Parrots and jays in Costa Rica


White-throated magpie jay, 19 March 2014

19 March 2014 in Costa Rica. After the morning, in the afternoon we left the Bajo del Toro area to go to the Arenal volcano region. There, we would see this white-throated magpie jay.

Before arriving there, we had seen many green iguanas at a bridge. A bare-throated night heron on the river bank.

A grey-lined hawk on a wire.

We continued to La Fortuna town. Its original name was El Borio. The name changed in 1968: an Arenal volcano eruption then killed many people, but El Borio was untouched. The new name is about the good fortune of the town during that eruption.

Until recently, Arenal was a working volcano, attracting many tourists and making the town touristy.

In the park in La Fortuna: red-billed pigeon and blue-gray tanager in a tree.

A great-tailed grackle flying.

A tropical kingbird on a wire.

We continued, seeing the white-throated magpie jay already mentioned.

A bit further, a white-fronted parrot in a tree.

Red-lored parrot, 19 March 2014

A red-lored parrot, feeding in another tree.

Crested guan, 19 March 2014

As we continued further, a crested guan.

A chestnut-mandibled toucan in yet another tree.

A white hawk flying.

Arenal volcano, 19 March 2014

The top of the Arenal volcano was covered in clouds.

Sunset, Costa Rica, 19 March 2014

Finally, a beautiful sunset near a bridge.

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Orchids, dippers and tarantula in Costa Rica


Maxillaria ringens, 19 March 2014

The morning of 19 March 2014 on Costa Rica. There were not only orchids along the mountain road yesterday, but in the cloud forest today as well. Like Maxillaria ringens on the photos.

Maxillaria ringens orchid, 19 March 2014

Flower, 19 March 2014

And other species.

Before we went to the cloud forest, a rufous-collared sparrow singing. Hummingbirds at the feeders.

A flock of three-striped warblers on a bush.

A bright-rumped attila in a tree.

A monarch butterfly on flowers.

Chestnut-capped brush finch, adult, 19 March 2014

Like yesterday, a chestnut-capped brush finch.

Inca dove, 19 March 2014

An Inca dove.

Central American agouti, 19 March 2014

And a Central American agouti.

Tarantula, 19 March 2014

This tarantula is of the Brachypelma genus.

Butterfly, Costa Rica, 19 March 2013

About this butterfly, I don’t even know the genus.

Magenta-throated woodstar, 19 March 2014

A male magenta-throated woodstar hummingbird flying. A species which lives only in Costa Rica and Panama.

In the forest, a ruddy-capped nightingale thrush on a branch.

A spotted woodcreeper climbs up a tree trunk.

A tufted flycatcher in a tree.

An American dipper on a rock in the stream.

A sulphur-bellied flycatcher.

American dipper, 19 March 2014

11:35. Two American dippers on rocks in the stream. Unfortunately, just at a time when the camera was acting up. So, just this one photo.

We left, to the Arenal volcano.

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Orchids, armadillos, monkeys and birds in Costa Rica


This video is about national parks in Costa Rica.

18 March 2014.

Costa Rica; after earlier in the afternoon, still near Parque Nacional Juan Castro Blanco.

Bandera española, 18 March 2014

Walking down the mountain road, not only long-tailed silky flycatchers, but also flowers. This orchid species is called bandera española, Spanish flag, in Costa Rica. This is because it has the same red and yellow colours as that flag.

Bandera española, on 18 March 2014

Two nine-banded long-nosed armadillos close to the road.

More mammals: mantled howler monkeys with a youngster.

Clay-coloured thrush, 18 March 2014

A clay-coloured thrush.

Slate-throated redstart, 18 March 2014

We are back. A slate-throated redstart on a branch.

Chestnut-capped brush finch, adult, 18 March 2014

On the other side of the stream, chestnut-capped brush finches.

Chestnut-capped brush finch, adult, Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Chestnut-capped brush finch, juvenile, 18 March 2014

Both adults and juveniles, with duller colours, are present.

Central American agouti, 18 March 2014

Also on that side, a Central American agouti.

A black guan flies, while calling.

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Long-tailed silky flycatchers and band-tailed pigeons in Costa Rica


Long-tailed silky flycatcher male, 18 March 2014

Still 18 March 2014 in the highlands of Costa Rica. After the hummingbirds and the coati earlier in the day, we went higher up the mountains, and saw long-tailed silky flycatchers.

Long-tailed silky flycatcher sings, 18 March 2014

This species lives only in the mountains of Costa Rica and western Panama.

A male and a female sat together in a tree.

Band-tailed pigeons, 18 March 2014

Two band-tailed pigeons sat in another tree.

