Wolves back in Denmark after 200 years


This video is called Living with Wolves.

From Wildlife Extra:

Wolves back in Denmark after 200 year absence

Following the discovery of a dead male wolf in the northernmost part of Denmark in 2012 research has been undertaken into the species by the country’s Natural History Museum, Aarhus and Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Kalø.

As a result of their findings they have recently published a map showing all documented wolf information to date during 2014. The documentation consists of photos from wildlife camera traps and DNA analyses of saliva samples from dead wildlife, sheep and calves, and samples from presumed wolf scats.

The maps reveal that wolves have been sighted in most parts of the peninsula of Jutland. Most of the positive wolf DNA samples were collected in the central and western Jutland, in areas with widespread forests and heathland, but wolves were also detected in more agricultural areas. …

Until now, 12 individual wolves have been identified through DNA analysis. Two of these can be traced back to a German wolf pack, some 700 km away, and two others are closely related to a Polish pack at least 800 km away. Most individuals are only found once, however one individual has been detected in eight locations during the last 18 months.

“Interestingly, the 12 individual wolves are all males and there is no proof of females and cubs,” said Thomas Secher Jense of the Natural History Museum.

“However, there have been several undocumented observations, including wolf howls suggesting that they might be found in Denmark.

Male wolves are known to roam large areas looking for females, whereas females generally do not disperse that far. The closest known wolf pack in the vicinity of the Danish border is in the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, some 200 km away.“

Jailed Bahraini human rights activist in coma


Maryam and Abdulhadi al-Khawaja. Photo: Maryam al-Khawaja/Polfoto

From The Local in Denmark:

Jailed Danish activist in coma in Bahrain

29 Aug 2014 08:23 GMT+02:00

Less than a week into his new hunger strike, Abdulhadi al-Khawaja has reportedly fallen into a coma. The family plans to appeal to Denmark for help.

Abdulhadi al-Khawaja, the jailed Danish-Bahraini activist who began a new hunger strike on Monday, is in a coma according to a report from Politiken.

An activist with Al-Khawaja’s Bahrain Center for Human Rights said that the dual Danish and Bahraini citizen fell ill on Thursday and was taken to the prison hospital, where he was reported to be in a coma.

Al-Khawaja’s family announced on Monday that he would begin a new hunger strike, refusing all food and drink with the exception of water. An earlier hunger strike by the activist lasted 110 days and led to a massive, but unsuccessful, diplomatic effort by Denmark to get him either released or transferred.

Al-Khawaja, a dual citizen of Denmark and Bahrain, has been imprisoned in Bahrain prison since 2011, serving a life sentence for demonstrating against the government and organising protests during the Arab Spring. Along with eight others, he was convicted on charges of terrorism and attempting to overthrow the government. While jailed in Bahrain, al-Khawaja has been subjected to torture, violence and sexual abuse. In January 2013, al-Khawaja lost the final legal appeal against his life sentence.

Al-Khawaja’s daughter Maryam wrote on Twitter that the activist’s other daughter Zainab was detained by Bahraini police on Thursday when she tried to visit their father in prison. Zainab is seven months pregnant. Both of Al-Khawaja’s daughters are also Danish citizens.

According to Politiken, the family will appeal to the Danish Foreign Ministry for help. A doctor has told the family that al-Khawaja’s hunger strike may have already damaged his internal organs.

Message From Human Rights Defender Maryam al-Khawaja: here.

Co-Director of the Gulf Centre for Human Rights and prominent human rights defender Maryam Al-Khawaja was detained at Bahrain International Airport this morning. On her arrival at approximately 1:00am Bahrain time, Maryam was met by security officials who informed her that she was not welcome in Bahrain. They also informed Maryam that her Bahraini nationality had been revoked: here.

Bahrain must immediately and unconditionally release leading human rights defender Maryam Al-Khawaja, who was arrested earlier today in connection with her work to promote human rights and accountability in the country. See more here.

Bahrain: 600 Detainees On Hunger Strike To Stop Torture In Prison: here.

Wolves back in Denmark


This video from 2013 is called Danish wolf is back.

From Wildlife Extra:

First wolf family heard in Denmark for 200 years

April 2014: It is suspected by a group of wolf enthusiasts in Denmark that the country probably has its first resident wolf family for over 200 years, reports Rewilding Europe. Ulvetracking Danmark has gone to great lengths to register the sounds of the Danish wolves, recorded in Jutland in January. Holly Root-Gutteridge, an English wolf expert and PhD student at Nottingham Trent University, believes that these howls stem from an entire wolf family. This means that these could be the first wolf pups born in the wild of Denmark for well since the early 19th century.

“This is the biggest fauna sensation we have had for many years,” said Mogens Trolle, zoologist in the Nature Science Museum at the University of Copenhagen.

“There’s at least two adults there,” said Root-Gutteridge. “One with a nice deep howl, which is almost a baseline to the chorus, is probably the male and father of the pups, as it’s rare to have unrelated males in the same pack. There are possibly three adults, but I need more analysis of the recording to be sure. There are also pups on there. Considering the recording was made in January, they might be wolves that are eight to 10 months of age, with not quite fully developed howls.”

