Bolivia extradites Argentine dictatorship torture suspect


This video from the USA says about itself:

Argentine Torture Survivor Tells of Her Struggle to Bring Her Torturers to Justice

12 November 2010

Democracy Now! speak with Patricia Isasa, a torture survivor from Argentina’s military dictatorship. She was a 16-year old student union organizer in 1976 when she was kidnapped by police and soldiers. She was tortured and held prisoner without trial for two-and-a-half years at one of the 585 clandestine detention and torture centers set up during the dictatorship. After a long legal battle to bring her torturers to justice, six of her nine torturers were recently sentenced to prison.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Bolivia deports former Argentine army captain over role in military junta’s dirty war

Tuesday 12th August 2014

Bolivia has deported an Argentine ex-army officer convicted of serious rights abuses during the “dirty war” carried out by his country’s 1976-83 military regime.

Jorge Horacio Paez Senestrari “was handed over to authorities of his country” on the border with Argentina, Bolivian Interior Minister Jorge Perez said yesterday.

Mr Perez said that Paez Senestrari — an infantry captain posted in the Argentine town of San Juan during the dictatorship — was captured on Friday morning in the Bolivian city of Santa Cruz.

Then Interior Ministry said there was an Interpol red notice for his arrest.

An Argentinian court had sentenced Paez Senestrari in absentia to 25 years on charges of “aggravated homicide, violation of domicile and torture.”

An estimated 30,000 people were killed or abducted and presumed killed under Argentina’s military dictatorship.

In 2012, former dictators Jorge Videla and Reynaldo Bignone were sentenced to lengthy prison terms for abuses in office.

Argentine grandmother finds stolen grandson after 37 years


This video says about itself:

Mothers of Plaza de Mayo: 35 years of struggle

30 April 2012

Today, April 30, it is the 35th anniversary of the founding of the organization Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, which has begun the search for the people who were reported missing during Argentina’s military dictatorship (1976-1983). In their struggle, these mothers have been accompanied by relatives of missing persons and other organizations such as the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo among others.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain today:

ARGENTINA: Estela Carlotto, the 83-year-old leader of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo group, which has fought to find babies stolen during the 1976-1983 “dirty war,” finally found her long-lost grandson yesterday.

Her daughter, left-wing activist Laura Carlotto, was three months pregnant when she was taken to a prison camp in 1977.

She gave birth while in captivity but was killed two months after her son was born.

More about this: here. And here.

New biosphere reserve in Argentina


This video is called Península Valdés, Argentina.

From Wildlife Extra:

A vast coastal wildlife haven in Argentina declared a Biosphere Reserve

Four million acres of wildlife-rich land in southern Argentina has been declared a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.

Península Valdés is situated on a rugged peninsula on the Atlantic coast of Patagonia in the Chubut Province, and is teeming with wildlife.

It has the largest breeding colony of southern elephant seals in South America and supports more than 70,000 pairs of Magellanic penguins, over 10,000 South American sea lions, cormorants, gulls, terns, and nearly 4,000 southern right whales. On land the peninsula sustains over 4,000 guanacos and some of the highest densities of maras and Darwin’s rheas in Patagonia.

The new reserve includes a previously unprotected area known as Punta Ninfas, where large numbers of elephant seals, South American sea lions, imperial cormorants, terns and Magellanic penguins live.

This area is under threat from three nearby large cities and uncontrolled access by people using off-road vehicles. The new Biosphere designation draws attention to the urgent need for ensuring the protection of wildlife here.

“Península Valdés is one of the great natural wonders of Latin America with greater concentrations of wildlife than any other area on the entire coast of Patagonia,” said WCS President and CEO Cristián Samper.

“Making this incredible area region a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve is the culmination of years of hard work by many great partners.”

Diplodocid dinosaur discovery in Argentina


This video is called Long-Necked Dinosaur Found In Argentina.

