Iraq war re-start cartoon


Iraq war cartoon by Brian McFadden

This is a cartoon by Brian McFadden from the USA.

It is about the United States re-starting war in Iraq; a war expanding into Syria as well.

THE US’ top military commander General Dempsey has broken ranks with President Obama by telling the Senate Armed Services Committee that US troops may become involved in ground attacks against the Islamic State, and that he may recommend it, despite the repeated pledges to the contrary from President Obama: here.

The House passed measures to arm Syrian rebels in the fight against ISIS, and the vote moves to the Senate today. And President Obama walked back General Dempsey’s comments about boots on the ground in Iraq. [WSJ]

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi yesterday declared that foreign ground troops are neither necessary nor wanted in the battle against the Islamic State (Isis) group. He flatly rejected the idea after US Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman General Martin Dempsey on Tuesday said that US ground troops may be needed if current efforts to combat Isis fail: here.

British cartoonist Martin Rowson on cartoons


This video from Britain is called Martin Rowson – The Power of the Political Cartoon.

By Chris Bartter in Britain:

Rowson draws on weapons of mass political destruction

Saturday 16th august 2014

Martin Rowson: Hung, Drawn And Quartered

Assembly Rooms

4/5

AS ONE of the increasingly popular spoken-word events staged as part of the Assembly Rooms’ Fringe programme, Martin Rowson’s talk deals with the history of the cartoon and caricature from cave painting up to the present.

On the way Rowson — cartoonist to the Morning Star and Guardian among others — highlights the contributions made by his heroes through the ages, including Willima Hogarth, James Gillray, David Low and Ronald Searle.

He lets us in on some of the secrets of the cartoonist’s craft and it is fascinating to see the distinguishing aspect of a cave-painted rhinoceros — its horn — exaggerated to bring out its essential “rhinocerosness.”

Tony Blair cartoons by Martin Rowson

Rowson’s at pains to emphasise that the increasingly bland marketing of today’s politicians has led to cartoonists creating elements to undermine them — John Major’s underpants, Tony Blair’s staring eyeball and Nick Clegg as Pinocchio included. It seems that Labour PM Harold Wilson got it right in the 1970s when he adopted the public use of a pipe — privately he smoked cigars — because if you’re going to be lampooned at least give cartoonists an innocuous feature to concentrate on.

Intriguing too is the level of personal animosity a cartoonist has for his subject, or should that be victim?

Driven by Anne Widdecombe’s insistence that political cartooning is “just good fun” Rowson maintains: “No it isn’t. We really are out to destroy you.”

While that does go some way to explain the viciousness of some contemporary cartoons, Rowson’s included, one is left wondering if this is a general trait of cartoonists or, in this case, whether it’s the personal being rationalised into a generality.

Hung, Drawn… is a relatively short piece and there is much more, surely, to come on this topic from Rowson.

But it’s hugely informative — he tells us that the word “cartoon” only took on in its current meaning after its usage in Punch magazine in the 19th century, for example — and as one would expect from such a brilliant satirist it is certainly a thought-provoking exercise.

More please.

Steven Spielberg attacked by Facebook users for ‘killing dinosaur’


Steven Spielberg with 'dead' Triceratops

These Facebook users should reserve their criticism for people like the king of Spain or the United States Trump dynasty, who really kill animals which are still alive today, contrary to dinosaurs

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Steven Spielberg mercilessly trolled by Facebook users who think he killed a dinosaur

This is not a joke – Facebook users riot over an image of the director on the set of Jurassic Park

Ella Alexander

Friday 11 July 2014

Steven Spielberg has been trolled by numerous Facebook users after a photo was shared of the director with a mechanical Triceratops on the set of 1993 film Jurassic Park.

The image was posted on the Facebook page of Jay Branscomb as a joke, alongside the caption:

“Disgraceful photo of recreational hunter happily posing next to a Triceratops he just slaughtered. Please share so the world can name and shame this despicable man.”

