Will marine area in Myanmar be protected?


This video says about itself:

Reef Life of the Andaman (full marine biology documentary)

“Reef Life of the Andaman” is a documentary of the marine life of Thailand and Burma (Myanmar).

Scuba diving more than 1000 times from the coral reefs and underwater pinnacles of Thailand‘s Similan Islands, Phuket, Phi Phi Island and Hin Daeng, to Myanmar’s Mergui Archipelago and Burma Banks, I encountered everything from manta rays to seahorses, whale sharks to shipwrecks. The 116-minute film features descriptions of 213 different marine species including more than 100 tropical fish, along with sharks, rays, moray eels, crabs, lobsters, shrimps, sea slugs, cuttlefish, squid, octopus, turtles, sea snakes, starfish, sea cucumbers, corals, worms etc..

From Wildlife Extra:

New Marine Protected Area for Myanmar

A new, possible Marine Protected Area in Myanmar’s Myeik archipelago is under consideration by the country’s government, Flora and Fauna International have reported.

Situated in the north-eastern Andaman Sea the archipelago comprises over 800 islands of white sandy beaches and coral reefs teeming with a diverse array of marine life.

Scientific surveys of the area have revealed around 287 species of coral and 365 reef fish species, as well as reefs rich in echinoderms, crustaceans, molluscs and sponges.

The MPA has been proposed in a bid to conserve this unique biodiversity from the serious threats it faces, such as overfishing, destructive fishing methods, and to support sustainable fisheries.

Frank Momberg, FFI Myanmar Programme Director said, “Myanmar’s fisheries resources have declined dramatically over the last decade. However, by establishing a marine protected area network Myanmar will protect important nursery grounds for fish, coral reef and mangrove areas critical to maintaining the livelihood of coastal fishing communities and the fishing industry.”

Rohingya Muslims persecuted in Burma


This video is called Myanmar’s radical monk targets interfaith marriage; by ABC Australia.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Myanmar: Documents expose government-sanctioned persecution of Rohingya Muslims

Tuesday 25th February 2014

Leaked official papers show attempts to curb Rohingya people’s human rights

Official documents directly implicate Myanmar’s government in abusive and discriminatory policies targeting Rohingya Muslims, the Fortify Rights group said yesterday.

Executive director Matthew Smith said dozens of leaked papers reveal restrictions on Rohingya people’s right to travel, practice religion, marry, have a family and even repair their homes.

“It represents a level of planning and knowledge among Myanmar authorities that raises abuses to the threshold of crimes against humanity,” said Mr Smith.

“These abuses have been carried out for years with complete impunity.”

About 280 people have been killed since Myanmar began its transition to democracy, most of them Rohingya attacked by Buddhist mobs.

Another 140,000 have been forced to flee their homes.

Confidential documents obtained by Fortify Rights reveal that official orders issued by Rakhine State authorities from 1993 to 2008 outline consistent policies restricting Rohingya.

Some regional orders were dated 1993, 2005 and 2008.

However, they have also been discussed on the record since 2011, the group said, adding that to the best of its knowledge almost all the policies are still in place and enforced.

It says the orders laid the groundwork for a two-child policy enforced in Maungdaw and Buthidaung townships, requiring Rohingya “who have permission to marry” to “limit the number of children, in order to control the birth rate.”One document gives detailed instructions to officials to confirm women are the real mothers of infants, forcing them to publicly breastfeed if it’s suspected they are trying to claim others’ children as their own.

Hey everyone, Buddhists can be fundamentalists too! Here.

Myanmar hoolock gibbons, new research


This video is called Conservation of the Eastern Hoolock Gibbon.

By Frank Momberg today:

Myanmar critical for hoolock gibbon conservation

December 18, 2013

A comprehensive conservation status review of hoolock gibbons in Myanmar has been published by Fauna & Fauna International (FFI), People Resources and Conservation Foundation (PRCF) and Biodiversity and Nature Conservation Association (BANCA).

The review, issued through the Gibbon Conservation Alliance, involved three years of nationwide field surveys and threat assessments. Prior to this research, action was constrained by a lack of data on their distribution, population size and threats.

The results of the new research show serious threats and concludes that Myanmar is critical for the survival of both the Eastern and the Western hoolock gibbon. While Western hoolock gibbon populations in India and Bangladesh are severely fragmented, and even more so the Eastern hoolock populations in China. With 99.9% of Eastern and at least 90% of the Western hoolock total population, Myanmar offers the best chance of survival for both species.

To protect at least one important site for the conservation of each species, FFI, PRCF and BANCA have initiated a community based Western Hoolock Gibbon Project in Pauk Sa Mountain, Rhakine Yoma Range and a collaborative conservation project at Indawgyi Wildlife Sanctuary, in partnership with the Myanmar Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry. At both sides we have been able to reduce habitat fragmentation and hunting through active engagement of local communities in the protection of gibbons and by providing support for alternative livelihoods.

Anti-Muslim violence in Burma


This video is called Burma’s Bin Laden, the Buddhist monk who fuels hatred.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Buildings torched in anti-Muslim riot

Sunday 25 August 2013

Fresh sectarian violence broke out in north-western Myanmar late on Saturday when Buddhist mobs burned down dozens of buildings following claims that a young woman had been sexually assaulted by a Muslim.

Hundreds of people took part in the riot on the outskirts of Kantbalu.

A crowd surrounded the police station demanding that the suspect be handed over, said a police officer from the area.

When police refused to hand over the prisoner the mob started setting buildings on fire, he said, and about 35 houses and 12 shops were destroyed.

Elsewhere hundreds of Muslims, who have been trapped in nearby ghettos after Buddhist mobs torched their homes last year, were moved to a camp for internally displaced people.

More than 5,700 people have been living in Aung Mingalar, a small Muslim quarter of Sittwe town, with police bearing assault rifles blocking entry and exit.

England: Muslims in an Essex town were left “very saddened” after the suspected anti-Islam arson of their centre on Sunday night: here.