird has been killed.

WTI and Natural Nagas started the project to prevent the slaughter of Amur falcons earlier this year, with support from CAF-India in collaboration with Nagaland Forest Department. The Village Council Members of three villages pledged that their respective villages would [stop to] hunt or kill falcons and made it a punishable offence. This was preceded and followed by a number of awareness campaigns and meetings with the villagers.

This video from 2012 is called Thousands of Amur falcon birds poached in Nagaland. I hope that the horrible images of this video will now be history forever.

Unfortunately, not all bird news is as good as this item from India.

This video from Malta says about itself:

12 confirmed shot in Maltese eagle massacre

Thursday 24th October- This morning the confirmed body count of eagles shot down by hunters in Malta and Gozo reached 12, after two more of these rare and highly protected birds of prey were killed in front of watching BirdLife Malta volunteers.

BirdLife Malta’s Conservation Manager, Nicholas Barbara, described the events as a tragic wake-up call:

“We haven’t seen the wanton slaughter of this many protected birds by this many hunters in Malta for a long time. It is difficult to see this as anything other than a complete catastrophe and the descriptions of the scale of killing we have seen in the last 24 hours as an “isolated incident” and the scenario that only a few rogue bad apples are responsible for killing protected birds is not consistent with reality.”

“We can only hope that these events serve as a serious wake-up call to the government that the current enforcement of hunting is not doing the job and things need to change for the situation to improve.”

Read the full story here.

Young eagle flies again after recovery


This video is about freeing a young white-tailed eagle after its reconvalescence in the Netherlands. The bird now has a colour ring to identify it.

The young sea-eagle, found ill near Hank in the Netherlands, has been set free again after weeks of convalescence.