From Associated Press:

Dinosaur find tests theories on extinctions

By MICHAEL WARREN

Saturday, June 14, 2014 8:27pm

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina – Dinosaur fossils found in Patagonia provide the first evidence that long-necked, whip-tailed diplodocid sauropods survived well beyond the Jurassic period, when they were thought to have gone extinct, Argentine paleontologists said.

Pablo Gallina, a researcher at Buenos Aires’ Maimonides University, described the find as the first definitive evidence that diplodocids reached South America and the most recent geologic record of this branch of sauropod anywhere.

“It was a surprise, because the first remains we found were very deteriorated, and we didn’t think much of them, but later through careful laboratory work, cleaning rock from the bones, we could see that they were from a diplodocid, something unthinkable for South America.”

Gallina’s team says the fossils show that diplodocids roamed South America during the early Cretaceous era, well after scientists thought these kinds of dinosaurs became extinct. They also suggest that the diplodocid clade, or family group, evolved from other dinosaurs before the Earth’s continents split apart, which is earlier than previously thought.

“Diplodocids were never certainly recognized from the Cretaceous or in any other southern land mass besides Africa,” the authors wrote. “The new discovery represents the first record of a diplodocid for South America and the stratigraphically youngest record of this clade anywhere.”

Explaining the find after the conclusions were published in the PLOS ONE scientific journal, they said the eight vertebrae they recovered belong to a new species they named “Leinkupal laticauda.” That’s a combination of native Mapuche words for “vanishing” and “family,” and Latin words for “wide” and “tail.”

The remains were found in rocky outcrops of the “Bajada Colorada,” a Cretaceous-era formation south of the town of Picun Leufu in Neuquen province.

Paleobiologist Paul Upchurch at University College London, a sauropod expert who was not involved in the study, said it suggests that not all diplodocids succumbed to a mass extinction about 140 million years ago at the end of the Jurassic period.

“Here’s evidence that one or two groups got through. Rather than a total extinction, that it was devastating, but it didn’t completely kill them off,” Upchurch said.

As for the conclusion that the South American find shows diplodocids evolved from a common ancestor earlier than previously thought, Upchurch said “there’s certainly a possibility that this would push the origin back a bit,” given that Africa and South America separated during the Jurassic period. “I’ve been arguing for a long time that these species developed in the middle Jurassic, so for me this isn’t a problem, but others think it happened a bit later,” Upchurch said.

Upchurch also expressed confidence in the claim of a new species, saying “we know enough about sauropods now to get a fairly good idea of what stands out as a diagnosing feature for a new species.”

The research was partly funded by The Jurassic Foundation, formed by producers of the Jurassic Park films.

Sebastian Apesteguia, paleontology director at Maimonides University, noted that the characters in Jurassic Park II ride a motorcycle under a diplodocid’s legs.

“Until now the diplodocids were thought to be North American dinosaurs. They were the classic dinosaurs from all the Hollywood movies,” he said.

Biggest dinosaur ever discovered in Argentina?


This video says about itself:

16 May 2014

Palaeontologists in Argentina believe they have found bones belonging to the heaviest dinosaur to ever have walked the Earth – which had an estimated body mass of 77 tonnes.

They found bones belonging to seven individuals from a new species of titanosaur, which has yet to be named – and calculated the approximate size of the largest one by measuring the diameter of the femur and the humerus bones.

In this video, Dr Diego Pol explains how the measuring process works.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain:

Is this the biggest dinosaur ever discovered? Scientists uncover 80-tonne herbivore weighing the same as 14 elephants

May 17, 2014 08:50

By Richard Hartley-Parkinson

Titanosaur bones that are around 95 million years old were discovered in a desert in Patagonia

Scientists believe they have discovered dinosaur bones belonging to the largest creature that ever existed.

Discovered in Argentina, paleontologists estimate that it weighed 80 tonnes – the equivalent of 14 African elephants.

It was discovered by a farm worker in the desert 135 miles from Trelew, Patagonia.

Paleontologists from the Museum of Palaentology are now examining the herbivorous titanosaur which existed in the Cretaceous period and the bones are believed to be 95 million years old.

Seven huge dinosaurs were discovered at the site and the bones are described as being in a remarkable state of preservation.

