Red-tailed hawks’ nest update from Cornell, USA


This video from Cornell, USA says about itself:

25 April 2013

Ezra stays in nest to protect Big Red and brood from hail and rain in Ithaca.

From the Cornell Lab or Ornithology in the USA, today:

The nestling Red-tailed Hawks high above Cornell’s campus continue to grow on a steady supply of rodents, rabbits, and snakes delivered by Big Red and Ezra. Although the young hawks are still cloaked in down, these feathers will soon give way to their juvenile plumage and they’ll be left alone for longer periods at the nest site. If last year’s fledge interval is any indication of when these young hawks will fledge, we can expect a first flight sometime around June 9. Watch the webcam here.

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American crows, new studies video


The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA writes about this video:

To Know the Crow: Insights and Stories From a Quarter-Century of Crow Study

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

American Crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods, becoming one of our most familiar birds. They have socially intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local dumpster—in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American Crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin McGowan first began banding them.

McGowan, a scientist who works in the Cornell Lab’s Education program, and his collaborator Anne Clark, of Binghamton University, gave a seminar about their research to a packed house at the Cornell Lab. Watch this archived video of their talk to hear their crow studies and stories, including tales of family values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease:

(Note: if you want to skip the introductory matter, the main talk begins at about 7:10)

The talk took place on April 21, 2014. It was part of the Cornell Lab’s long-running Monday Night Seminar series, a tradition established decades ago by Lab founder Dr. Arthur Allen.

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Baby red-tailed hawks hatching on webcam


This video is called “Born Free” A Red-Tailed Hawk Chick.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Hawk Hatch Has Begun!

We’re excited to share the news with you that the first egg in the 2014 Cornell hawks nest has begun pipping! Earlier today a small hole was seen forming and there is a high likelihood of seeing a new downy nestling enter the world over the next 24 hours. “Pipping” refers to the process of the chick initially breaking through the shell, using a hard projection on its bill called the egg tooth. The resulting hole is the “pip” that the chick then enlarges to finish hatching. This year’s pip follows 38 days of stalwart incubation by Big Red and Ezra in often windy, rainy, and snowy conditions.

Don’t miss your chance to see the young hawk emerge and share your excitement with the cams community at http://allaboutbirds.org/cornellhawks.

As if hatching hawks aren’t enough to keep you busy, be sure to also check out the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam where three eager owlets continue to grow at a breakneck pace thanks to prey delivered by the two adults.

We’ll notify the winner of the Guess-the-Hatch Contest in the coming week and continue to post updates on the Bird Cams Facebook page and on Twitter at @birdcams. Thank you for watching!

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Cornell red-tailed hawk nest update


This video from the USA about red-tailed hawks says about itself:

27 March 2014

Big Red has been vocalizing for quite a long time, Ezra is perched atop Bradfield Hall but we cannot tell whether or not he is answering. Soon BR decides that the conversation is over and takes flight from the nest. Ezra then leaves Bradfield & takes over incubation duties on the nest. What a team they make!

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Guess When the Hawks Will Hatch!

With three warm eggs and a fortified stick nest, Big Red and Ezra are making steady progress toward hatching out a new set of nestlings in the next week. Red-tailed Hawk eggs usually take between 28 and 35 days to hatch, but the last two years the Cornell hawks incubated for longer durations: 38 days in 2012 and 39 in 2013. This year’s first egg was laid on March 19 at 1:11 P.M. EDT and this Friday, April 25, would be the 37th day since the first egg was laid, but it’s a new year and anybody’s guess when the eggs will begin hatching.

To add to the excitement of watching new life enter the world, we’re running a contest to see who can guess the hatch date and time of the first egg to the closest minute. “Hatch” for the purposes of the contest involves the first time that a chick’s complete head is visible and the cap is off the egg. The winner will receive a Cornell Lab starter kit (including a special edition Bird Cams notepad, thermal cooler, tote bag, coffee mug, journal and pen, plus a microfiber lens cloth cleaner), and everyone who enters can download a wallpaper closeup image of Big Red. Good luck!

Enter your guess now.

We’ll continue to post updates on the Bird Cams Facebook page and on Twitter at @birdcams.

Thank you for watching!

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Red-tailed hawks, great blue herons nest webcams update


This video from the USA is called Cornell Red Tailed Hawks ‘Big Red & Ezra Tending First Egg’, 15 March 2013.

That was last year. Now, this year.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Hawks and Herons

Big Red and Ezra are busily incubating their 3-egg clutch (Watch Now). In past years it has taken nearly 40 days till the first egg hatches, so anytime during the last week of April we could see our first nestling!

We are also still waiting to see whether the resident Great Blue Herons will return to breed at their nest in Sapsucker Woods. We plan to reopen chat once courting begins or the male begins more extensive nestbuilding. For now, enjoy the views of the Sapsucker Woods Pond from the pan-tilt-zoom camera operated by our volunteer moderators as we await the herons’ nest initiation.

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Baby owls born on American webcams


This video from North America is called Barred Owl nest and youngsters fledging.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Our Owls Are a Hoot!

With the launch of two new owl cams—the Barn Owl cam in Texas and the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam in Indiana—the excitement is building. Early in the morning on April 8, the first of three Barred Owl eggs hatched revealing a downy owlet (watch the highlight). A second owlet hatched out on April 9, and the third appears to have hatched today. The Barn Owls‘ first egg appeared the same day the Barred Owls began hatching, and today they added a second! They’re expected to continue to add to their clutch over the next week.

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Bird nest webcams in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Cheep Cheep – A story about a bird’s nest of robin eggs hatching

“Cheep Cheep” is a mini-documentary that tells the day-by-day story of a bird’s nest we discovered under our deck in the Spring of 2012. The video was shot in HDTV on a Panasonic HDC-HS900 Camcorder, which was mounted on a monopod, and allowed extreme close up footage without disrupting the nest.

“Cheep Cheep” spans a twenty day period of time, and is appropriate for all ages. The story illustrates the incredible process of development in the life of a baby bird, and gives a heartwarming glimpse at the touching bond between parent and child.

Tip – For best picture, change your video playback quality to ‘HD.’

White-tailed eagle webcam in the Netherlands: here.
From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

We can scarcely keep up with all the developments at Bird Cams—especially our TWO new owl cams: a Barn Owl in Texas and a Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam in Indiana. Plus, the Cornell hawks are incubating three eggs, a Great Blue Heron has returned to the pond, and Kaloakulua, the young Laysan Albatross, is starting to show her first white feathers. Watch the cams.

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