Incredibly, a fair few members of the public didn’t grasp that the picture was taken from the Jurassic Park set, believing that Spielberg had actually poached a dinosaur; dinosaurs, a breed of animals that became extinct 66 million years ago.

The image has been shared over 33,000 times attracting thousands of comments, initially from misinformed users (apparently unaware that dinosaurs are no longer) and also those lamenting their stupidity.

Tyrell Patrick branded Spielberg “a worthless son of a b****!”, while Scoomp Pi called it a “sad, disgusting scene”.

Becky Daigle said: “One day we realise that we are killing all animals on this planet and we need them to survive. But, when we realise it will be too late.”

“I did not know that Steven Spielberg is a dinosaur hunter,” said Andrea O’Donnell Koran. “I am not only outraged, but disgusted!!”

“This is no sport!!” cried Omega McCracken, as Sondre Jorstad questioned: “Why did he kill such a rare animal?”

It is hoped that some were sarcastic, but some were so detailed it’s difficult to believe they weren’t sincere.

“He’s a disgusting inhumane p***k,” said Penelope Rayzor Buchand. “I’d love to see these hunters be stopped. I think zoos are the best way to keep these innocent animals safe… assholes like this piece of s**t are going into these beautiful animals’ homes… and killing them. It’s no different to someone coming into your home and murdering you… I’m not watching any of your movies again ANIMAL KILLER.”

Branscomb shared the picture in the wake of Facebook’s decision to delete the photos of Texan cheerleader Kendall Jones, which showed her standing next to animals that she had killed, including a leopard and a lion.

See also here.

A high school freshman in South Carolina wrote a story for a class assignment about his neighbor’s pet dinosaur. Problem is, he also wrote that he killed that dinosaur using a gun, and teachers were so alarmed they called the cops, at which point the boy was arrested and suspended from school for three days: here.

Bahraini blogger arrested for humour


This video says about itself:

Bahrain Blogger Lamees Dhaif

22 June 2011

Bahrain Blogger Lamees Dhaif and her family have been harassed because of Lamees’ posts criticizing the Bahrain government. She is now based outside of Bahrain and unable to blog. She shares her story in the Arab Spring session during Netroots Nation 2011 held in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Asked if she’s scared that there will be consequences of her speaking out at Netroots Nations 2011: “I know that I will pay for it with a very high price. But if I keep quiet, more and more people are paying every day.”

From Global Voices Advocacy:

Bahraini Satirist Blogger Takrooz Arrested

Translation posted 5 July 2014 7:19 GMT

The Bahrain Ministry of Interior announced the arrest of yet another netizen, who reportedly faces accusations of “inciting hatred against the regime.”

The satirist micro-blogger, nicknamed Takrooz, was arrested at the Bahrain International Airport, while on his way back from Thailand, said the ministry in a statement on June 18, 2014, without disclosing his name.

A day later, many Bahrainis were fuming on Twitter, saying the arrest was futile and served no purpose other than to further demonstrate the government’s true colours in stifling opposition voices online. Scores of netizens have been arrested by the regime since anti-government protests started in Bahrain on February 14, 2011. Among them are Mahmood Al-Yousif, Mohamed Almaskati and Global Voices author Mohamed Hassan.

Bahrain is regarded as an enemy of the Internet according to the Reporters without Borders’ 2014 report and is ranked second in the number of detained journalists per capita in 2013 according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

With nearly 18,000 Twitter followers and 100,000 tweets, Takrooz has been an active voice in charting the government crackdown on activists. Bahrain Watch, a research and transparency group, reported that Takrooz’ Twitter account was repeatedly targeted for surveillance by the Bahraini government. His tweets, in Arabic, cover abuse by law enforcement personnel, anti-corruption content and everyday concerns of the average Bahraini.

Nabeel Rajab: Bahrain’s people are a casualty of Washington’s political compromises: here.