Rupert Murdoch quarrels with Australian Prime Minister Abbott


This video is called Berlusconi and Murdoch: Two Fascist Peas in the Pod?

Once upon a time, Rupert Murdoch and Italian fellow media mogul and politician Silvio Berlusconi were close friends. However, then a quarrel broke out about money in Italy.

This video fr0om the USA is called Rupert Murdoch Pressured Tony Blair Over Iraq. It says about itself:

18 June 2012

Rupert Murdoch joined in an “over-crude” attempt by US Republicans to force Tony Blair to accelerate British involvement in the Iraq war a week before a crucial House of Commons vote in 2003, according to the final volumes of Alastair Campbell’s government diaries. In another blow to the media mogul, who told the Leveson inquiry that he had never tried to influence any prime minister, Campbell’s diary says Murdoch warned Blair in a phone call of the dangers of a delay in Iraq.”

Once upon a time, Rupert Murdoch and British politician Tony Blair were close friends. Tony Blair became godfather to a Rupert Murdoch child. However, like in the film The Godfather, a conflict broke about; between Blair and Murdoch about Murdoch’s ex-wife.

Once upon a time, Rupert Murdoch and Australian politician Tony Abbott were close friends. However …

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Rupert Murdoch turns on golden boy Tony Abbott over Australian PM’s failure to show ‘courage and leadership’

Talk of climate change and a series of gaffes has left the premier vulnerable

Oliver Poole

Sunday 23 November 2014

Fourteen months ago, Rupert Murdoch‘s papers championed Tony Abbott as he headed for election victory to become Australia’s prime minister. Yesterday, that mutual admiration came to an abrupt end as the media baron’s most influential newspaper labelled him “languishing”, “looking flaky” and not “hard enough”.

An editorial in The Australian upbraided Mr Abbott for lacking an “authoritative voice” and failing to show “courage and leadership”. It said: “Mr Abbott must regroup, trust himself and speak with purpose. Right now his insipid default setting is losing the people.”

During the 2013 election campaign, the Murdoch press in Australia was accused of bias by Kevin Rudd, leader of the incumbent Labor Party. An analysis of coverage in Sydney’s Daily Telegraph by ABC’s Media Watch claimed that, in the first week of the election campaign, half of the paper’s 80 stories were slanted against the government, with none against the conservative opposition. Over the next two weeks, it said, 59 stories were against the government, while only four were slanted against the opposition. Just three stories were said to have been in favour of the government.

Australian broadcaster and journalist Mark Colvin described The Australian‘s attack as a “remarkable turnaround”.

“The portents for Mr Abbott as he approaches his second Christmas as prime minister look a lot less promising,” he said. “And when, in the same editorial, it asks, ‘Is Mr Abbott hard enough?’, The Australian has inevitably kindled speculation that Murdoch‘s editors may have a successor in mind,” Mr Colvin added. With two years until the next election, however, any major challenge to Mr Abbott’s leadership would be a surprise.

Before Mr Abbott entered politics, he worked as a journalist for The Australian and, to mark the paper’s 50th anniversary in July, he described it as Rupert Murdoch‘s “gift to our nation”. Mr Murdoch had previously hailed Mr Abbott as an “admirable, honest, principled man”.

The editorial came after the Australian prime minister said that climate change was an “important subject”, following talks with the French president François Hollande, last week. He had previously stated that, in his opinion, climate change was “absolute crap”.

Mr Abbott had faced pressure to place climate change on the agenda of the recent G20 meetings of world leaders in Brisbane.

Last week, Mr Abbott made the mistake of referring to China as Tasmania during a dinner with President Xi Jinping as he summed up the details of the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement. It was one of a number of gaffes during his tenure. In May, he was caught winking at a radio host in the middle of an interview when a phone-sex worker called into the programme. The incident was broadcast live by ABC.

‘British spies in child abuse cover-up’


This video from Britain is called Peter Watt and Simon Danczuk on Westminster child abuse inquiry.

From weekly The Observer in Britain:

Media ‘gagged over bid to report MP child sex cases

Security services accused of aiding Westminster paedophilia cover-up

Daniel Boffey, policy editor

Saturday 22 November 2014 11.33 GMT

The security services are facing questions over the cover-up of a Westminster paedophile ring as it emerged that files relating to official requests for media blackouts in the early 1980s were destroyed.

Two newspaper executives have told the Observer that their publications were issued with D-notices – warnings not to publish intelligence that might damage national security – when they sought to report on allegations of a powerful group of men engaging in child sex abuse in 1984. One executive said he had been accosted in his office by 15 uniformed and two non-uniformed police over a dossier on Westminster paedophiles passed to him by the former Labour cabinet minister Barbara Castle.

The other said that his newspaper had received a D-notice when a reporter sought to write about a police investigation into Elm Guest House, in southwest London, where a group of high-profile paedophiles was said to have operated and may have killed a child. Now it has emerged that these claims are impossible to verify or discount because the D-notice archives for that period “are not complete”.

