Red-tailed hawks, great blue herons nest webcams update


This video from the USA is called Cornell Red Tailed Hawks ‘Big Red & Ezra Tending First Egg’, 15 March 2013.

That was last year. Now, this year.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Hawks and Herons

Big Red and Ezra are busily incubating their 3-egg clutch (Watch Now). In past years it has taken nearly 40 days till the first egg hatches, so anytime during the last week of April we could see our first nestling!

We are also still waiting to see whether the resident Great Blue Herons will return to breed at their nest in Sapsucker Woods. We plan to reopen chat once courting begins or the male begins more extensive nestbuilding. For now, enjoy the views of the Sapsucker Woods Pond from the pan-tilt-zoom camera operated by our volunteer moderators as we await the herons’ nest initiation.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Baby owls born on American webcams


This video from North America is called Barred Owl nest and youngsters fledging.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Our Owls Are a Hoot!

With the launch of two new owl cams—the Barn Owl cam in Texas and the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam in Indiana—the excitement is building. Early in the morning on April 8, the first of three Barred Owl eggs hatched revealing a downy owlet (watch the highlight). A second owlet hatched out on April 9, and the third appears to have hatched today. The Barn Owls‘ first egg appeared the same day the Barred Owls began hatching, and today they added a second! They’re expected to continue to add to their clutch over the next week.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Bird nest webcams in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Cheep Cheep – A story about a bird’s nest of robin eggs hatching

“Cheep Cheep” is a mini-documentary that tells the day-by-day story of a bird’s nest we discovered under our deck in the Spring of 2012. The video was shot in HDTV on a Panasonic HDC-HS900 Camcorder, which was mounted on a monopod, and allowed extreme close up footage without disrupting the nest.

“Cheep Cheep” spans a twenty day period of time, and is appropriate for all ages. The story illustrates the incredible process of development in the life of a baby bird, and gives a heartwarming glimpse at the touching bond between parent and child.

Tip – For best picture, change your video playback quality to ‘HD.’

White-tailed eagle webcam in the Netherlands: here.
From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

We can scarcely keep up with all the developments at Bird Cams—especially our TWO new owl cams: a Barn Owl in Texas and a Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam in Indiana. Plus, the Cornell hawks are incubating three eggs, a Great Blue Heron has returned to the pond, and Kaloakulua, the young Laysan Albatross, is starting to show her first white feathers. Watch the cams.

Enhanced by Zemanta

First North American bluebird twins discovered


This video is called Eastern Bluebird Singing.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

First Recorded Bluebird Twins Found by NestWatch Volunteer

Last year an Eastern Bluebird laid three normal eggs and one large egg in one of NestWatcher Gerald Clark’s nest boxes. A few weeks later he had five nestlings in the box, and his finding became a scientific paper on the first recorded instance of twins in bluebirds. (The Lab’s Dr. Caren Cooper tackled just how rare an event this is in a blog post for the journal PLOS.) The finding is a direct example of how citizen scientists contribute to scientific discovery each time they participate. Try NestWatch this season!

Enhanced by Zemanta

Barn swallows and light, help new study


This is a barn swallow video from the USA.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

NestWatchers Needed For New Barn Swallow Study

We live in an incredibly well-lit world. All that wattage in heavily-populated areas creates a halo glow that brightens the night sky. Researchers at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Syracuse University, and Globe at Night are seeking participants for a unique new study. Scientists want to know what impact all that extra night light might have on the circadian rhythms of life using Barn Swallows as their subjects. Barn Swallows have adapted to live near humans and nest almost exclusively on structures such as bridges, homes, and yes, barns. Volunteers can sign up through NestWatch.

“Specifically, we’re hoping to learn if the artificial light has an effect—good or bad—on what we call the ‘pace of life,’” says Cornell Lab of Ornithology researcher Caren Cooper. “It’s been established that creatures that live in areas where daytime is shorter during breeding, such as the tropics, have a lower metabolism and a longer life span. On the flip side, animals that breed where there is more daylight tend to have a faster metabolism and shorter life. Is the pace of life for Barn Swallows increasing if they live in areas where the days seem even longer due to artificial lights?”

“Previous studies have shown that birds living in areas with artificial light at night start singing well before dawn, start eating earlier, eat more during the day, and have more complex social interactions,” says researcher Margaret Voss at Syracuse University. “Expanding those activities takes its toll in energy use. We want to learn how that might play out when it comes to health and survival as the Barn Swallows build nests and raise their chicks.”