Long-tailed silky flycatcher, 18 March 2014

As we walked back again, we saw (probably other) long-tailed silky flycatchers again.

Long-tailed silky flycatcher with berry, 18 March 2014

They were feeding on berries.

Long-tailed silky flycatcher, Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Flowers, Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Flowers were there as well. More other flowers, like orchids, will have to wait till a later blog post.

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Hummingbirds and coati in Costa Rica


Magnificent hummingbird male, 18 March 2014

After the golden-browed chlorophonias and other wildlife in the morning of 18 March in Costa Rica, now a blog post mainly about hummingbirds again. Like this male magnificent hummingbird.

A monarch butterfly.

Green-crowned brilliant male, 18 March 2014

2pm. The feeders were temporarily replaced by flowers. A bit unusual for the hummingbirds; still, they kept coming. Like this male green-crowned brilliant.

Green-crowned brilliant male, Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Male violet sabrewing, 18 March 2014

And this violet sabrewing male.

Violet sabrewing male, Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Violet sabrewing male, in Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Green hermit female, 18 March 2014

And this green hermit female.

Green hermit female, Costa Rica, 18 March 2014

Purple-throated mountain-gem and green-crowned brilliant, 18 March 2014

Here, a female purple-throated mountain-gem waits on a stem, while a male green-crowned brilliant hovers.

White-nosed coati, 18 March 2014

Some twenty minutes later: a white-nosed coati on the other side of the stream.

Ten minutes later: a green spiny lizard.

We went away, higher up the mountains.

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Costa Rica chlorophonia and other cloud forest wildlife


Costa Rica cloud forest and epiphytes, 18 March 2014

18 March 2014 near Bosque de Paz, Costa Rica. After the birds and moths of yesterday, to the cloud forest. Many bromeliads and other epiphytes on the trees, as the photos show.

Costa Rica cloud forest, and epiphytes, 18 March 2014

Costa Rica cloud forest, 18 March 2014

In the early morning, a clay-coloured thrush sang.

A black guan in a tree.

Many hummingbirds again.

A sulphur-bellied flycatcher.

A golden-browed chlorophonia.

A red-tailed squirrel.

A ruddy-capped nightingale-thrush crossing a forest path.

An eye-ringed flatbill on a branch.

Slate-throated redstart, 18 March 2014

A slate-throated redstart; singing.

Mantled howler monkeys call.

Another black guan in a tree.

A broad-winged hawk in another tree.

A great black hawk flying.

Torrent tyrannulet, 18 March 2014

8:50: a torrent tyrranulet near the stream.

A boat-billed flycatcher in a tree.

Costa Rica cloud forest flowers and golden-browed chlorophonia, 18 March 2014

A beautiful golden-browed chlorophonia again.

Golden-browed chlorophonia, 18 March 2014

Caterpillar, 18 March 2014

A caterpillar.

Butterfly, Costa Rica, 18 March 2013

Will it become this butterfly? Or another butterfly, or a moth?

Spot-crowned woodcreeper, 18 March 2014

A spot-crowned woodcreeper climbs a tree.

A prong-billed barbet on a branch.

A common bush-tanager. A tropical parula.

A golden-winged warbler.

Yellow-thighed finches, 18 March 2014

Yellow-thighed finches in a tree.

Spangle-cheeked tanager, 18 March 2014

A spangled-cheeked tanager. A species living in mountainous areas of Costa Rica and Panama only.

11:35: we are back. A Central American agouti across the stream.

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More Costa Rican birds, and moths


Black phoebe, 17 March 2014

Still, 17 March 2014 near Bosque del Paz in Costa Rica. Not only hummingbirds, but also other birds, like this black phoebe.

They behave somewhat dipper-like on rocks in mountain streams. But they are an American flycatcher species, unrelated to dippers.

A golden-browed chlorophonia.

On the other side of the stream, a chestnut-capped brushfinch.

Black guan, 17 March 2014

In a big tree, a big bird, living only in Costa Rica and Panama: a black guan.

Rufous-collared sparrow, 17 March 2014

In a smaller tree, a much smaller bird with a much bigger geographical range: a rufous-collared sparrow.

A collared trogon.

Moth, 17 March 2014

Then, time to switch from telephoto lens to macro lens. From birds to moths which had gathered on the building.

Moth, Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

There are thousands of Costa Rican moth species, and I am far from an expert in these species. So, I know there were various moth species, but not which species.

Moth, in Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

Hawk moth, 17 March 2014

The largest specimens belonged to the hawk moth family.

Hawk moth with two smaller moths, 17 March 2014

Finally, a Central American agouti with a baby on the other river bank.