Officials running the D-notice system, which works closely with MI5 and MI6 and the Ministry of Defence, said that files “going back beyond 20 years are not complete because files are reviewed and correspondence of a routine nature with no historical significance destroyed”.

Theresa May, home secretary, this month told the Commons that an official review into whether there had been a cover-up of the Home Office’s handling of child-abuse allegations in the 1980s had returned a verdict of “not proven”. The review, by Peter Wanless, the chief executive of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, was prompted by the discovery that 114 Home Office files related to child abuse in the 1980s had gone missing.

On Saturday night the Labour MP for Rochdale, Simon Danczuk, whose book Smile for the Camera exposed the child sex abuse of the late Liberal MP Cyril Smith, said it was a matter of deep concern that D-notice correspondence had also disappeared, presumed destroyed. D-notices to media outlets are rare, with just five sent in 2009 and 10 in 2010, according to a freedom of information response from Air Vice-Marshal Andrew Vallance, secretary of the defence, press and broadcasting advisory committee, which oversees the system.

Danczuk said: “There are clearly questions to be answered as to why these documents were destroyed. They issue very few of them – where was the need to destroy correspondence?

“It feels like just another example of key documents from that period going missing. We need to know more about what has happened. The journalists who have said that D-notices were issued are respected people with no reason to lie.”

The two journalists, Don Hale, the former editor of the Bury Messenger, and Hilton Tims, news editor of the Surrey Comet between 1980 and 1988, both recall their publications being issued with D-notices around 1984. Tims, a veteran of the Daily Mail and BBC, where he was head of publicity for the launch of colour TV, said that his chief reporter had informed him that a D-notice had been issued to him after he tried to report on a police investigation into events at Elm Guest House, where Smith is said to have been a regular visitor.

Tims, 82, said: “One of the reporters on routine calls to the police learned that there was something going down at the guest house in Barnes. It was paedophilia, although that wasn’t the fashionable phrase at the time, it was ‘knocking up young boys’, or something like that.

“The reporter was told that there were a number of high-profile people involved and they were getting boys from a care home in the Richmond area. So I put someone on to it, the chief reporter I think, to make inquiries. It was the following day that we had a D-notice slapped on us; the reporter came over and told me. It was the only time in my career.”

Hale, who was awarded an OBE for his successful campaign to overturn the murder conviction of Stephen Downing, a victim of one of the longest-known miscarriages of justice, said he was issued with a D-notice when editor of the Bury Messenger. He had been given a file by Castle, by then an MEP, which had details of a Home Office investigation into allegations made by the Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens of the existence of a Westminster paedophile ring. The files contained the name of 16 MPs said to be involved and another 40 who were supportive of the goals of the Paedophile Information Exchange, which sought to reduce the age of consent.

Hale said he asked the Home Office for guidance on the dossier and the progress of the investigation but was stonewalled.

Hale said: “Then shortly after Cyril Smith bullied his way into my office. I thought he was going to punch me. He was sweating and aggressive and wanted to take the files away, saying it was a load of nonsense and that Barbara Castle just had a bee in her bonnet about homosexuals. I refused to give him the files.

“The very next day two non-uniformed officers, about 15 uniformed officers and another non-uniformed person, who didn’t introduce himself, came to the office waving a D-notice and said that I would be damaging national security if I reported on the file.”

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part I, film review


This video from the USA is called The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 Final Trailer.

By Maria Duarte in Britain:

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part I (12A)

Directed by Francis Lawrence

4/5

THE BRUTAL Hunger Games are over and now the revolution against the totalitarian Capitol takes centrestage in this intelligent and thought-provoking third instalment of this franchise.

It’s fascinating to see the reluctant Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) being forced to embrace her destiny of becoming the leader and poster girl of the rebellion — the Mockingjay — in this virtually faithful adaptation of Suzanne Collins’s novel.

It picks up exactly where Catching Fire left off and in the process very cleverly explores the spin, manipulations and propaganda of war. It is compelling to watch how the rebellious Katniss is made camera-ready to star in propaganda videos to rally the rebels in other districts.

The transformation is carried out under the watchful eyes of the mysterious leader of District 13, President Coin (Julianne Moore), along with former Head Gamemaker and now one of the masterminds of the rebellion Plutarch Heavensbee (Philip Seymour Hoffman, in his final role).

They are aided by Katniss’s determination to save Peeta (Josh Hutcherson) who is being tortured and possibly brainwashed by President Snow (Donald Sutherland).

Lawrence is statuesque and awe-inspiring as Katniss as she obliterates her young counterparts on the screen. Her emotional transformation is extraordinary and moving.

Under Francis Lawrence’s skilled direction, this is a much darker and more menacing sequel in which the politics are even more riveting than the games themselves. Unfortunately we will have to wait till next year for what should be a nail-biting conclusion.