Ghost shrimps filmed by diver


This video is about ghost shrimps or Caprellidae, a family of amphipod crustaceans.

Here, they are near the bridge across the Oosterschelde estuary, on top of dead man’s fingers, a soft coral species.

Diver Jack Oomen made the video.

Bermuda coral reefs research, video


This video says about itself:

11 August 2014

2014 Bermuda Deep Reef Expedition

California Academy of Sciences
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences
Ocean Support Foundation

Initial Characterization of Bermudian
Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems:
Visual Census of Mesophotic Biodiversity
Impact Assessment and Culling of Invasive Lionfish

Hudson Pinheiro
Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley
Elliott Jessup
Alex Chequer

Equipment Support:
Hollis Gear

Video:
Elliott Jessup

Parrotfish help coral reefs survice


This video says about itself:

The parrotfish is an interesting specimen. Not only do they change sex from female to male as they get older but parrotfish like blowing spit bubbles to sleep in.

A giant spit bubble sleeping bag.

In the morning the parrotfish goes about living its life on the reef, spending its day happily munching coral with its huge buck teeth. The fish grinds the coral down to extract the algae. Like all animals – what goes in must come out and the fish poops out the undigested rock as sand. A single fish can produce 200 lbs of sand a year.

From Wildlife Extra:

Corals need more parrotfish to survive

A decline in parrotfish and sea urchin numbers is a bigger cause of Caribbean coral loss than global warming, a new report suggests, and by increasing these populations the reefs have a chance of recovery.

The corals have declined by more than 50 per cent since the 1970s and only about one-sixth of their original coral cover remain.

These species are the area’s two main grazers and the loss of them breaks the delicate eco-balance of corals and allows algae, on which they feed, to smother the reefs.

“The rate at which the Caribbean corals have been declining is truly alarming,” says Carl Gustaf Lundin, Director of IUCN’s Global Marine and Polar Programme.

“But this study brings some very encouraging news: the fate of Caribbean corals is not beyond our control and there are some very concrete steps that we can take to help them recover.”

“Even if we could somehow make climate change disappear tomorrow, these reefs would continue their decline,” says Jeremy Jackson, lead author of the report and IUCN’s senior advisor on coral reefs.

“We must immediately address the grazing problem for the reefs to stand any chance of surviving future climate shifts.”

The research was carried out by the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

New marine species discoveries in Bonaire sea


This video says about itself:

Lionfish spotted in Bonaire

21 June 2013

Lionfish spotted with the submarine spotted at depths of approximately 300feet deep. These were spotted on a sunken boat where many of them created their habitat.

From IMARES research institute in Wageningen, the Netherlands, last year:

The marine biologists Erik Meesters and Lisa Becking of IMARES Wageningen UR have explored Bonaire‘s deep reef using a submarine. They found unusual animals, fossil reefs, and even archaeological artefacts.

The goal of the Bonaire Deep Reef Expedition is to take an initial inventory of the habitat and biodiversity of the deep reef.

On the morning of 18 May 2014, Lisa Becking was interviewed by Vroege Vpgels radio in the Netherlands about the results of the expedition. Photos are here.

Ms Becking said the discoveries included 13 sponge species, new for science; and two sponge species already known from elsewhere, but not from Bonaire waters yet. They found 30 sponge species, so half was new, either for Bonaire, or for science.

They also found one new shrimp species and two new fish species.

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New Caledonia creates large protected marine area


This video says about itself:

National Geographic Pristine Seas Expeditions | New Caledonia

26 February 2014

Last year the governments of New Caledonia and Australia announced their commitment to create a large marine park in the Coral Sea extending across the maritime boundary between these two countries.

However, a large portion of the Coral Sea in New Caledonia (in particular the remote Chesterfield Banks on the western region) has barely been explored.

In November 2013, National Geographic partnered with Blancpain, the Waitt Institute and the Institute de Recherche pour le Developement (IRD) of New Caledonia to explore, survey, and film these remote reefs through a Pristine Seas expedition.

The team traveled to the Chesterfield and the Entrecasteaux Reefs on the north, as well as to Petri and Astrolabe in the east. The main objectives of this Pristine Seas expedition were to fill gaps in scientific data on this area and to produce a documentary film.

Relive the expedition in the National Geographic Explorers Journal blog.

From Mongabay.com:

New Caledonia officially creates world’s largest protected area (photos)

May 02, 2014

The government of New Caledonia last week officially created the world’s largest protected area, establishing a multi-use zone that at 1.3 million square kilometers is three times the size of Germany, reports Conservation International (CI).

The Natural Park of the Coral Sea (Le Parc Naturel de la Mer de Corail) covers all of New Caledonia’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), which is home to 4,500 square kilometers of coral reefs, 25 species of marine mammals, 48 shark species, 19 species of nesting birds and five species of marine turtles, according to CI. And because New Caledonia is governed by France, the commitment boosts the proportion of France’s national jurisdiction marine waters under protection from four percent to 16 percent.

The protected area is zoned for multiple types of use, including fishing under a management plan that aims for sustainability.

CI says the protected area will be integrated into the Pacific Oceanscape, an initiative by 16 Pacific Island nations and six territories to collaboratively manage nearly 40 million square kilometers, and the Big Ocean Network

“This is a monumental decision for New Caledonia and the entire Pacific,” said David Emmett, Senior Vice-President for Conservation International’s program in the Asia-Pacific, in a statement. “Such a measure exemplifies what other countries in the Pacific can do to fully invest in the long term health and productivity of their ocean resources.”

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