Birds and musicians, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Birds Got Swing: A Musical Experiment

8 July 2014

What happens when a jazz composer challenges a vocal virtuoso to match the voices of some of her favorite birds? Serious fun. Join Grammy recognized artists Maria Schneider and Theo Bleckmann in their musical experiment to help us tune in to nature’s music—from the melodious to the downright weird. You’ll never think of a sparrow or a toilet plunger in the same way again.

Then explore our Birds Got Swing playlist from the Macaulay Library archive.

Theo’s music at http://theobleckmann.com.

Maria’s music at http://mariaschneider.com.

Brought to you by the All About Bird Biology team at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Young red-tailed hawk saved


This video from Cornell in the USA is called Cornell Hawks: E3 Fledges. June 14, 2014.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

E3 Recovering After Post-Fledging Mishap

All three young Red-tailed Hawks fledged from the nest of Big Red and Ezra, with E2 departing on June 6, followed by siblings E1 and E3 on June 14. Watch this clip of E3’s spectacular first flight. [see above]

Unfortunately, just one day after fledging, E3 was injured while resting on a greenhouse roof. An automated greenhouse vent closed, pinning E3. BOGs (birders on the ground) and chat moderators swung into action immediately to notify greenhouse staff. Meanwhile, the vent automatically opened and the staff soon disabled it to prevent it from closing again. Because E3 was unable to fly, Victoria Campbell, a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and Cornell Lab staffer, took E3 to Cornell University’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Health Center. Veterinarians there performed surgery on June 18 to repair E3’s broken wing.

Surgery went well but we will have to wait and see if and how the bone heals and if the flight muscles are fully functional. Meanwhile, E3 is eating and doing well. We’ll continue to post updates to the Bird Cams Facebook page as we learn more. A special thanks to the veterinarians and staff at the Wildlife Health Center for the excellent medical care, and to the cams community for your support.

Young red-tailed hawks fledging on webcam


This video from the USA says about itself:

First Cornell Hawks Fledge of 2014. June 6, 2014.

At 8:05AM EDT, the first nestling, E2, fledged a little earlier than expected!

On a blustery morning the young bird walked out to the ‘fledge ledge’, where we have seen juveniles from previous years fledge. After standing on the ledge for a while the nestling stretches its wings and loses balance. Sweeping under the nest platform the hawk glides towards Weill Hall, coming to a safe stop on a window sill with its back against the window. It then manages to grab hold of the edge of the window sill as it tumbles forward. After hanging from the ledge for a few moments of suspense it manages to flap up safely on to the sill where it stays. The bird appears to be fine, with no injuries as it stretches out its wings and begins preening. It is likely to stay there for a while and will probably be visited and fed by the parents.

Watch the Hawks live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cornellhawks.

See Newly Hatched Osprey Chicks on Live ‘Critter Cam': here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

North American bird songs learning game


This video from the USA says about itself:

Bird Song Hero: The song learning game for everyone

27 May 2014

For the full challenge, including the Bird Song Hero Ultimate round and free bird song downloads, visit here.

Train your brain to recognize and remember bird songs with the Bird Song Hero matching game. In this five-question video quiz you’ll listen closely to featured songs and match each with the correct sound visualization. Bird Song Hero is a fun way to practice the key skills you need to ID all the bird songs you’re curious about. Brought to you by the All About Bird Biology team at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. You can find more interactives, quizzes, and videos to help you understand birds on our free educational website.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Red-tailed hawks’ nest update from Cornell, USA


This video from Cornell, USA says about itself:

25 April 2013

Ezra stays in nest to protect Big Red and brood from hail and rain in Ithaca.

From the Cornell Lab or Ornithology in the USA, today:

The nestling Red-tailed Hawks high above Cornell’s campus continue to grow on a steady supply of rodents, rabbits, and snakes delivered by Big Red and Ezra. Although the young hawks are still cloaked in down, these feathers will soon give way to their juvenile plumage and they’ll be left alone for longer periods at the nest site. If last year’s fledge interval is any indication of when these young hawks will fledge, we can expect a first flight sometime around June 9. Watch the webcam here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

American crows, new studies video


The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA writes about this video:

To Know the Crow: Insights and Stories From a Quarter-Century of Crow Study

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

American Crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods, becoming one of our most familiar birds. They have socially intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local dumpster—in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American Crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin McGowan first began banding them.

McGowan, a scientist who works in the Cornell Lab’s Education program, and his collaborator Anne Clark, of Binghamton University, gave a seminar about their research to a packed house at the Cornell Lab. Watch this archived video of their talk to hear their crow studies and stories, including tales of family values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease:

(Note: if you want to skip the introductory matter, the main talk begins at about 7:10)

The talk took place on April 21, 2014. It was part of the Cornell Lab’s long-running Monday Night Seminar series, a tradition established decades ago by Lab founder Dr. Arthur Allen.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Baby red-tailed hawks hatching on webcam


This video is called “Born Free” A Red-Tailed Hawk Chick.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Hawk Hatch Has Begun!

We’re excited to share the news with you that the first egg in the 2014 Cornell hawks nest has begun pipping! Earlier today a small hole was seen forming and there is a high likelihood of seeing a new downy nestling enter the world over the next 24 hours. “Pipping” refers to the process of the chick initially breaking through the shell, using a hard projection on its bill called the egg tooth. The resulting hole is the “pip” that the chick then enlarges to finish hatching. This year’s pip follows 38 days of stalwart incubation by Big Red and Ezra in often windy, rainy, and snowy conditions.

Don’t miss your chance to see the young hawk emerge and share your excitement with the cams community at http://allaboutbirds.org/cornellhawks.

As if hatching hawks aren’t enough to keep you busy, be sure to also check out the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam where three eager owlets continue to grow at a breakneck pace thanks to prey delivered by the two adults.

We’ll notify the winner of the Guess-the-Hatch Contest in the coming week and continue to post updates on the Bird Cams Facebook page and on Twitter at @birdcams. Thank you for watching!

Enhanced by Zemanta