North Sea coral discovery


This video from Britain says about itself:

26 May 2014

Join us on a simulated journey through the undersea landscapes of the south west of England from Ilfracombe to delicate pink sea fans in Lyme Bay via Chesil Beach and Berry Head. Common cuttlefish, hermit crab, bootlace seaweed and long snouted sea horse can be found here. Watch plaice send a hermit crab packing before approaching The Lizard’s thick carpets of jewel anenomes, dead man’s fingers and Devonshire cup coral. As we reach the Atlantic we come across sun fish, lion’s mane jellyfish, basking sharks and bottle-nosed dolphins before surfacing at Ilfracombe in Devon. Grey seals swim along corkwing wrasse, ballan wrasse and swimming crabs all searching for food amongst sponges.

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands, 16 September 2014:

During a 10-day diving expedition in the North Sea there were a number of discoveries in ancient sunken ships. The rare polychaete worm Sabellaria [spinulosa] was found for example. But the most remarkable find was a piece of Devonshire cup-coral. Although this species lives occasionally near the English east coast, it was the first time that hard coral was found in the middle of the North Sea.

Great Barrier Reef let down by Australian government


This video is called BBC Great Barrier Reef II 2012 HD.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Campaigners dismiss inadequate Australian Great Barrier Reef protection plan

Tuesday 16th September 2014

Environmental activists lashed out at a new Australian government plan purporting to protect the Great Barrier Reef yesterday.

The plan had been released to allay UN concerns but the activists said that it was inadequate to halt the reef’s decline.

Environment Minister Greg Hunt claimed that the draft “Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan” was an effort to balance important priorities.

“Maintaining and protecting this iconic World Heritage area, while considering the needs for long-term sustainable development, is a critical priority,” Mr Hunt alleged.

But WWF Australia head Dermot O’Gorman said the draft did not set high enough targets for cutting agricultural pollution or provide “the billions of dollars required to restore the health of the reef.”

“At this stage, Reef 2050 lacks the bold new actions needed in order to halt the reef’s decline,” Mr O’Gorman said.

The draft plan bans future port development in the Fitzroy Delta, Keppel Bay and North Curtis Island near Rockhampton in Queensland state — areas of the reef described by environmentalists as key incubators of marine life — but it exempts priority port development areas from the ban.

Australian Marine Conservation Society spokeswoman Felicity Wishart said it should have recommended laws to minimise dredging as well as ban dumping in reef waters.

“From our point of view the reef is in dire straits,” she said, adding that the plan should have been a “lifeline” to turn the reef around over the next 35 years.

Ghost shrimps filmed by diver


This video is about ghost shrimps or Caprellidae, a family of amphipod crustaceans.

Here, they are near the bridge across the Oosterschelde estuary, on top of dead man’s fingers, a soft coral species.

Diver Jack Oomen made the video.

Bermuda coral reefs research, video


This video says about itself:

11 August 2014

2014 Bermuda Deep Reef Expedition

California Academy of Sciences
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences
Ocean Support Foundation

Initial Characterization of Bermudian
Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems:
Visual Census of Mesophotic Biodiversity
Impact Assessment and Culling of Invasive Lionfish

Hudson Pinheiro
Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley
Elliott Jessup
Alex Chequer

Equipment Support:
Hollis Gear

Video:
Elliott Jessup

Parrotfish help coral reefs survice


This video says about itself:

The parrotfish is an interesting specimen. Not only do they change sex from female to male as they get older but parrotfish like blowing spit bubbles to sleep in.

A giant spit bubble sleeping bag.

In the morning the parrotfish goes about living its life on the reef, spending its day happily munching coral with its huge buck teeth. The fish grinds the coral down to extract the algae. Like all animals – what goes in must come out and the fish poops out the undigested rock as sand. A single fish can produce 200 lbs of sand a year.

From Wildlife Extra:

Corals need more parrotfish to survive

A decline in parrotfish and sea urchin numbers is a bigger cause of Caribbean coral loss than global warming, a new report suggests, and by increasing these populations the reefs have a chance of recovery.

The corals have declined by more than 50 per cent since the 1970s and only about one-sixth of their original coral cover remain.

These species are the area’s two main grazers and the loss of them breaks the delicate eco-balance of corals and allows algae, on which they feed, to smother the reefs.

“The rate at which the Caribbean corals have been declining is truly alarming,” says Carl Gustaf Lundin, Director of IUCN’s Global Marine and Polar Programme.

“But this study brings some very encouraging news: the fate of Caribbean corals is not beyond our control and there are some very concrete steps that we can take to help them recover.”

“Even if we could somehow make climate change disappear tomorrow, these reefs would continue their decline,” says Jeremy Jackson, lead author of the report and IUCN’s senior advisor on coral reefs.

“We must immediately address the grazing problem for the reefs to stand any chance of surviving future climate shifts.”

The research was carried out by the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

New marine species discoveries in Bonaire sea


This video says about itself:

Lionfish spotted in Bonaire

21 June 2013

Lionfish spotted with the submarine spotted at depths of approximately 300feet deep. These were spotted on a sunken boat where many of them created their habitat.

From IMARES research institute in Wageningen, the Netherlands, last year:

The marine biologists Erik Meesters and Lisa Becking of IMARES Wageningen UR have explored Bonaire‘s deep reef using a submarine. They found unusual animals, fossil reefs, and even archaeological artefacts.

The goal of the Bonaire Deep Reef Expedition is to take an initial inventory of the habitat and biodiversity of the deep reef.

On the morning of 18 May 2014, Lisa Becking was interviewed by Vroege Vpgels radio in the Netherlands about the results of the expedition. Photos are here.

Ms Becking said the discoveries included 13 sponge species, new for science; and two sponge species already known from elsewhere, but not from Bonaire waters yet. They found 30 sponge species, so half was new, either for Bonaire, or for science.

They also found one new shrimp species and two new fish species.

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