Bolivia extradites Argentine dictatorship torture suspect


This video from the USA says about itself:

Argentine Torture Survivor Tells of Her Struggle to Bring Her Torturers to Justice

12 November 2010

Democracy Now! speak with Patricia Isasa, a torture survivor from Argentina’s military dictatorship. She was a 16-year old student union organizer in 1976 when she was kidnapped by police and soldiers. She was tortured and held prisoner without trial for two-and-a-half years at one of the 585 clandestine detention and torture centers set up during the dictatorship. After a long legal battle to bring her torturers to justice, six of her nine torturers were recently sentenced to prison.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Bolivia deports former Argentine army captain over role in military junta’s dirty war

Tuesday 12th August 2014

Bolivia has deported an Argentine ex-army officer convicted of serious rights abuses during the “dirty war” carried out by his country’s 1976-83 military regime.

Jorge Horacio Paez Senestrari “was handed over to authorities of his country” on the border with Argentina, Bolivian Interior Minister Jorge Perez said yesterday.

Mr Perez said that Paez Senestrari — an infantry captain posted in the Argentine town of San Juan during the dictatorship — was captured on Friday morning in the Bolivian city of Santa Cruz.

Then Interior Ministry said there was an Interpol red notice for his arrest.

An Argentinian court had sentenced Paez Senestrari in absentia to 25 years on charges of “aggravated homicide, violation of domicile and torture.”

An estimated 30,000 people were killed or abducted and presumed killed under Argentina’s military dictatorship.

In 2012, former dictators Jorge Videla and Reynaldo Bignone were sentenced to lengthy prison terms for abuses in office.

Argentine grandmother finds stolen grandson after 37 years


This video says about itself:

Mothers of Plaza de Mayo: 35 years of struggle

30 April 2012

Today, April 30, it is the 35th anniversary of the founding of the organization Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, which has begun the search for the people who were reported missing during Argentina’s military dictatorship (1976-1983). In their struggle, these mothers have been accompanied by relatives of missing persons and other organizations such as the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo among others.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain today:

ARGENTINA: Estela Carlotto, the 83-year-old leader of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo group, which has fought to find babies stolen during the 1976-1983 “dirty war,” finally found her long-lost grandson yesterday.

Her daughter, left-wing activist Laura Carlotto, was three months pregnant when she was taken to a prison camp in 1977.

She gave birth while in captivity but was killed two months after her son was born.

More about this: here. And here.

New biosphere reserve in Argentina


This video is called Península Valdés, Argentina.

From Wildlife Extra:

A vast coastal wildlife haven in Argentina declared a Biosphere Reserve

Four million acres of wildlife-rich land in southern Argentina has been declared a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.

Península Valdés is situated on a rugged peninsula on the Atlantic coast of Patagonia in the Chubut Province, and is teeming with wildlife.

It has the largest breeding colony of southern elephant seals in South America and supports more than 70,000 pairs of Magellanic penguins, over 10,000 South American sea lions, cormorants, gulls, terns, and nearly 4,000 southern right whales. On land the peninsula sustains over 4,000 guanacos and some of the highest densities of maras and Darwin’s rheas in Patagonia.

The new reserve includes a previously unprotected area known as Punta Ninfas, where large numbers of elephant seals, South American sea lions, imperial cormorants, terns and Magellanic penguins live.

This area is under threat from three nearby large cities and uncontrolled access by people using off-road vehicles. The new Biosphere designation draws attention to the urgent need for ensuring the protection of wildlife here.

“Península Valdés is one of the great natural wonders of Latin America with greater concentrations of wildlife than any other area on the entire coast of Patagonia,” said WCS President and CEO Cristián Samper.

“Making this incredible area region a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve is the culmination of years of hard work by many great partners.”

Diplodocid dinosaur discovery in Argentina


This video is called Long-Necked Dinosaur Found In Argentina.

From Associated Press:

Dinosaur find tests theories on extinctions

By MICHAEL WARREN

Saturday, June 14, 2014 8:27pm

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina – Dinosaur fossils found in Patagonia provide the first evidence that long-necked, whip-tailed diplodocid sauropods survived well beyond the Jurassic period, when they were thought to have gone extinct, Argentine paleontologists said.

Pablo Gallina, a researcher at Buenos Aires’ Maimonides University, described the find as the first definitive evidence that diplodocids reached South America and the most recent geologic record of this branch of sauropod anywhere.

“It was a surprise, because the first remains we found were very deteriorated, and we didn’t think much of them, but later through careful laboratory work, cleaning rock from the bones, we could see that they were from a diplodocid, something unthinkable for South America.”

Gallina’s team says the fossils show that diplodocids roamed South America during the early Cretaceous era, well after scientists thought these kinds of dinosaurs became extinct. They also suggest that the diplodocid clade, or family group, evolved from other dinosaurs before the Earth’s continents split apart, which is earlier than previously thought.

“Diplodocids were never certainly recognized from the Cretaceous or in any other southern land mass besides Africa,” the authors wrote. “The new discovery represents the first record of a diplodocid for South America and the stratigraphically youngest record of this clade anywhere.”

Explaining the find after the conclusions were published in the PLOS ONE scientific journal, they said the eight vertebrae they recovered belong to a new species they named “Leinkupal laticauda.” That’s a combination of native Mapuche words for “vanishing” and “family,” and Latin words for “wide” and “tail.”

The remains were found in rocky outcrops of the “Bajada Colorada,” a Cretaceous-era formation south of the town of Picun Leufu in Neuquen province.

Paleobiologist Paul Upchurch at University College London, a sauropod expert who was not involved in the study, said it suggests that not all diplodocids succumbed to a mass extinction about 140 million years ago at the end of the Jurassic period.

“Here’s evidence that one or two groups got through. Rather than a total extinction, that it was devastating, but it didn’t completely kill them off,” Upchurch said.

As for the conclusion that the South American find shows diplodocids evolved from a common ancestor earlier than previously thought, Upchurch said “there’s certainly a possibility that this would push the origin back a bit,” given that Africa and South America separated during the Jurassic period. “I’ve been arguing for a long time that these species developed in the middle Jurassic, so for me this isn’t a problem, but others think it happened a bit later,” Upchurch said.

Upchurch also expressed confidence in the claim of a new species, saying “we know enough about sauropods now to get a fairly good idea of what stands out as a diagnosing feature for a new species.”

The research was partly funded by The Jurassic Foundation, formed by producers of the Jurassic Park films.

Sebastian Apesteguia, paleontology director at Maimonides University, noted that the characters in Jurassic Park II ride a motorcycle under a diplodocid’s legs.

“Until now the diplodocids were thought to be North American dinosaurs. They were the classic dinosaurs from all the Hollywood movies,” he said.