Listen to the two recordings in Jutland by clicking this link and scrolling down.

That possibility is strengthened by the fact that two different sets of wolf tracks were found on 30 January 2013 in the same area in Jutland where the howls were recorded. Once the world’s most widely distributed mammal, the grey wolf declined across Europe as a result of relentless persecution over centuries. Ultimately, by the 1970s, it was confined to only a few areas in the south and the northeast of the continent. However, with increasing public acceptance and legal protection, combined with an increase in wild ungulate numbers, the wolf has been able to begin to regain more and more of its former territory.

Petitioning The Danish Government. The Danish Government: Please protect Danish Wolves: here.

Wolves near the Dutch-German border: here.

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British army animal abuse in Denmark


This video is called Pigs Strung Up And SHOT To Train British Army Medics In Treating Gunshot Wounds.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain, with photos there:

EXCLUSIVE: Pigs strung up and SHOT to train British Army medics in treating gunshot wounds

Feb 18, 2014 00:00

By Chris Hughes, Andy Lines

Military surgeons are being sent to Denmark for the controversial training on live animals – even though the practice is illegal in the UK

Pigs are being shot so British Army medics can learn to treat battle wounds.

Military surgeons are sent to Denmark for the controversial training on live animals – even though the practice is illegal in the UK.

Animal rights group PETA has slammed the “cruel” practice.

A live pig dangles from a wooden frame as a soldier shoots it to inflict horrific injuries.

Military medics then operate on the animal’s traumatic gunshot wounds while it is still breathing.

The shocking photos taken in Denmark have put the country at the centre of another animal cruelty row after the controversial killing of a giraffe at Copenhagen Zoo.

Campaigners who are disgusted by the pig shootings are demanding an end to the brutal military training courses that are nicknamed Operation Danish Bacon.

This kind of training is banned in Britain – yet our Army medics are sent to Denmark to take part.

Mimi Bekhechi, associate director of animal rights group PETA UK, said: “The overwhelming majority of the UK’s Nato allies do not shoot, stab or dismember animals for their military training exercises.

“The Ministry of Defence’s decision to ship out members of the armed forces for these deadly and cruel exercises in Denmark – which would be illegal if conducted in the UK – is impossible to justify medically, ethically or educationally.”

The pigs are strung up then blasted with an AK-47 rifle or a 9mm handgun.

To give them experience of working on gun wounds, medics then operate on the animals. Even if the surgery is a success, the pigs are later killed.

The British Army sends surgeons to Jaegerspris Kaserne in Denmark twice a year to take part in the exercises.

During the training the pigs are “subjected to bullet and blast wounds”, the UK Government has confirmed. PETA has appealed to the Danish Minister of Defence to stop the country’s animal-based trauma training exercises.

Campaigners argue that hi-tech human simulators should be used instead, adding that they are more realistic than using live animals.

A PETA spokesman said: “Eighty per cent of Nato allies have already ended the cruel use of animals in archaic military medical training exercises. …

PETA has also filed a complaint with the European Commission against Denmark over the training courses.

An EU directive, as well as Denmark’s Animal Welfare Act, require that non-animal methods should be used to train the military whenever available.

A former US military medical worker – who is now with PETA – insisted that compared to operating on animals that have been stabbed or shot, the
lifelike human simulators are a far superior way of preparing doctors to treat injured humans.

Experts said the Caesar patient simulator, which “breathes” and “bleeds”, can be used anywhere.

It has been developed to give medics the best possible grounding in how to deal with casualties on the front line and in disaster zones.

The MoD has strongly defended sending its medical staff for the live animal training. …

These never-before-seen photographs of pigs being shot follow Denmark coming under heavy fire over its treatment of giraffes.

This month the zoo in Copenhagen killed a giraffe called Marius to avoid interbreeding – then his body was dissected and fed to the lions as young children watched.

Staff received death threats after the animal’s death.

Another zoo in Denmark then considered killing a giraffe, also called Marius, to avoid fights among males after the planned arrival of a female.

Marius won a reprieve because moves to introduce the female were shelved.

Genetic similarities between people and pigs

Pigs are genetically very close to humans.

The flesh of swine is so similar to our own that if you eat under-cooked pork you can get parasites that live equally as well in our own flesh.

In 2000 a heart doctor gave a patient a transfusion of pig’s blood following a number of attempts at animal-to-human organ transplants.

London surgeon Dr Dhaniram Baruah injected more than half a pint of the blood into a man suffering from severe anemia.

The term ‘long pork’ was reportedly coined by cannibals because human meat tastes like pork.

During an interview from his prison cell Germany’s infamous cannibal Armin Meiwes – who ate an estimated 20kg of his victim – said: “The flesh tastes like pork.“It tastes a little bit more bitter, stronger. It tastes quite good.”

Dutch armed forces lied to PETA about supposedly not subjecting animals to tests, while they did: here.