George Harrison Beatle tree killed by beetles


This video from the USA says about itself:

L.A. Gently Weeps As George Harrison Tree Is Felled By Beetles

22 July 2014

A local official said on Tuesday that a tree planted in memorial to late Beatles guitarist George Harrison following his death in Los Angeles in 2001 has been killed by bark beetles amid California’s epic drought. The pine tree, which was dedicated with a plaque to Harrison at the head of a hiking trail in the city’s Griffith Park, was among a number of trees that have succumbed to the beetles this year. City Councilman, Tom LaBonge said he expects to see a new tree planted in remembrance of Harrison in the fall.

From the Los Angeles Times in the USA:

George Harrison Memorial Tree killed … by beetles; replanting due

By Randy Lewis

July 21, 2014

In the truth is stranger than fiction department, Los Angeles Councilman Tom LaBonge, whose district includes Griffith Park, told Pop & Hiss over the weekend that the pine tree planted in 2004 near Griffith Observatory in memory of George Harrison will be replanted shortly because the original tree died as the result of an insect infestation.

Yes, the George Harrison Tree was killed by beetles.

Except for the loss of tree life, Harrison likely would have been amused at the irony. He once said his biggest break in life was getting into the Beatles; his second biggest was getting out.

The sapling went in, unobtrusively, near the observatory with a small plaque at the base to commemorate the former Beatle, who died in 2001, because he spent his final days in Los Angeles and because he was an avid gardener for much of his adult life.

Britain’s oil beetles endangered


This video is about oil beetles in Britain.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

A Hard Day’s Night for beetles

Wednesday 14 March 2012

Britain’s “Fab Four” oil beetle species have been having a hard day’s night.

Wildlife charity Buglife announced on Wednesday that numbers of black, violet, rugged and short-necked oil beetles are diving like a yellow submarine.

The beetles’ habitats have been blighted by changes to the countryside. Naturalists are calling for people to help survey numbers.

So search the long and winding roads and strawberry fields for signs of the bugs and get involved in the national oil beetle hunt at www.buglife.org.uk