United States Iraq Veterans Against the War


This video from the USA says about itself:

Iraq Veterans Against the War: Decade-Old Group Grapples with New War, PTSD Epidemic, VA Failures

3 October 2014

Ten years ago, six members of the U.S. military came together to break their silence over what they had witnessed during the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. They banded together and formed the organization Iraq Veterans Against the War, or IVAW. Over time, they gathered like-minded veterans across the United States to form a contemporary GI resistance movement. Celebrated its tenth anniversary, IVAW members say it is a bittersweet moment as the United States has resumed bombing in Iraq.

Today, IVAW chapters are in 48 states and numerous bases overseas. The group has called for reparations for the people of Iraq and Afghanistan — for both human and infrastructural damages caused by the U.S.-led invasion. They have also called for adequate healthcare to be provided at VA facilities, including mental healthcare, for all returning veterans. We host a roundtable with three IVAW members: co-founder Kelly Dougherty, who was deployed to Kuwait and Iraq from 2003-2004; Brock McIntosh, who served in Afghanistan and applied for conscientious objector status; and Scott Olsen, a former marine who served two tours in Iraq and was critically wounded after being shot in the head by a police projectile at an Occupy Oakland protest.

Take a moment to see all of the Democracy Now! reports on Iraq Veterans Against the War in our archive.

Afghans protest against NATO killing civilians


This video says about itself:

Afghan Officials Say Air Strike Killed Civilians, NATO Says ‘enemy’

13 October 2014

An Afghan official said a NATO air strike killed seven civilians in the country’s east, including a nine-year-old child, but the international coalition said on Monday the strike killed eight militants who had fired on its forces. …

The deputy governor of Paktia province, Abdul Wali Sahi, said villagers brought seven bodies from the Udkey area of Gardez city to the provincial capital, saying they were all civilians killed in an air strike.

Sahi said an investigation has been launched, but that initial reports suggested the villagers were gathering firewood on a mountainside for the upcoming winter on Sunday when they were fired on.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Paktia villagers in Afghanistan demand justice after Nato air strike

Tuesday 14th October 2014

Villagers protested at Afghanistan’s Paktia province governor’s office yesterday, saying that a Nato air strike had killed seven civilians.

Nato claimed that Sunday night’s “precision strike” had killed “eight armed enemy combatants.”

But hundreds of villagers brought seven bodies — including one of a 12-year-old boy — to the governor’s office, claiming that all had been collecting firewood before the strike that injured an eighth man.

“From the evidence it seems that all seven who have been killed in the air strike of the coalition forces are civilians, but this needs to be investigated more to find out why and how this incident has happened,” said deputy governor Abdul Wali Sahee.

Afghan civilians killed again


This 13 October 2014 video is called Afghan official says NATO airstrike killed civilians.

After 13 years, President Obama, ‘time to end our endless war in Afghanistan’. As ‘longest war’ hits another milestone, human costs continue to rise: here.

Afghan war soldiers’ survivors denounce war


This music video from England is called Jimmy Cliff at Glastonbury 2011 singing We Don’t Want Another Vietnam in Afghanistan.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Families of soldiers who died in Afghanistan say their loved ones lost their lives for nothing

“It’s been a total waste of British lives, Afghan lives, American lives,” said the grandmother of a soldier who died in action

Kashmira Gander

Friday 03 October 2014

As David Cameron visited Afghanistan and declared there was no prospect of UK troops returning to fight there, the families of soldiers killed in the conflict say it has all been for nothing.

Speaking to British troops at Camp Bastion, the Prime Minister thanked soldiers and acknowledged that the armed forces had paid a “very high price” for bringing “stability” to the country over the past 13 years.

But bereaved relatives have said that any improvement seen in the country would “come unglued”, and the lives of 400 British soldiers who died in the war have gone to waste.

Joan Humphreys, an outspoken campaigner against the war, lost her grandson in Afghanistan in 2009. The 69-year-old from Dundee said that British forces had not achieved anything in the Middle Eastern country.

Private Kevin Elliott, 24, of The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, died alongside Sergeant Stuart Millar, 40, in an explosion while on foot patrol in southern Helmand on August 31 2009.

“In my opinion we should never have been there in the first place. I don’t think we’ve achieved anything, I don’t think there’s an improvement,” she said, and added that while there appears to be an improvement in Kabul, nothing has changed in other areas.

And although families would always be proud of their loved ones, she said many felt they had “died for nothing”.

“I was very proud of my grandson but never proud of him being a soldier, never proud of his involvement in the military. I supported him, of course I did, but I wasn’t happy with him being there.”

She added that the Taliban remain, and Al Qaida is likely to return to the embattled country.

“It’s been a total waste of British lives, Afghan lives, American lives,” she said, and went on to criticise politicians who initiated the war, claiming they have forgotten that Britain is not the power it once was.

“We should just stay back and if the Americans want to go in, let them go ahead, but don’t put our servicemen in there.”

“We should never have been there and when people say it’s a job well done, it’s just unbelievably crass. There’s no consideration for the families.”

Tony Philippson’s Paratrooper son Captain James Philippson died in a firefight in June 2006, making him one of the first British soldiers to die in the conflict. He echoed Mrs Humphrey’s sentiments, and said that while his son wanted to fight in Afghanistan, he never believed the mission would succeed.

“Though my son wouldn’t have missed going there for the world, he didn’t believe for one minute it was either worth doing or that we would succeed,” said Mr Philippson, 73, from St Albans, Hertfordshire.

“But he wouldn’t miss it. He joined the Marines and then the Paras because that was where the action was.

“He knew it was for nothing but I couldn’t stop him from going because he wanted to do some soldiering. It was his decision, he was the one who was willing to take the risk.”

“He didn’t think it was worth doing, just simply because of the cost, of human life and in dollars and pounds.

“What have they achieved?” he asked. “For the moment they think they have achieved a lot, but they haven’t.“

He predicted that the small improvements made in Afghanistan, such as women being able to go to school, would “all come unglued in the end.”

Additional reporting by AP

In fact, schools were already closing down in Afghanistan in 2012. Even the talk about girls being able to go to school is and was basically not reality, but talk. War propagandists’ talk.

NATO airstrike, at least 11 Afghan civilians dead


This 2013 video is called NATO Airstrike Kills 11 Children Under 8 in Kunar, Afghanistan.

From Deutsche Welle in Germany today:

NATO airstrike kills at least 11 Afghan civilians

At least 11 Afghan civilians have been killed in a NATO airstrike targeting Taliban fighters in the eastern province of Kunar. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has condemned the attack “in the strongest terms.”

A NATO airstrike late on Tuesday in Kunar, one of the Afghanistan‘s most volatile provinces, killed 11 Afghan civilians and wounded another 12, local officials said on Wednesday.

Provincial police chief Abdul Habib Sayedkheli said the NATO airstrike in the district of Narang had been requested by Afghan soldiers and police after coming under attack from the Taliban.

Tensions

A statement from the Afghan presidential palace said President Hamid Karzai had condemned the attack “in the strongest terms.”

Civilian casualties caused by misguided NATO aircraft remain highly sensitive in Afghanistan, occasionally triggering street protests and heightening tensions between NATO and Karzai’s government.

According to Assiocated Press, the death toll is fourteen.