If Barn Swallows nest near you, get involved in the Barn Swallow project. Sign up to learn more about how the study is being carried out through NestWatch and Globe at Night.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Ornithologist interviewed, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Careers with Birds: Interview with Kim Bostwick

10 Jan 2014

Kim Bostwick’s ground-breaking research on manakins has been featured in National Geographic Magazine and she’s currently the curator of the Bird and Mammal collections at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology‘s Museum of Vertebrates. Kim started as a young animal lover in rural Vermont and has since spent her life studying birds. Visit the Young Birders Network website (www.youngbirdersnetwork.net) to read more about careers in ornithology.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology writes about Ms Bostwick:

How a Bird Sings With Its Wings: Dr. Kim Bostwick’s field research centers on the Club-winged Manakin, a bird that makes a remarkable, high-pitched hum in one of the strangest ways imaginable. She discovered the secret over the course of many years, using experiments and high-speed video, and her website tells the story in fascinating detail and great video.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Young Birders Event in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Cornell Lab of Ornithology Young Birders Event 2013

28 jan 2014

A group of the brightest young birders gathers for one weekend each summer at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to explore their shared passions for science, nature, and birds.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology writes about this event in 2014:

Apply by March 15 for Young Birders Event

Our annual Young Birders Event is one long weekend of total immersion in the world of birds and science at the Cornell Lab. Attendees go birding, take classes from our scientists, explore our collections, discover careers, and make friends. The event is open to rising high school sophomores through seniors; 16 young people are chosen. Enrollment is competitive, but the experience will be unforgettable. This year’s event is July 10–13; thanks to Zeiss for making this event possible. Learn more and apply by March 15.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Backyard Bird Count, worldwide 14-17 February


This video from the USA says about itself:

17 Dec 2013

Watch the video to learn more about the world-wide Great Backyard Bird Count and how you can take part in the 17th annual event from February 14-17, 2014. It’s free, it’s easy, and it’s fun! Visit www.BirdCount.org for birding tips, great photos, and much more.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Everyone’s favorite midwinter bird count is happening this February 14–17, and for the second year in a row it’s open to anyone, anywhere in the world. The Great Backyard Bird Count is a free event now in its 17th year, and by participating you’re helping give scientists their biggest, broadest single-moment snapshot of bird populations.

Last year nearly 138,000 people participated, counting 33.4 million birds and 4,258 species. A newly redesigned website is full of great features like a gorgeous display for your photo submissions, how-to materials, data exploration tools, and tricky bird ID help (our blog has more on what’s new). Come count with us.

See also here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Golden eagle in the snow, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Golden Eagle Flying Through Snow

27 Nov 2013

A female golden eagle flies from her rocky perch as an early season snowfall blankets Wyoming’s sagebrush steppe.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA writes about this:

A Quiet Moment in the Snow—With a Very Large Eagle

Our Multimedia program is working on a documentary about the great sagebrush ecosystems of the American West. Tying together the many strands of that story is one of the region’s top predators, the Golden Eagle. On a filming expedition last fall, as a morning snowstorm descended on the gray-green plains of Wyoming, we captured a brief moment with one of these majestic predators.

January 2014: Tomorrow, wildlife cameraman and natural history presenter, Gordon Buchanan will talk to the Holyrood Petitions Committee about getting the golden eagle adopted as Scotland’s national bird: here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Free North American birds app


This video from the USA says about itself:

Merlin Bird ID–Free app from the Cornell Lab

7 Jan 2014

What’s that bird? Merlin Bird ID is a free app designed to solve the mystery. Merlin asks a few simple questions, then reveals a list of birds that match your description and are expected in your area. It’s designed to make bird identification easier! Enjoy stunning photos and listen to bird songs.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Introducing Merlin Bird ID: A New Kind of Birding App

Information overload is the bane of the beginning bird watcher—as anyone knows who has ever flipped through 40 species of sparrows in a field guide. What if an app could quickly tell you which birds are most likely based on your location, date, and a brief description? Not just which birds theoretically could occur near you, but which birds are actually reported most often by other birders. That’s what Merlin Bird ID does. And it’s free—because we want to make bird watching easier for everyone.

Merlin Bird ID covers 285 of the most common birds of North America (with more on the way). In addition to help with ID, it contains expert tips, more than 1,400 gorgeous photos, and sounds for each species. It’s available now for iPhone and other iOS7 devices, and it’s coming soon for Android.

Enhanced by Zemanta