Wolves back in Denmark


This video from 2013 is called Danish wolf is back.

From Wildlife Extra:

First wolf family heard in Denmark for 200 years

April 2014: It is suspected by a group of wolf enthusiasts in Denmark that the country probably has its first resident wolf family for over 200 years, reports Rewilding Europe. Ulvetracking Danmark has gone to great lengths to register the sounds of the Danish wolves, recorded in Jutland in January. Holly Root-Gutteridge, an English wolf expert and PhD student at Nottingham Trent University, believes that these howls stem from an entire wolf family. This means that these could be the first wolf pups born in the wild of Denmark for well since the early 19th century.

“This is the biggest fauna sensation we have had for many years,” said Mogens Trolle, zoologist in the Nature Science Museum at the University of Copenhagen.

“There’s at least two adults there,” said Root-Gutteridge. “One with a nice deep howl, which is almost a baseline to the chorus, is probably the male and father of the pups, as it’s rare to have unrelated males in the same pack. There are possibly three adults, but I need more analysis of the recording to be sure. There are also pups on there. Considering the recording was made in January, they might be wolves that are eight to 10 months of age, with not quite fully developed howls.”

Listen to the two recordings in Jutland by clicking this link and scrolling down.

That possibility is strengthened by the fact that two different sets of wolf tracks were found on 30 January 2013 in the same area in Jutland where the howls were recorded. Once the world’s most widely distributed mammal, the grey wolf declined across Europe as a result of relentless persecution over centuries. Ultimately, by the 1970s, it was confined to only a few areas in the south and the northeast of the continent. However, with increasing public acceptance and legal protection, combined with an increase in wild ungulate numbers, the wolf has been able to begin to regain more and more of its former territory.

Petitioning The Danish Government. The Danish Government: Please protect Danish Wolves: here.

Wolves near the Dutch-German border: here.

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British army animal abuse in Denmark


This video is called Pigs Strung Up And SHOT To Train British Army Medics In Treating Gunshot Wounds.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain, with photos there:

EXCLUSIVE: Pigs strung up and SHOT to train British Army medics in treating gunshot wounds

Feb 18, 2014 00:00

By Chris Hughes, Andy Lines

Military surgeons are being sent to Denmark for the controversial training on live animals – even though the practice is illegal in the UK

Pigs are being shot so British Army medics can learn to treat battle wounds.

Military surgeons are sent to Denmark for the controversial training on live animals – even though the practice is illegal in the UK.

Animal rights group PETA has slammed the “cruel” practice.

A live pig dangles from a wooden frame as a soldier shoots it to inflict horrific injuries.

Military medics then operate on the animal’s traumatic gunshot wounds while it is still breathing.

The shocking photos taken in Denmark have put the country at the centre of another animal cruelty row after the controversial killing of a giraffe at Copenhagen Zoo.

Campaigners who are disgusted by the pig shootings are demanding an end to the brutal military training courses that are nicknamed Operation Danish Bacon.

This kind of training is banned in Britain – yet our Army medics are sent to Denmark to take part.

Mimi Bekhechi, associate director of animal rights group PETA UK, said: “The overwhelming majority of the UK’s Nato allies do not shoot, stab or dismember animals for their military training exercises.

“The Ministry of Defence’s decision to ship out members of the armed forces for these deadly and cruel exercises in Denmark – which would be illegal if conducted in the UK – is impossible to justify medically, ethically or educationally.”

The pigs are strung up then blasted with an AK-47 rifle or a 9mm handgun.

To give them experience of working on gun wounds, medics then operate on the animals. Even if the surgery is a success, the pigs are later killed.

The British Army sends surgeons to Jaegerspris Kaserne in Denmark twice a year to take part in the exercises.

During the training the pigs are “subjected to bullet and blast wounds”, the UK Government has confirmed. PETA has appealed to the Danish Minister of Defence to stop the country’s animal-based trauma training exercises.

Campaigners argue that hi-tech human simulators should be used instead, adding that they are more realistic than using live animals.

A PETA spokesman said: “Eighty per cent of Nato allies have already ended the cruel use of animals in archaic military medical training exercises. …

PETA has also filed a complaint with the European Commission against Denmark over the training courses.

An EU directive, as well as Denmark’s Animal Welfare Act, require that non-animal methods should be used to train the military whenever available.

A former US military medical worker – who is now with PETA – insisted that compared to operating on animals that have been stabbed or shot, the
lifelike human simulators are a far superior way of preparing doctors to treat injured humans.

Experts said the Caesar patient simulator, which “breathes” and “bleeds”, can be used anywhere.

It has been developed to give medics the best possible grounding in how to deal with casualties on the front line and in disaster zones.

The MoD has strongly defended sending its medical staff for the live animal training. …

These never-before-seen photographs of pigs being shot follow Denmark coming under heavy fire over its treatment of giraffes.

This month the zoo in Copenhagen killed a giraffe called Marius to avoid interbreeding – then his body was dissected and fed to the lions as young children watched.

Staff received death threats after the animal’s death.

Another zoo in Denmark then considered killing a giraffe, also called Marius, to avoid fights among males after the planned arrival of a female.

