Anne Frank’s toys rediscovered


Anne Frank playing with marbles, photo Anne Frank Stichting / Anne Frank Fonds

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Marbles of Anne Frank rediscovered

Update: Monday, 3 Feb 2014, 18:48

Almost seventy years after the Second World War toys owned by Anne Frank have resurfaced. A neighbour of the Frank Family on the Merwedeplein in Amsterdam brought a can with Anne‘s marbles to the Anne Frank House.

The girl next door, the now 83-year-old Toosje Kupers, says she got the marbles when it became clear that Anne and her family had to hide. She says she had never realized that the toys would be so valuable for the Anne Frank House.

The marbles are on display at an exhibition in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam which the king will open tomorrow.

See also here. And here.

Anne Frank's marbles

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Anne Frank’s collected works published


This video from the Netherlands is called Trailer YouTube-channel Anne Frank House.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

New letters in Anne Frank book

Tuesday 12 Nov 2013, 19:12 (Update: 12/11/13, 19:29)

In Amsterdam the collected works of Anne Frank have been presented. In this book, for the first time the different versions of her diary, stories, letters and photos have been brought together.

In the book are letters which had never been published before. Anne‘s ‘Egypt Diary’ is included as well. Anne cut pictures from a magazine and stuck them in a notebook.

Minister Bussemaker accepted the first copy. She called the diary “the most important war document in the world. Anne Frank has managed to keep the memory of the Second World War alive”.

Anne Frank censorship attempt fails


From the New York Daily News in the USA:

May 13, 2013 11:24 AM

School officials in Northville, Mich., refuse to ban unedited version of Anne Frank’s diary

BY Taylor Malmsheimer

Anne Frank's diary

Last month, a mother in Northville, Mich., filed a formal complaint against her daughter’s school district, stating that the unedited version of “The Diary of a Young Girl: Anne Frank” contained “pornographic” passages that were inappropriate for her seventh grade daughter and her classmates.

The Northville Patch reports that following a deliberation by a review committee, Northville Public School officials have decided not to remove the definitive edition of Anne Frank’s diary from its middle school’s reading options.

Assistant superintendent for instructional services Robert Behnke wrote a letter to the community regarding the school’s decision, stating that the committee worried that removing the book would constitute as censorship.

“The committee felt strongly that a decision to remove the use of ‘Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl — The Definitive Edition’ as a choice within this larger unit of study would effectively impose situational censorship by eliminating the opportunity for the deeper study afforded by this edition,” Behnke wrote.

The committee, which consisted of elementary, middle school and district administrators as well as two middle school English teachers and two parents in the district, also suggested the district should better communicate information about the units of study in middle school literature classes, Behnke said. It suggested that when possible, middle school English classes should provide parents with booklists that can be reviewed by parents before students make a selection.

The school’s decision is a welcome hiatus from a recent troubling trend, in which parents and teachers request that various books be banned from school libraries and reading lists in communities across the country.

Anne Frank rose in Britain for first time


Anne Frank rose

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Anne Frank rose planted in Britain for first time

Thursday 26 January 2012

The first rose named after 15-year-old Holocaust victim Anne Frank to be planted in Britain was unveiled today on the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day.

Farhad Vahidi, an Iranian refugee who is seeking asylum in Britain with his family, planted the rose at the Jewish Museum garden in Manchester.

It was part of a Holocaust Memorial Day event linked with Manchester-based Refugee and Asylum Seeker Participatory Action Research.

The flower, grafted from a rose made in the year of Anne’s birth in 1929 and another made in the year of her death, was created in Europe in 1960.

Anne was born in Germany but lived most of her life in the Netherlands. Her diary detailing her life under nazi occupation in World War II gained posthumous international fame.

Mormon Baptism Targets Anne Frank — Again: here.

Spare Us From Petty Political Hacks: A South Florida Holocaust Center Under Siege: here.