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Costa Rica mountain hummingbirds


This video from Costa Rica is called Juan Castro Blanco National Park. It gives an idea of especially the plant life of the mountainous area around Bosque de Paz where we arrived in the afternoon of 17 March 2014, after the great potoo and red-winged blackbirds of earlier that day.

Feeders around Bosque de Paz attracted many hummingbirds.

Violet sabrewing male, 17 March 2014

These included violet sabrewings; like the male on the photo.

Green-crowned brilliant male, Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

And green-crowned brilliants. The photo shows a male.

Green-crowned brilliant female, in Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

And this photo shows a female.

Green hermit female, 17 March 2014

And green hermits. On the photos, females.

Green hermit female, on 17 March 2014

Green hermit female, Costa Rica, on 17 March 2014

And purple-throated mountain gems. This species lives only in Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

And stripe-tailed hummingbirds.

Scintillant hummingbird male, 17 March 2014

A male scintillant hummingbird on a branch. One of the smallest hummingbird species.

Magnificent hummingbird female, 17 March 2014

This photo shows a female magnificent hummingbird.

A list of Bosque de Paz bird species is here.

More Bosque de Paz birdlife and other wildlife to come on this blog. Stay tuned!

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Great potoo and red-winged blackbirds in Costa Rica


Great potoo, 17 March 2014

17 March 2014 in Costa Rica. We leave the area of the Sarapiqui river where we were in the morning, for the mountains. In the mountains, we saw this special bird: a great potoo, about which more soon.

From the bus: a grey-breasted martin and a tropical kingbird on a wire.

Then, a sign along the road, saying: potoo. Great potoos are big nocturnal birds. Usually, during daytime, they rest in big trees, well camouflaged by their colour and shape. This great potoo here, however, rests on a leafless branch of a big solitary tree, unusually clearly visible.

Great potoo, Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

The people of the house on the hill near the potoo tree welcome birdwatchers.

This is a video of a great potoo at night. This species does not only live in Central America, but also in South American countries like in Suriname.

There are also golden-hooded tanagers in the great potoo tree. And a clay-coloured thrush.

Four brown-hooded parrots flying overhead.

Ruddy ground-dove, 17 March 2014

A ruddy ground-dove sits nearby.

Red-winged blackbird on grass, 17 March 2014

We continue to an area with many meadows. And with many red-winged blackbirds from North America, wintering here.

Red-winged blackbird, 17 March 2014

They sit on grass stems, while singing.

Red-winged blackbird on pole, 17 March 2014

They sit on wires, and on poles.

Red-winged blackbird still on pole, 17 March 2014

Barn swallows flying around.

A white-tailed kite hovering.

Three crimson-fronted parakeets flying.

We continue, higher and higher up the mountains.

Stay tuned!

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Hummingbirds, flowers and iguana in Costa Rica


Montezuma's oropendola male, 17 March 2014

Still the morning of 17 March 2014 near the Sarapiqui river in Costa Rica. After the earlier Montezuma’s oropendola’s, we see this bird species again. Doing gymnastics on a branch again.

Stripe-throated hermit, 17 March 2014

A stripe-throated hermit hummingbird. Some hermits are big for hummingbirds, but this one is one of the smallest species.

Flower, Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

It likes the beautiful flowers, which grow here. And in the botanical garden on the other site of the road, where we would go later and where the flower photos were taken.

Flower, in Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

Flower, in Costa Rica, on 17 March 2014

Green iguana, 17 March 2014

Much bigger than the little hummingbird is a green iguana.

We cross the main road. Groove-billed anis on the other side.

Two social flycatchers on a wire.

A house wren. A singing grey-crowned yellowthroat.

A pond in the botanical garden attracts damselflies.

A black-cheeked woodpecker in a tree.

A Central American agouti walking in the garden.

A scaly-breasted hummingbird on a branch cleans its feathers.

A black-cowled oriole in another tree.

In yet another tree, a yellow-olive flycatcher.

Rufous-tailed hummingbird, 17 March 2014

A rufous-tailed hummingbird; sometimes, on a branch; sometimes flying.

A masked tityra. A boat-billed flycatcher.

Back across the main road. In a treetop, an olive-throated parakeet.

Clay-coloured thrush, Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

A clay-coloured thrush.

Butterfly, Costa Rica, 17 March 2014

We walk along the forest trail. A butterfly.

Summer tanager male, 17 March 2014

A bird from North America wintering here: a male summer tanager.

Montezuma's oropendola, 17 March 2014

Let us finish this blog post like we started it, with a Montezuma’s oropendola.

Stay tuned!

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