Marius won a reprieve because moves to introduce the female were shelved.

Genetic similarities between people and pigs

Pigs are genetically very close to humans.

The flesh of swine is so similar to our own that if you eat under-cooked pork you can get parasites that live equally as well in our own flesh.

In 2000 a heart doctor gave a patient a transfusion of pig’s blood following a number of attempts at animal-to-human organ transplants.

London surgeon Dr Dhaniram Baruah injected more than half a pint of the blood into a man suffering from severe anemia.

The term ‘long pork’ was reportedly coined by cannibals because human meat tastes like pork.

During an interview from his prison cell Germany’s infamous cannibal Armin Meiwes – who ate an estimated 20kg of his victim – said: “The flesh tastes like pork.“It tastes a little bit more bitter, stronger. It tastes quite good.”

Dutch armed forces lied to PETA about supposedly not subjecting animals to tests, while they did: here.

Sperm whales stranded in Denmark


This video from Denmark says about itself:

17 Feb 2014

Two sperm whales have stranded in West Jutland this weekend. One was already dead, the other one is still alive, but will be impossible to save. It is still unclear why the whales stranded – but the theory is that they have been ill – or that they have not navigated properly. The two whales are about 14 meters long and are quite an attraction to the locals.

Meanwhile, the second whale has died as well. They were both young males.

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Chechnya offers to save second Danish giraffe Marius


This video is called Niger‘s Endangered White Giraffes (Full Documentary).

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Ramzan Kadyrov offers to adopt second Marius giraffe facing slaughter

Chechen president tells Instagram followers he is ready to take in giraffe facing death in Denmark ‘on humanitarian grounds’

Shaun Walker in Sochi

Thursday 13 February 2014 16.47 GMT

To sentence one giraffe named Marius to death may be regarded as a misfortune; to sentence two would be a catastrophe, according to Ramzan Kadyrov.

The Chechen president has used his Instagram account to offer to take in the second Marius, which, it emerged on Wednesday, has been threatened with the same fate as his namesake.

Kadyrov, who has been implicated in torture and human rights abuses, is a known animal admirer and has a huge personal zoo.

He frequently posts pictures of himself on Instagram with exotic animals, and made his offer of shelter for the second Danish giraffe on the social network.

“I read the information about the fact that in Denmark they are going to end the life of another giraffe,” wrote Kadyrov beneath photographs of lions eating the first Marius, which the Chechen leader said was killed for “invented” reasons.

“On humanitarian grounds, I am ready to take Marius in. We can guarantee him good living conditions and care for his health,” he added.

Only days after the euthanasia of a healthy young giraffe named Marius at Copenhagen zoo sparked controversy around the world, a second Danish zoo announced that it was considering a similar fate for another giraffe, also named Marius.

Jyllands Park zoo, in western Denmark, currently has two male giraffes, but has been approved to participate in the European breeding programme. If zookeepers manage to acquire a female giraffe, seven-year-old Marius will have to make way.

The first Marius was considered useless for breeding because his genes were too common. The prospect of his death prompted an international petition that garnered more than 27,000 signatures, and controversy continued after he was killed when he was dissected in front of a large crowd and then fed to lions.

A new petition to save the second Marius currently has 3,500 signatures.

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Common Linnets at Eurovision song contest


This video is about a common linnet singing.

Common linnets will be the Dutch participants in the 2014 Eurovision song contest in Denmark.

Not meaning the birds, but two Dutch country and western singers with that stage name.

From the Eurovision song contest site:

The Common Linnets to represent the Netherlands in Copenhagen

Hilversum, the Netherlands

Today at the Wisseloord Studios in Hilversum, AVROTROS announced that The Common Linnets (Ilse DeLange and Waylon) will represent the Netherlands at the 2014 Eurovision Song Contest in Copenhagen.

Ilse DeLange and Waylon are definitely not unknown on the Dutch music scene both having made a big impact throughout the years.

Today it was announced by broadcaster AVROTROS that the two have joined together to form The Common Linnets and are poised to represent the Netherlands at Europe’s favourite TV show in May.

It was also announced that the song will be presented at the beginning of March. Below you can find some more information about this exciting duo.

This video says about itself:

The Common Linnets PREVIEW of Eurovision 2014 – The Netherlands.

Danish Little Mermaid 100th birthday


This video is called Little Mermaid in Copenhagen.

From Associated Press today:

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Bikini-clad women have jumped into Copenhagen harbor as part of the 100-year anniversary celebration of the landmark Little Mermaid statue — the Danish capital’s top tourist attraction.

The bronze statue, which draws at least 1 million visitors every year, was created as a tribute to fairy tale writer Hans Christian Andersen. The author penned a story about a sea king’s daughter who fell in love with a prince but had to wait 300 years before she could turn from mermaid into human.

The statue’s international fame grew after its head was stolen in 1963. Since then, it has been vandalized, exploded and repeatedly repaired. It was also exhibited at the Shanghai World Exposition in 2010.

Friday’s celebrations also included speeches, a children’s concert, music and birthday songs.