Exhibition on Anne Frank’s sister


Margot Frank

From the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, the Netherlands:

New exhibition

Amsterdam, 3/15/2011

Margot Frank, born on 16 February 1926, steps out of the shadow of her world-famous sister Anne with an exhibition especially devoted to her in the Anne Frank House. The exhibition ‘Margot, Anne’s sister’ was opened today by friends and classmates of Margot Frank. At the opening ceremony Jetteke Frijda spoke of her close friendship with Margot, and expressed her appreciation of the exhibition being shown: “All the attention for Anne is a wonderful thing, but Margot should be mentioned too.”

Margot, Anne’s sister

Anne’s sister Margot is a quiet, serious girl who enjoys studying

The exhibition, which can be seen in the Anne Frank House until 15 September, sketches an image of Margot with the use of personal film testimony and other historical evidence, photos, letters and artefacts.

Good, kind and clever

“Margot doesn’t need [any upbringing] since she’s naturally good, kind and clever”, wrote Anne in her diary on 27 September 1942. The exhibition confirms this image of Margot – kind, clever and attractive – and also highlights her sporting, sociable and sensitive side. For example, the exhibition includes images of Margot skiing and skating, her swimming certificate and rowing medal, a diary by Jetteke Frijda with a personal message from Margot, letters from Margot, and more. Quotations from parents Otto and Edith Frank and sister Anne, together with film testimony from childhood friends, give a character sketch of Margot.

Sister

It is the first time that an exhibition has been especially devoted to Margot Frank. Though small in scale, it offers visitors the opportunity to get to know Anne’s sister better. But visitors will learn less about Margot’s inner life. Unlike Anne, she was an introverted, private person. The sisters, different as they were, nevertheless had a close bond. In the exhibition, eyewitness Bloeme Evers tells of their closeness in the Westerbork transit camp. The sisters remained together to the end. In March 1945 Margot died, aged 19, in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, a few days before Anne.

Anne Frank tree update, August 2011: here.

Anne Frank’s helper Miep Gies dies


This video is called Miep Gies: Giving Anne’s diary to her father.

On Monday evening 11 January, Miep Gies, the helper of Anne Frank when she hid during World War II, died after a brief illness. She was 100 years of age.

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Anne Frank born 80 years ago


From Democracy NOW! in the USA, with (another) video:

80th Anniversary of Anne Frank’s Birth: How a 13-Year-Old Girl Became the Defining Voice of the Nazi Holocaust

Events are being held today around the world to mark what would have been Anne Frank’s eightieth birthday. In Amsterdam, the Anne Frank House museum has announced it will put her diaries on permanent display. Anne Frank died at the age of fifteen of typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in the spring of 1945, just weeks before the concentration camp was liberated. Her diary was first published in 1947 and has since become one of the most widely read books in the world. We play a reading from the Anne Frank Diary Recording Project.

Anne Frank tree: here.

Reprieve for Anne Frank tree in Amsterdam


This is a video about the Anne Frank tree.

From Dutch NOS TV:

Anne Frank tree will not be cut down

The Anne Frank tree will definitely not be cut down. The horse chestnut tree at which Anne Frank looked from the Achterhuis [Secret Annexe] will stay there for at least five years. There will be a special steel construction around the tree, which is affected by an aggressive fungus.

The owner of the Anne Frank tree agrees with the agreements. Earlier, the local authority and the owner wanted to cut down the chestnut tree, as there is a risk of it falling down.

See also here.

Back in 2010 the world famous Anne Frank chestnut tree had blown over and broke. In an effort to save something of this tree mentioned in Anne Frank’s diary, branches were take in order to try and grow saplings: here.

Anne Frank tree will be cut down next Wednesday


This is a Dutch video about Anne Frank’s tree.

Dutch NOS TV writes:

The Anne Frank tree in Amsterdam will be cut down next Wednesday after all.

For a long time, it has been tried to save this horse chestnut tree. However, it is too sick, and dangerous to its surroundings. Anne Frank used to look at that tree from the secret annexe.

Or maybe the tree can stay after all, as later media updates said?