George Harrison Beatle tree killed by beetles


This video from the USA says about itself:

L.A. Gently Weeps As George Harrison Tree Is Felled By Beetles

22 July 2014

A local official said on Tuesday that a tree planted in memorial to late Beatles guitarist George Harrison following his death in Los Angeles in 2001 has been killed by bark beetles amid California’s epic drought. The pine tree, which was dedicated with a plaque to Harrison at the head of a hiking trail in the city’s Griffith Park, was among a number of trees that have succumbed to the beetles this year. City Councilman, Tom LaBonge said he expects to see a new tree planted in remembrance of Harrison in the fall.

From the Los Angeles Times in the USA:

George Harrison Memorial Tree killed … by beetles; replanting due

By Randy Lewis

July 21, 2014

In the truth is stranger than fiction department, Los Angeles Councilman Tom LaBonge, whose district includes Griffith Park, told Pop & Hiss over the weekend that the pine tree planted in 2004 near Griffith Observatory in memory of George Harrison will be replanted shortly because the original tree died as the result of an insect infestation.

Yes, the George Harrison Tree was killed by beetles.

Except for the loss of tree life, Harrison likely would have been amused at the irony. He once said his biggest break in life was getting into the Beatles; his second biggest was getting out.

The sapling went in, unobtrusively, near the observatory with a small plaque at the base to commemorate the former Beatle, who died in 2001, because he spent his final days in Los Angeles and because he was an avid gardener for much of his adult life.

Sunflowers on Texel island beach


This video is called Sunflower time-lapse.

Ecomare museum on Texel in the Netherlands reports about scores of sunflower plants on the Mokbaai beach on the island; one of them flowering.

Many ships transport sunflower seeds (used as fodder for cattle, for kitchens, sunflower oil, etc.). Probably a ship lost some of the seeds. Sunflower seeds can float on sea water. As there is some fresh water on the Mokbaai beach, the seeds were able to form plants.

Beetle and fly quarrel on flower, video


This is a video about a spotted longhorn beetle and a common flesh fly quarreling on a goldenrod flower.

Henk Lammers in Hupsel village in the Netherlands made the video.

New butterfly species discovery in the Netherlands


This video says about itself:

Scarce Tortoiseshell Feeds on Oak Sap ヒオドシチョウがミズナラ樹液を吸汁

9 February 2014

A Scarce Tortoiseshell (aka Yellow-legged Tortoiseshell; Nymphalis xanthomelas japonica, family Nymphalidae) feeding on the fermenting sap of an oak tree (Quercus crispula, family Fagaceae). October 2013 in Japan.

Translated from the Dutch Vlinderstichting entomologists:

July 14, 2014

Invasion of a new butterfly species in the Netherlands: scarce tortoiseshell seen

This week a butterfly species entered our country which had never been seen before in the Netherlands: the scarce tortoiseshell. This involves dozens of individuals. This species was initially unnoticed because it is very similar to another one: the large tortoiseshell. An expert from the Butterfly Foundation discovered that many sightings of large tortoiseshells reported since late last week were incorrect. It was in all cases the scarce tortoiseshell.

Usually, this species, new for the Netherlands, lives much further to the east.

Turtle doves’ nests in Morocco, new research


This video from Britain is called WILDLIFE FILES TURTLE DOVES.

From Avian Biology Research, Volume 7, Number 2, May 2014, pp. 65-73(9):

Plasticity in nest placement of the Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur): experimental evidence from Moroccan agro-ecosystems

Author: Hanane, Saâd

Abstract:

A total of 364 Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur) nests were found in the Tadla irrigated area during the 2006–2009 breeding seasons. Of these, 135 were located in orange orchards, 178 in olive orchards and 51 in olive hedgerows. Gaussian generalised linear modelling was used to model the nest height and the nest–trunk distance according to the characteristics of olive and orange trees in the orchards and hedgerows. Tree height and type of plantings had the strongest effects on both nest height (R 2 = 0.67) and nest–trunk distance (R 2 = 0.48).

Overall, the same pattern of Turtle Dove nest height was recorded in the three types of plantings, whereas different patterns were noted for the nest–trunk distance. The results provide evidence of non-random patterns of nest placement in olive and orange agro-ecosystems. This game species exhibits adaptive behavioural plasticity in nest placement and appears to be well-adapted to the olive and orange grove conditions in this region. This high adaptability is beneficial to maintaining the species in these artificial habitats. Additional quantitative studies are needed to improve our understanding on the mechanisms driving the choice of nest placement by Turtle Doves in this agricultural man-made environment.

North American orchid discovery in the Netherlands


This video, in French, is about Spiranthes lucida orchids growing on the ‘île de Montréal island in Quebec, Canada.

Spiranthes lucida, shining lady’s tresses, is a North American orchid, never seen in Europe.

At least not until June this year, in a nature reserve near the Lek river in the Netherlands.

27 Spiranthes lucida orchids were discovered there, twelve of them flowering.

How did these flowers get here? This orchid species is not sold in commercial plant trade. So, not feral. Seeds brought here accidentally with trade in other products? Brought here by a migratory bird?

Roe deer feeding on buttercup flowers, video


This video is about a roe deer feeding on buttercup flowers in the Netherlands.

It seems to avoid other flower species.

P. Labots made the video.

Costa Rican botanical garden flowers


Flowers, Costa Rica, 29 March 2014

In the botanical garden in Heredia in Costa Rica on 29 March 2014, there were of course not only these birds, but also plants and flowers. Like these ones.

Bougainvillea, 29 March 2014

And this Bougainvillea. Is it Bougainvillea spectabilis (originally from the Atlantic coast of Brazil, but introduced to many other countries)?

Bougainvillea flowers, 29 March 2014

And these Bougainvillea flowers.

Flower, in Costa Rica, 29 March 2014

Jabuticaba, 29 March 2014

The garden is specialized in the original flora of the now densely populated Central Valley of Costa Rica, but there are also South American species. Like this Jabuticaba and its fruits.

Cornstalk dracaena, also present, is originally from Africa. While Thunbergia is originally from Africa and Asia.

There is a flowering Bauhinia purpurea, aka Phanera purpurea tree.

Flower, Costa Rica, 29 March 2014

Flowers, in Costa Rica, 29 March 2014

There were orchids as well.

Orchid, 29 March 2014