They would have had a small skull but a very long neck and tail.

“It’s like two semi trucks, one after another, and the equivalent of more than 14 African elephants together in weight,” says José Luis Carballido, the dinosaur specialist in charge of the study.

“Such dimensions put the focus on the extent to which these animals may have grown. It’s a real paleontological treasure,” he added.

Because the dinosaurs were found so close together, along with a number of carnivorous dinosaurs, it is believed that they may have died during a drought. It is possible that they died of dehydration or became stuck in the mud.

The carnivores may have ended up there to feed on the flesh of the huge dinosaurs.

Further analysis of the place where they were found suggests that the area was different to how it looks today.

Rather than a dry, arid land, it is likely that there were trees and and a wide variety of plant-life.

Is it reallt the biggest dinosaur? Here.

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Argentine microbiologist, critic of Monsanto, dies


This video says about itself:

Andres Carrasco – Results of a Case Study of Glyphosate/Roundup

2 July 2012

Andres Carrasco, MD, is head of the Molecular Embryology Laboratory at University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and chief scientist at the National Council for Science and Technology (CONICET), Argentina.

The Carrasco laboratory investigates glyphosate/Roundup herbicide and birth defects

Carrasco’s findings gave scientific credibility to reports of people in Argentina who claimed escalating rates of birth defects and cancers after the introduction of genetically modified soy, which is engineered to tolerate being sprayed with huge amounts of glyphosate.

In June 2011, Earth Open Source published a report by a group of international scientists, “Roundup and birth defects: Is the public being kept in the dark?” which examined the original approval documents for glyphosate and found that industry’s own studies from as long ago as the 1980s-1990s (including some commissioned by Monsanto) showed that glyphosate causes birth defects in laboratory animals, specifically rabbits and rats.

From Associated Press today:

Argentine scientist who challenged Monsanto dies

12 minutes ago by Michael Warren

Dr. Andres Carrasco, an Argentine neuroscientist who challenged pesticide regulators to re-examine one of the world’s most widely used weed killers, has died. He was 67.

Argentina’s national science council announced Carrasco’s death on Saturday. He had been in declining health.

Carrasco, a molecular biologist at the University of Buenos Aires and past-president of Argentina’s CONICET science council, was a widely published expert in embryonic development whose work focused on how neurotransmitters affect genetic expression in vertebrates. But none of his research generated as much controversy as his 2010 study on glyphosate, which became a major public relations challenge for the St. Louis, Missouri-based Monsanto Company.

Glyphosate is the key ingredient in Monsanto‘s Roundup brand of pesticides, which have combined with genetically modified “Roundup-Ready” plants to dramatically increase the spread of industrial agriculture around the world. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other regulators have labeled it reasonably safe to use if applied properly. But few countries enforce pesticide rules as rigorously as the United States, and farming’s spread has increasingly exposed people to glyphosate and other chemicals.

Carrasco, principal investigator at his university’s Cellular Biology and Neuroscience Institute, told The Associated Press in a 2013 interview that he had heard reports of increasing birth defects in farming communities after genetically modified crops were approved for use in Argentina, and so decided to test the impact of glyphosate on frog and chicken embryos in his laboratory.

His team’s study, published in the peer-reviewed Chemical Research in Toxicology journal, found that injecting very low doses of glyphosate into embryos can change levels of retinoic acid, causing the same sort of spinal defects that doctors are increasingly registering in communities where farm chemicals are ubiquitous. Retinoic acid, a form of vitamin A, is fundamental for keeping cancers in check and triggering genetic expression, the process by which embryonic cells develop into organs and limbs.

“If it’s possible to reproduce this in a laboratory, surely what is happening in the field is much worse,” Carrasco told the AP. “And if it’s much worse, and we suspect that it is, what we have to do is put this under a magnifying glass.”

ARGENTINIAN molecular biologist Andres Carrasco, whose work on the pesticide glyphosate became a major headache for biotechnology conglomerate Monsanto, died this weekend aged 67: here.

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